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Cancellation Test

The Experts below are selected from a list of 327 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Matthieu Plichart – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Can a tablet-based Cancellation Test identify cognitive impairment in older adults?
    PLOS ONE, 2017
    Co-Authors: Ya-huei Wu, Jean-sébastien Vidal, Jocelyne De Rotrou, Sietske A.m. Sikkes, Anne-sophie Rigaud, Matthieu Plichart

    Abstract:

    Background and objective
    There has been a growing interest in using computerized cognitive assessment to detect age-related cognitive disorders. We have developed a tablet-based Cancellation Test (e-CT), previously shown as a reliable measure of executive functions and free of effect of familiarity with computer-based devices in healthy older adults. This study aimed to investigate the influence of demographics and current daily use of computer-based devices in older adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We further studied the ability of the e-CT to discriminate MCI and AD patients from older adults with normal cognition (NC).

    Methods
    The e-CT was administered to 325 older adults (NC = 112, MCI = 129, AD = 84). Subjects also performed the K-T Test, a paper-and-pencil Cancellation Test from which the e-CT was developed. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to assess the contribution of demographics and current daily use of computer-based devices on the e-CT in patient groups. The Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves and the Area Under the Curve (AUC) were established to compare the efficacy of the e-CT and the K-T Test to classify subjects into diagnostic groups.

    Results
    In the MCI group, age (B = -0.37, p

  • can a tablet based Cancellation Test identify cognitive impairment in older adults
    PLOS ONE, 2017
    Co-Authors: Ya-huei Wu, Jean-sébastien Vidal, Jocelyne De Rotrou, Sietske A.m. Sikkes, Anne-sophie Rigaud, Matthieu Plichart

    Abstract:

    Background and objective
    There has been a growing interest in using computerized cognitive assessment to detect age-related cognitive disorders. We have developed a tablet-based Cancellation Test (e-CT), previously shown as a reliable measure of executive functions and free of effect of familiarity with computer-based devices in healthy older adults. This study aimed to investigate the influence of demographics and current daily use of computer-based devices in older adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We further studied the ability of the e-CT to discriminate MCI and AD patients from older adults with normal cognition (NC).

    Methods
    The e-CT was administered to 325 older adults (NC = 112, MCI = 129, AD = 84). Subjects also performed the K-T Test, a paper-and-pencil Cancellation Test from which the e-CT was developed. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to assess the contribution of demographics and current daily use of computer-based devices on the e-CT in patient groups. The Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves and the Area Under the Curve (AUC) were established to compare the efficacy of the e-CT and the K-T Test to classify subjects into diagnostic groups.

    Results
    In the MCI group, age (B = -0.37, p<0.001) and current daily use of computer-based devices (B = 5.85, p<0.001) were associated with the number of correct Cancellations of the e-CT. In the AD group, only current daily use of a computer-based device was a significant contributor (B = 6.28, p<0.001). The e-CT (AUC = 0.811; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.756–0.867) and the K-T (AUC = 0.837; CI: 0.787–0.887) showed good and comparable diagnostic accuracy to discriminate between MCI and NC subjects. To discriminate between NC and AD, both Tests showed high diagnostic accuracy, with the AUC values of 0.923 (CI: 0.876–0.971) and 0.929 (95%CI: 0.886–0.972) for the e-CT and the K-T, respectively.

    Conclusion
    The e-CT presents satisfying discriminative validity and is a promising tool for detection of early cognitive impairment in older adults.

  • clinical utility of the k t Cancellation Test in a memory clinic population
    Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Ya-huei Wu, Jocelyne De Rotrou, Sietske A.m. Sikkes, Anne-sophie Rigaud, Matthieu Plichart

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACTBackground/Aim: The K-T Cancellation Test (K-T) has been validated as a measure of executive functions (EF) but its clinical utility has not yet been examined. This study aimed to validate K-T in a memory clinic setting by examining its capacity to discriminate older adults with normal cognition (NC) from those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Method: K-T was administered to 120 NC subjects, 146 patients with MCI, and 93 patients with AD. A one-way analysis of covariance was used to compare the correct Cancellations of K-T between the groups. Linear regressions were run to identify significant demographic predictors of K-T for NC subjects and to determine the equation to calculate z scores for all subjects. The area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), and positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values were assessed to compare the diagnostic performance between K-T and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) for discrimination between N…

Ya-huei Wu – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Can a tablet-based Cancellation Test identify cognitive impairment in older adults?
    PLOS ONE, 2017
    Co-Authors: Ya-huei Wu, Jean-sébastien Vidal, Jocelyne De Rotrou, Sietske A.m. Sikkes, Anne-sophie Rigaud, Matthieu Plichart

    Abstract:

    Background and objective
    There has been a growing interest in using computerized cognitive assessment to detect age-related cognitive disorders. We have developed a tablet-based Cancellation Test (e-CT), previously shown as a reliable measure of executive functions and free of effect of familiarity with computer-based devices in healthy older adults. This study aimed to investigate the influence of demographics and current daily use of computer-based devices in older adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We further studied the ability of the e-CT to discriminate MCI and AD patients from older adults with normal cognition (NC).

