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Just T Baylesempere – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Maite Vazquezluis – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • comparison between amphipod assemblages associated with caulerpa racemosa var cylindracea and those of other mediterranean Habitats on soft substrate
    Estuarine Coastal and Shelf Science, 2009
    Co-Authors: Maite Vazquezluis, Pablo Sanchezjerez, Just T Baylesempere
    Abstract:

    The spread of the invasive alga Caulerpa racemosa var. cylindracea in shallow-water Habitats can present different faunal assemblage composition. We compared the amphipod assemblages associated with C. racemosa and natural Habitats found on shallow-water Mediterranean soft substrata. Four vegetated Habitats were compared: C. racemosa, Caulerpa prolifera, Cymodocea nodosa and Posidonia oceanica with unvegetated substrata. Samples were collected during two sampling periods (September 2004 and March 2005). A total of 63 amphipod species were recorded. The results showed that the vegetated Habitats sampled, including C. racemosa stands, supported a higher abundance and species richness of amphipods. Furthermore, the assemblage structure differed between the different Habitats, while the abundance of some species was significantly different, depending on habitat. For example, Microdeutopus obtusatus was favoured by C. racemosa habitat; Ampelisca diadema was associated with C. prolifera beds; and Hyale schmidti was more abundant in P. oceanica meadows. Habitat invasion by C. racemosa can exert an important influence on biotic assemblages, modifying habitat structure and associated fauna.

  • changes in amphipod crustacea assemblages associated with shallow water algal Habitats invaded by caulerpa racemosa var cylindracea in the western mediterranean sea
    Marine Environmental Research, 2008
    Co-Authors: Maite Vazquezluis, Pablo Sanchezjerez, Just T Baylesempere
    Abstract:

    The effects of the invasive species Caulerpa racemosa var. cylindracea (hereafter C. racemosa) on amphipod assemblages associated with shallow-water rocky Habitats were studied. Two Habitats located along the SE Iberian Peninsula were compared; invaded and non-invaded. The results showed that growth of C. racemosa affects habitat structure, influencing the species composition and biomass of macroalgae, and detritus accumulation. In turn, such changes in habitat features affected the associated amphipod assemblages with different ecological requirements. However, the species richness of amphipods was relatively high in both Habitats, while the species composition of amphipods changed completely. For example, some species such as Ampithoe ramondi and Hyale schmidti did not colonize invaded Habitats, while others such as Apocorophium acutum were favoured by the spread of C. racemosa. Habitat invasion by C. racemosa can have an important influence on biotic assemblages, modifying both habitat structure and the associated fauna, with unknown effects on the overall ecosystem.

Philippe Jeanneret – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • structure function and management of semi natural Habitats for conservation biological control a review of european studies
    Pest Management Science, 2016
    Co-Authors: J M Holland, Felix J J A Bianchi, Martin H Entling, A C Moonen, B Smith, Philippe Jeanneret
    Abstract:

    Different semi-natural Habitats occur on farmland, and it is the vegetation’s traits and structure that subsequently determine their ability to support natural enemies and their associated contribution to conservation biocontrol. New Habitats can be created and existing ones improved with agri-environment scheme funding in all EU member states. Understanding the contribution of each habitat type can aid the development of conservation control strategies. Here we review the extent to which the predominant habitat types in Europe support natural enemies, whether this results in enhanced natural enemy densities in the adjacent crop and whether this leads to reduced pest densities. Considerable variation exists in the available information for the different habitat types and trophic levels. Natural enemies within each habitat were the most studied, with less information on whether they were enhanced in adjacent fields, while their impact on pests was rarely investigated. Most information was available for woody and herbaceous linear Habitats, yet not for woodland which can be the most common semi-natural habitat in many regions. While the management and design of Habitats offer potential to stimulate conservation biocontrol, we also identified knowledge gaps. A better understanding of the relationship between resource availability and arthropod communities across habitat types, the spatiotemporal distribution of resources in the landscape and interactions with other factors that play a role in pest regulation could contribute to an informed management of semi-natural Habitats for biocontrol.

