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Central Nervous System

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Antoine Louveau – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • structural and functional features of Central Nervous System lymphatic vessels
    Nature, 2015
    Co-Authors: Antoine Louveau, Igor Smirnov, Timothy J. Keyes, J.d. Eccles, Sherin J. Rouhani, Noel C. Derecki, David Castle, James W. Mandell, David J Peske, Tajie H Harris
    Abstract:

    The Central Nervous System undergoes constant immune surveillance, but the route that immune cells take to exit the brain has been unclear as it had been thought to lack a classical lymphatic drainage System; here functional lymphatic vessels able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the cerebrospinal fluid are shown to be located in the brain meninges. The Central Nervous System is under constant immune surveillance, but the exit route for immune cells has been unclear as the brain was thought to lack a classical lymphatic drainage System. Jonathan Kipnis and colleagues now show that the brain does indeed possess functional lymphatic vessels, located in the meninges, and that these vessels are able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the cerebrospinal fluid. The presence of a classical lymphatic System in the Central Nervous System suggests that current thinking on brain tolerance and the immune privilege of the brain should be revisited. Malfunction of the meningeal lymphatic vessels could be a root cause of a variety of neuroimmunological disorders. One of the characteristics of the Central Nervous System is the lack of a classical lymphatic drainage System. Although it is now accepted that the Central Nervous System undergoes constant immune surveillance that takes place within the meningeal compartment1,2,3, the mechanisms governing the entrance and exit of immune cells from the Central Nervous System remain poorly understood4,5,6. In searching for T-cell gateways into and out of the meninges, we discovered functional lymphatic vessels lining the dural sinuses. These structures express all of the molecular hallmarks of lymphatic endothelial cells, are able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the cerebrospinal fluid, and are connected to the deep cervical lymph nodes. The unique location of these vessels may have impeded their discovery to date, thereby contributing to the long-held concept of the absence of lymphatic vasculature in the Central Nervous System. The discovery of the Central Nervous System lymphatic System may call for a reassessment of basic assumptions in neuroimmunology and sheds new light on the aetiology of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases associated with immune System dysfunction.

  • Structural and functional features of Central Nervous System lymphatic vessels
    Nature, 2015
    Co-Authors: Antoine Louveau, Igor Smirnov, Timothy J. Keyes, J.d. Eccles, Sherin J. Rouhani, J. David Peske, Noel C. Derecki, David Castle, James W. Mandell, Kevin S. Lee
    Abstract:

    One of the characteristics of the Central Nervous System is the lack of a classical lymphatic drainage System. Although it is now accepted that the Central Nervous System undergoes constant immune surveillance that takes place within the meningeal compartment, the mechanisms governing the entrance and exit of immune cells from the Central Nervous System remain poorly understood. In searching for T-cell gateways into and out of the meninges, we discovered functional lymphatic vessels lining the dural sinuses. These structures express all of the molecular hallmarks of lymphatic endothelial cells, are able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the cerebrospinal fluid, and are connected to the deep cervical lymph nodes. The unique location of these vessels may have impeded their discovery to date, thereby contributing to the long-held concept of the absence of lymphatic vasculature in the Central Nervous System. The discovery of the Central Nervous System lymphatic System may call for a reassessment of basic assumptions in neuroimmunology and sheds new light on the aetiology of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases associated with immune System dysfunction.

Tajie H Harris – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • structural and functional features of Central Nervous System lymphatic vessels
    Nature, 2015
    Co-Authors: Antoine Louveau, Igor Smirnov, Timothy J. Keyes, J.d. Eccles, Sherin J. Rouhani, Noel C. Derecki, David Castle, James W. Mandell, David J Peske, Tajie H Harris
    Abstract:

