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Compressive Strength

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Minoru Miwa – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Effects of surface and sizing treatments on axial Compressive Strength of carbon fibres
    Journal of Materials Science, 1996
    Co-Authors: Minoru Miwa, Akiyoshi Takeno, Y. Mori, Teruyuki Yokoi, Akira Watanabe
    Abstract:

    Attempts have been made to estimate the fibre axial Compressive Strength of pitch-based graphitized fibres, and the effects of surface- and size-treatment on Compressive Strength was investigated. The estimated Compressive Strength of fibres decreases with increasing temperature. This decrease in Compressive Strength may be accounted for by a decrease in the radial compression force owing to a decrease in the residual therthermal stress and a decrease in Young’s modulus of the resin matrix. There is a linear relationship between the estimated Compressive Strength and radial compression force in a temperature range from room temperature to 80 °C. The real Compressive Strength of the fibres, determined by extrapolating this straight line until the radial compression force is zero, increases with increasing shear yield Strength at the fibre-matrix interphase. In order to obtain reinforcing fibres with a higher Compressive Strength, it will be necessary to surface- and size-treat the fibres.

  • Axial Compressive Strength of carbon fiber with tensile Strength distribution
    Journal of Applied Polymer Science, 1991
    Co-Authors: Minoru Miwa, Eiki Tsushima, Jun Takayasu
    Abstract:

    Measuring the fiber lengths of the broken pieces and estimating the mean tensile Strength from the length just before the final fragment length in tension, efforts were made to estimate the axial Compressive Strengths of carbon fibers when the tensile Strength varies with the length. The estimated Compressive Strength of carbon fibers decreases with increasing temperature. This decrease in Compressive Strength may be accounted for by a decrease in the radial Compressive force owing to a decrease in the residual therthermal stress and a decrease in Young’s modulus of the resin matrix. There is a linear relationship between the estimated Compressive Strength and radial compressing force in the temperature range from room temperature to 80°C. The real Compressive Strength of the fibers, determined by extrapolating this straight line until the radial compressing force is zero, is about 20% higher than the Compressive Strength estimated by assuming that the tensile Strength is uniform. It is approximately 10–50% of tensile Strength. A linear relationship between the fiber axial Compressive Strength and Compressive Strength of the unidirectional composites is found. The experimental values agree with the values calculated by the rule of mixtures.

  • Axial Compressive Strength of carbon fiber
    Journal of Applied Polymer Science, 1990
    Co-Authors: Tadashi Ohsawa, Minoru Miwa, Masato Kawade, Eiki Tsushima
    Abstract:

    Efforts were made to estimate the axial Compressive Strengths of carbon fibers from the fiber fragment lengths produced by subjecting to a strain greater than the fiber ultimate strain for PAN-based and pitch-based carbon fibers. The estimated Compressive Strength of carbon fibers decreases with increasing temperature in a temperature range from room temperature to 100°C. This decrease in Compressive Strength may be accounted for by a decrease in the radial compressing force. The real Compressive Strength, determined by extrapolating a linear relationship between the estimated Compressive Strength and the radial compressing force, is approximately 25–60% of tensile Strength for PAN-based fibers, while it is approximately 10–35% for pitch-based fibers.

Ramazan Demirboga – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Compressive Strength and ultrasound pulse velocity of mineral admixtured mortars
    Indian Journal of Engineering and Materials Sciences, 2006
    Co-Authors: Ramazan Demirboga, Tekin Güvercin
    Abstract:

    Ultrasound pulse velocity is used to evaluate the Compressive Strength of mortar with mineral admixtures. In addition, the relationship between ultrasound velocity and destructive Compressive Strength are evaluated. Silica fume (SF), fly ash (FA) and blast furnfurnaceg (BFS) are used as mineral admixtures for the replacement of Portland cement (PC) up to 30%, 50% and 70%, respectively, by weight. The maximum Compressive Strength and ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) have been observed with the samples containing BFS. Both Compressive Strength and UPV are very low for all the levels of mineral admiadmixture at an early age curing, especially for samples containing high volume FA. However, with the increase of curing period both Compressive Strength and UPV of all the samples are increased. 10% of SF increased both Compressive Strength and UPV at 7, 28 and 90-day curing period, but the other SF replacement decreased. At 28 and 90-day of curing periods, BFS increased UPV for all levels and increased Compressive Strength for 10% and 20% BFS replacement. In addition, reductions due to BFS at early ages are decreased for the other level of BFS, even at 28-day of curing period and for 10%, 20%, 30% and 50% increased Compressive Strength 36%, 24%, 22% and 8%, respectively. The increment in the Compressive Strength due to curing period is higher than that of UPV. The relationship between UPV and Compressive Strength is exponential for SF, FA and BFS.