Pablo Sanchezjerez – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • comparison between amphipod assemblages associated with caulerpa racemosa var cylindracea and those of other mediterranean Habitats on soft substrate
    Estuarine Coastal and Shelf Science, 2009
    Co-Authors: Maite Vazquezluis, Pablo Sanchezjerez, Just T Baylesempere
    Abstract:

    The spread of the invasive alga Caulerpa racemosa var. cylindracea in shallow-water Habitats can present different faunal assemblage composition. We compared the amphipod assemblages associated with C. racemosa and natural Habitats found on shallow-water Mediterranean soft substrata. Four vegetated Habitats were compared: C. racemosa, Caulerpa prolifera, Cymodocea nodosa and Posidonia oceanica with unvegetated substrata. Samples were collected during two sampling periods (September 2004 and March 2005). A total of 63 amphipod species were recorded. The results showed that the vegetated Habitats sampled, including C. racemosa stands, supported a higher abundance and species richness of amphipods. Furthermore, the assemblage structure differed between the different Habitats, while the abundance of some species was significantly different, depending on habitat. For example, Microdeutopus obtusatus was favoured by C. racemosa habitat; Ampelisca diadema was associated with C. prolifera beds; and Hyale schmidti was more abundant in P. oceanica meadows. Habitat invasion by C. racemosa can exert an important influence on biotic assemblages, modifying habitat structure and associated fauna.

  • changes in amphipod crustacea assemblages associated with shallow water algal Habitats invaded by caulerpa racemosa var cylindracea in the western mediterranean sea
    Marine Environmental Research, 2008
    Co-Authors: Maite Vazquezluis, Pablo Sanchezjerez, Just T Baylesempere
    Abstract:

    The effects of the invasive species Caulerpa racemosa var. cylindracea (hereafter C. racemosa) on amphipod assemblages associated with shallow-water rocky Habitats were studied. Two Habitats located along the SE Iberian Peninsula were compared; invaded and non-invaded. The results showed that growth of C. racemosa affects habitat structure, influencing the species composition and biomass of macroalgae, and detritus accumulation. In turn, such changes in habitat features affected the associated amphipod assemblages with different ecological requirements. However, the species richness of amphipods was relatively high in both Habitats, while the species composition of amphipods changed completely. For example, some species such as Ampithoe ramondi and Hyale schmidti did not colonize invaded Habitats, while others such as Apocorophium acutum were favoured by the spread of C. racemosa. Habitat invasion by C. racemosa can have an important influence on biotic assemblages, modifying both habitat structure and the associated fauna, with unknown effects on the overall ecosystem.

J M Holland – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • structure function and management of semi natural Habitats for conservation biological control a review of european studies
    Pest Management Science, 2016
    Co-Authors: J M Holland, Felix J J A Bianchi, Martin H Entling, A C Moonen, B Smith, Philippe Jeanneret
    Abstract:

    Different semi-natural Habitats occur on farmland, and it is the vegetation’s traits and structure that subsequently determine their ability to support natural enemies and their associated contribution to conservation biocontrol. New Habitats can be created and existing ones improved with agri-environment scheme funding in all EU member states. Understanding the contribution of each habitat type can aid the development of conservation control strategies. Here we review the extent to which the predominant habitat types in Europe support natural enemies, whether this results in enhanced natural enemy densities in the adjacent crop and whether this leads to reduced pest densities. Considerable variation exists in the available information for the different habitat types and trophic levels. Natural enemies within each habitat were the most studied, with less information on whether they were enhanced in adjacent fields, while their impact on pests was rarely investigated. Most information was available for woody and herbaceous linear Habitats, yet not for woodland which can be the most common semi-natural habitat in many regions. While the management and design of Habitats offer potential to stimulate conservation biocontrol, we also identified knowledge gaps. A better understanding of the relationship between resource availability and arthropod communities across habitat types, the spatiotemporal distribution of resources in the landscape and interactions with other factors that play a role in pest regulation could contribute to an informed management of semi-natural Habitats for biocontrol.