    The Central Nervous System undergoes constant immune surveillance, but the route that immune cells take to exit the brain has been unclear as it had been thought to lack a classical lymphatic drainage System; here functional lymphatic vessels able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the cerebrospinal fluid are shown to be located in the brain meninges. The Central Nervous System is under constant immune surveillance, but the exit route for immune cells has been unclear as the brain was thought to lack a classical lymphatic drainage System. Jonathan Kipnis and colleagues now show that the brain does indeed possess functional lymphatic vessels, located in the meninges, and that these vessels are able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the cerebrospinal fluid. The presence of a classical lymphatic System in the Central Nervous System suggests that current thinking on brain tolerance and the immune privilege of the brain should be revisited. Malfunction of the meningeal lymphatic vessels could be a root cause of a variety of neuroimmunological disorders. One of the characteristics of the Central Nervous System is the lack of a classical lymphatic drainage System. Although it is now accepted that the Central Nervous System undergoes constant immune surveillance that takes place within the meningeal compartment1,2,3, the mechanisms governing the entrance and exit of immune cells from the Central Nervous System remain poorly understood4,5,6. In searching for T-cell gateways into and out of the meninges, we discovered functional lymphatic vessels lining the dural sinuses. These structures express all of the molecular hallmarks of lymphatic endothelial cells, are able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the cerebrospinal fluid, and are connected to the deep cervical lymph nodes. The unique location of these vessels may have impeded their discovery to date, thereby contributing to the long-held concept of the absence of lymphatic vasculature in the Central Nervous System. The discovery of the Central Nervous System lymphatic System may call for a reassessment of basic assumptions in neuroimmunology and sheds new light on the aetiology of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases associated with immune System dysfunction.

Kevin S. Lee – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Structural and functional features of Central Nervous System lymphatic vessels
    Nature, 2015
    Co-Authors: Antoine Louveau, Igor Smirnov, Timothy J. Keyes, J.d. Eccles, Sherin J. Rouhani, J. David Peske, Noel C. Derecki, David Castle, James W. Mandell, Kevin S. Lee
    Abstract:

    One of the characteristics of the Central Nervous System is the lack of a classical lymphatic drainage System. Although it is now accepted that the Central Nervous System undergoes constant immune surveillance that takes place within the meningeal compartment, the mechanisms governing the entrance and exit of immune cells from the Central Nervous System remain poorly understood. In searching for T-cell gateways into and out of the meninges, we discovered functional lymphatic vessels lining the dural sinuses. These structures express all of the molecular hallmarks of lymphatic endothelial cells, are able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the cerebrospinal fluid, and are connected to the deep cervical lymph nodes. The unique location of these vessels may have impeded their discovery to date, thereby contributing to the long-held concept of the absence of lymphatic vasculature in the Central Nervous System. The discovery of the Central Nervous System lymphatic System may call for a reassessment of basic assumptions in neuroimmunology and sheds new light on the aetiology of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases associated with immune System dysfunction.

Noel C. Derecki – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • structural and functional features of Central Nervous System lymphatic vessels
    Nature, 2015
    Co-Authors: Antoine Louveau, Igor Smirnov, Timothy J. Keyes, J.d. Eccles, Sherin J. Rouhani, Noel C. Derecki, David Castle, James W. Mandell, David J Peske, Tajie H Harris
    Abstract:

    The Central Nervous System undergoes constant immune surveillance, but the route that immune cells take to exit the brain has been unclear as it had been thought to lack a classical lymphatic drainage System; here functional lymphatic vessels able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the cerebrospinal fluid are shown to be located in the brain meninges. The Central Nervous System is under constant immune surveillance, but the exit route for immune cells has been unclear as the brain was thought to lack a classical lymphatic drainage System. Jonathan Kipnis and colleagues now show that the brain does indeed possess functional lymphatic vessels, located in the meninges, and that these vessels are able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the cerebrospinal fluid. The presence of a classical lymphatic System in the Central Nervous System suggests that current thinking on brain tolerance and the immune privilege of the brain should be revisited. Malfunction of the meningeal lymphatic vessels could be a root cause of a variety of neuroimmunological disorders. One of the characteristics of the Central Nervous System is the lack of a classical lymphatic drainage System. Although it is now accepted that the Central Nervous System undergoes constant immune surveillance that takes place within the meningeal compartment1,2,3, the mechanisms governing the entrance and exit of immune cells from the Central Nervous System remain poorly understood4,5,6. In searching for T-cell gateways into and out of the meninges, we discovered functional lymphatic vessels lining the dural sinuses. These structures express all of the molecular hallmarks of lymphatic endothelial cells, are able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the cerebrospinal fluid, and are connected to the deep cervical lymph nodes. The unique location of these vessels may have impeded their discovery to date, thereby contributing to the long-held concept of the absence of lymphatic vasculature in the Central Nervous System. The discovery of the Central Nervous System lymphatic System may call for a reassessment of basic assumptions in neuroimmunology and sheds new light on the aetiology of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases associated with immune System dysfunction.