    Methods
    The e-CT was administered to 325 older adults (NC = 112, MCI = 129, AD = 84). Subjects also performed the K-T Test, a paper-and-pencil Cancellation Test from which the e-CT was developed. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to assess the contribution of demographics and current daily use of computer-based devices on the e-CT in patient groups. The Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves and the Area Under the Curve (AUC) were established to compare the efficacy of the e-CT and the K-T Test to classify subjects into diagnostic groups.

    Results
    In the MCI group, age (B = -0.37, p

  • can a tablet based Cancellation Test identify cognitive impairment in older adults
    PLOS ONE, 2017
    Co-Authors: Ya-huei Wu, Jean-sébastien Vidal, Jocelyne De Rotrou, Sietske A.m. Sikkes, Anne-sophie Rigaud, Matthieu Plichart

    Abstract:

    Background and objective
    There has been a growing interest in using computerized cognitive assessment to detect age-related cognitive disorders. We have developed a tablet-based Cancellation Test (e-CT), previously shown as a reliable measure of executive functions and free of effect of familiarity with computer-based devices in healthy older adults. This study aimed to investigate the influence of demographics and current daily use of computer-based devices in older adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We further studied the ability of the e-CT to discriminate MCI and AD patients from older adults with normal cognition (NC).

    Methods
    The e-CT was administered to 325 older adults (NC = 112, MCI = 129, AD = 84). Subjects also performed the K-T Test, a paper-and-pencil Cancellation Test from which the e-CT was developed. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to assess the contribution of demographics and current daily use of computer-based devices on the e-CT in patient groups. The Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves and the Area Under the Curve (AUC) were established to compare the efficacy of the e-CT and the K-T Test to classify subjects into diagnostic groups.

    Results
    In the MCI group, age (B = -0.37, p<0.001) and current daily use of computer-based devices (B = 5.85, p<0.001) were associated with the number of correct Cancellations of the e-CT. In the AD group, only current daily use of a computer-based device was a significant contributor (B = 6.28, p<0.001). The e-CT (AUC = 0.811; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.756–0.867) and the K-T (AUC = 0.837; CI: 0.787–0.887) showed good and comparable diagnostic accuracy to discriminate between MCI and NC subjects. To discriminate between NC and AD, both Tests showed high diagnostic accuracy, with the AUC values of 0.923 (CI: 0.876–0.971) and 0.929 (95%CI: 0.886–0.972) for the e-CT and the K-T, respectively.

    Conclusion
    The e-CT presents satisfying discriminative validity and is a promising tool for detection of early cognitive impairment in older adults.

  • clinical utility of the k t Cancellation Test in a memory clinic population
    Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Ya-huei Wu, Jocelyne De Rotrou, Sietske A.m. Sikkes, Anne-sophie Rigaud, Matthieu Plichart

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACTBackground/Aim: The K-T Cancellation Test (K-T) has been validated as a measure of executive functions (EF) but its clinical utility has not yet been examined. This study aimed to validate K-T in a memory clinic setting by examining its capacity to discriminate older adults with normal cognition (NC) from those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Method: K-T was administered to 120 NC subjects, 146 patients with MCI, and 93 patients with AD. A one-way analysis of covariance was used to compare the correct Cancellations of K-T between the groups. Linear regressions were run to identify significant demographic predictors of K-T for NC subjects and to determine the equation to calculate z scores for all subjects. The area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), and positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values were assessed to compare the diagnostic performance between K-T and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) for discrimination between N…

Han Eun Young – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The Effect of Virtual Reality Training on Unilateral Spatial Neglect in Stroke Patients
    Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine, 2011
    Co-Authors: Yong Mi Kim, Min Ho Chun, Gi Jeong Yun, Young-jin Song, Han Eun Young

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of virtual reality training on unilateral spatial neglect in stroke patients. METHOD: Twenty-four stroke patients (14 males and 10 females, mean age=64.7) who had unilateral spatial neglect as a result of right hemisphere stroke were recruited. All patients were randomly assigned to either the virtual reality (VR) group (n=12) or the control group (n=12). The VR group received VR training, which stimulated the left side of their bodies. The control group received conventional neglect therapy such as visual scanning training. Both groups received therapy for 30 minutes a day, five days per week for three weeks. Outcome measurements included star Cancellation Test, line bisection Test, Catherine Bergego scale (CBS), and the Korean version of modified Barthel index (K-MBI). These measurements were taken before and after treatment. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the baseline characteristics and initial values between the two groups. The changes in star Cancellation Test results and CBS in the VR group were significantly higher than those of the control group after treatment. The changes in line bisection Test score and the K-MBI in the VR group were not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that virtual reality training may be a beneficial therapeutic technique on unilateral spatial neglect in stroke patients.