  • relationship between ultrasonic velocity and Compressive Strength for high volume mineral admixtured concrete
    Cement and Concrete Research, 2004
    Co-Authors: Ramazan Demirboga, Ibrahim Turkmen, Mehmet Burhan Karakoc
    Abstract:

    Abstract Ultrasound is used to evaluate the Compressive Strength of concrete with mineral admixtures. In addition, the relationship between ultrasound velocity and Compressive Strength of concrete are evaluated. High-volume fly ash (FA), blast furnfurnaceg (BFS) and FA+BFS are used as the mineral admixtures in replacement of Portland cement (PC). Compressive Strength and ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) were determined at the 3-, 7-, 28- and 120-day curing period. Both Compressive Strength and UPV were very low for all the levels of mineral admixtures at an early age of curing, especially for samples containing FA. However, with the increase of curing period, both Compressive Strength and UPV of all the samples increased. The relationship between UPV and Compressive Strength was exponential for FA, BFS and FA+BFS. However, constants were different for each mineral admiadmixture and each level replacement of PC.

Kuanhong Zeng – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Compressive Strength of Al_2O_3 Composites Reinforced with Three-Dimensional Carbon Fiber Preform
    Advanced Functional Materials, 2018
    Co-Authors: Chaoyang Fan, Qingsong Ma, Kuanhong Zeng
    Abstract:

    The static Compressive Strength and the impact resistance of three-dimensional carbon fiber preform reinforced Al_2O_3 (C/Al_2O_3) composites were investigated in this paper. It was found that the static Compressive Strength in Z direction was 422.7 MPa, which is higher than that in X direction. The results from split-hopkinson pressure bar experiment indicated that the dynamic Compressive Strength of C/Al_2O_3 composites enhanced when the strain rate ranged from 400 to 1600 s^−1, followed by decline at 2700 s^−1. The relationship between structure and Compressive Strength is discussed.

Eiki Tsushima – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Axial Compressive Strength of carbon fiber with tensile Strength distribution
    Journal of Applied Polymer Science, 1991
    Co-Authors: Minoru Miwa, Eiki Tsushima, Jun Takayasu
    Abstract:

    Measuring the fiber lengths of the broken pieces and estimating the mean tensile Strength from the length just before the final fragment length in tension, efforts were made to estimate the axial Compressive Strengths of carbon fibers when the tensile Strength varies with the length. The estimated Compressive Strength of carbon fibers decreases with increasing temperature. This decrease in Compressive Strength may be accounted for by a decrease in the radial Compressive force owing to a decrease in the residual thermal stress and a decrease in Young’s modulus of the resin matrix. There is a linear relationship between the estimated Compressive Strength and radial compressing force in the temperature range from room temperature to 80°C. The real Compressive Strength of the fibers, determined by extrapolating this straight line until the radial compressing force is zero, is about 20% higher than the Compressive Strength estimated by assuming that the tensile Strength is uniform. It is approximately 10–50% of tensile Strength. A linear relationship between the fiber axial Compressive Strength and Compressive Strength of the unidirectional composites is found. The experimental values agree with the values calculated by the rule of mixtures.

  • Axial Compressive Strength of carbon fiber
    Journal of Applied Polymer Science, 1990
    Co-Authors: Tadashi Ohsawa, Minoru Miwa, Masato Kawade, Eiki Tsushima
    Abstract:

    Efforts were made to estimate the axial Compressive Strengths of carbon fibers from the fiber fragment lengths produced by subjecting to a strain greater than the fiber ultimate strain for PAN-based and pitch-based carbon fibers. The estimated Compressive Strength of carbon fibers decreases with increasing temperature in a temperature range from room temperature to 100°C. This decrease in Compressive Strength may be accounted for by a decrease in the radial compressing force. The real Compressive Strength, determined by extrapolating a linear relationship between the estimated Compressive Strength and the radial compressing force, is approximately 25–60% of tensile Strength for PAN-based fibers, while it is approximately 10–35% for pitch-based fibers.

Mehmet Burhan Karakoc – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • relationship between ultrasonic velocity and Compressive Strength for high volume mineral admixtured concrete
    Cement and Concrete Research, 2004
    Co-Authors: Ramazan Demirboga, Ibrahim Turkmen, Mehmet Burhan Karakoc
    Abstract:

    Abstract Ultrasound is used to evaluate the Compressive Strength of concrete with mineral admixtures. In addition, the relationship between ultrasound velocity and Compressive Strength of concrete are evaluated. High-volume fly ash (FA), blast furnace slag (BFS) and FA+BFS are used as the mineral admixtures in replacement of Portland cement (PC). Compressive Strength and ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) were determined at the 3-, 7-, 28- and 120-day curing period. Both Compressive Strength and UPV were very low for all the levels of mineral admixtures at an early age of curing, especially for samples containing FA. However, with the increase of curing period, both Compressive Strength and UPV of all the samples increased. The relationship between UPV and Compressive Strength was exponential for FA, BFS and FA+BFS. However, constants were different for each mineral admixture and each level replacement of PC.