  • Structural and functional features of Central Nervous System lymphatic vessels
    Nature, 2015
    Co-Authors: Antoine Louveau, Igor Smirnov, Timothy J. Keyes, J.d. Eccles, Sherin J. Rouhani, J. David Peske, Noel C. Derecki, David Castle, James W. Mandell, Kevin S. Lee
    Abstract:

    One of the characteristics of the Central Nervous System is the lack of a classical lymphatic drainage System. Although it is now accepted that the Central Nervous System undergoes constant immune surveillance that takes place within the meningeal compartment, the mechanisms governing the entrance and exit of immune cells from the Central Nervous System remain poorly understood. In searching for T-cell gateways into and out of the meninges, we discovered functional lymphatic vessels lining the dural sinuses. These structures express all of the molecular hallmarks of lymphatic endothelial cells, are able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the cerebrospinal fluid, and are connected to the deep cervical lymph nodes. The unique location of these vessels may have impeded their discovery to date, thereby contributing to the long-held concept of the absence of lymphatic vasculature in the Central Nervous System. The discovery of the Central Nervous System lymphatic System may call for a reassessment of basic assumptions in neuroimmunology and sheds new light on the aetiology of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases associated with immune System dysfunction.

Sherin J. Rouhani – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • structural and functional features of Central Nervous System lymphatic vessels
    Nature, 2015
    Co-Authors: Antoine Louveau, Igor Smirnov, Timothy J. Keyes, J.d. Eccles, Sherin J. Rouhani, Noel C. Derecki, David Castle, James W. Mandell, David J Peske, Tajie H Harris
    Abstract:

    The Central Nervous System undergoes constant immune surveillance, but the route that immune cells take to exit the brain has been unclear as it had been thought to lack a classical lymphatic drainage System; here functional lymphatic vessels able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the cerebrospinal fluid are shown to be located in the brain meninges. The Central Nervous System is under constant immune surveillance, but the exit route for immune cells has been unclear as the brain was thought to lack a classical lymphatic drainage System. Jonathan Kipnis and colleagues now show that the brain does indeed possess functional lymphatic vessels, located in the meninges, and that these vessels are able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the cerebrospinal fluid. The presence of a classical lymphatic System in the Central Nervous System suggests that current thinking on brain tolerance and the immune privilege of the brain should be revisited. Malfunction of the meningeal lymphatic vessels could be a root cause of a variety of neuroimmunological disorders. One of the characteristics of the Central Nervous System is the lack of a classical lymphatic drainage System. Although it is now accepted that the Central Nervous System undergoes constant immune surveillance that takes place within the meningeal compartment1,2,3, the mechanisms governing the entrance and exit of immune cells from the Central Nervous System remain poorly understood4,5,6. In searching for T-cell gateways into and out of the meninges, we discovered functional lymphatic vessels lining the dural sinuses. These structures express all of the molecular hallmarks of lymphatic endothelial cells, are able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the cerebrospinal fluid, and are connected to the deep cervical lymph nodes. The unique location of these vessels may have impeded their discovery to date, thereby contributing to the long-held concept of the absence of lymphatic vasculature in the Central Nervous System. The discovery of the Central Nervous System lymphatic System may call for a reassessment of basic assumptions in neuroimmunology and sheds new light on the aetiology of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases associated with immune System dysfunction.

  • Structural and functional features of Central Nervous System lymphatic vessels
    Nature, 2015
    Co-Authors: Antoine Louveau, Igor Smirnov, Timothy J. Keyes, J.d. Eccles, Sherin J. Rouhani, J. David Peske, Noel C. Derecki, David Castle, James W. Mandell, Kevin S. Lee
    Abstract:

    One of the characteristics of the Central Nervous System is the lack of a classical lymphatic drainage System. Although it is now accepted that the Central Nervous System undergoes constant immune surveillance that takes place within the meningeal compartment, the mechanisms governing the entrance and exit of immune cells from the Central Nervous System remain poorly understood. In searching for T-cell gateways into and out of the meninges, we discovered functional lymphatic vessels lining the dural sinuses. These structures express all of the molecular hallmarks of lymphatic endothelial cells, are able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the cerebrospinal fluid, and are connected to the deep cervical lymph nodes. The unique location of these vessels may have impeded their discovery to date, thereby contributing to the long-held concept of the absence of lymphatic vasculature in the Central Nervous System. The discovery of the Central Nervous System lymphatic System may call for a reassessment of basic assumptions in neuroimmunology and sheds new light on the aetiology of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases associated with immune System dysfunction.