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Plastic Surgery

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Jamil Ahmad - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Assessing the Plastic Surgery workforce: A template for the future of Plastic Surgery
    Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 2010
    Co-Authors: Rod J. Rohrich, Mary H. Mcgrath, W. Thomas Lawrence, Jamil Ahmad
    Abstract:

    Background: The American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) formed the Plastic Surgery Workforce Task Force to study the size of the Plastic Surgery workforce and make recommendations about future workforce needs. The ASPS member workforce survey and two supplementary surveys of Plastic Surgery academic chairs and senior residents were developed to gain insights on current and projected demand for Plastic Surgery procedures and to find out more about Plastic surgeons' current daily practice patterns and plans for the future. Methods: The ASPS member workforce survey was mailed to 2500 randomly selected ASPS active members practicing in the United States, and a second mailing was sent to 388 unique members who practice in an academic setting; a total of 1256 surgeons responded (43.5 percent response rate). The survey of academic chairs was distributed to 103 attendees at the annual meeting of the Association of Academic Chairmen of Plastic Surgery, and 74 returned the survey (71.8 percent response rate). The survey of senior residents was e-mailed to 183 graduating residents, of whom 65 responded (35.5 percent response rate). Results: Useful demographic information regarding the current Plastic Surgery workforce was obtained from these surveys. In addition, insight into current trends in practice composition and procedural demand was gained. Conclusions: The rapid growth of the U.S. population, combined with a significant number of Plastic surgeons approaching retirement and an unchanged number of Plastic Surgery residency training positions, will lead to a discrepancy between the demand for Plastic Surgery procedures and the supply of appropriately trained physicians. Without an increase in the number of Plastic surgeons trained each year, there will be a significant shortage in the next 10 to 15 years.

  • Assessing the Plastic Surgery workforce: a template for the future of Plastic Surgery.
    Plastic and reconstructive surgery, 2010
    Co-Authors: Rod J. Rohrich, Mary H. Mcgrath, W. Thomas Lawrence, Jamil Ahmad
    Abstract:

    Background:The American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) formed the Plastic Surgery Workforce Task Force to study the size of the Plastic Surgery workforce and make recommendations about future workforce needs. The ASPS member workforce survey and two supplementary surveys of Plastic Surgery acade

Rod J. Rohrich - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Assessing the Plastic Surgery workforce: A template for the future of Plastic Surgery
    Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 2010
    Co-Authors: Rod J. Rohrich, Mary H. Mcgrath, W. Thomas Lawrence, Jamil Ahmad
    Abstract:

    Background: The American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) formed the Plastic Surgery Workforce Task Force to study the size of the Plastic Surgery workforce and make recommendations about future workforce needs. The ASPS member workforce survey and two supplementary surveys of Plastic Surgery academic chairs and senior residents were developed to gain insights on current and projected demand for Plastic Surgery procedures and to find out more about Plastic surgeons' current daily practice patterns and plans for the future. Methods: The ASPS member workforce survey was mailed to 2500 randomly selected ASPS active members practicing in the United States, and a second mailing was sent to 388 unique members who practice in an academic setting; a total of 1256 surgeons responded (43.5 percent response rate). The survey of academic chairs was distributed to 103 attendees at the annual meeting of the Association of Academic Chairmen of Plastic Surgery, and 74 returned the survey (71.8 percent response rate). The survey of senior residents was e-mailed to 183 graduating residents, of whom 65 responded (35.5 percent response rate). Results: Useful demographic information regarding the current Plastic Surgery workforce was obtained from these surveys. In addition, insight into current trends in practice composition and procedural demand was gained. Conclusions: The rapid growth of the U.S. population, combined with a significant number of Plastic surgeons approaching retirement and an unchanged number of Plastic Surgery residency training positions, will lead to a discrepancy between the demand for Plastic Surgery procedures and the supply of appropriately trained physicians. Without an increase in the number of Plastic surgeons trained each year, there will be a significant shortage in the next 10 to 15 years.

  • Assessing the Plastic Surgery workforce: a template for the future of Plastic Surgery.
    Plastic and reconstructive surgery, 2010
    Co-Authors: Rod J. Rohrich, Mary H. Mcgrath, W. Thomas Lawrence, Jamil Ahmad
    Abstract:

    Background:The American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) formed the Plastic Surgery Workforce Task Force to study the size of the Plastic Surgery workforce and make recommendations about future workforce needs. The ASPS member workforce survey and two supplementary surveys of Plastic Surgery acade

Maurice Y. Nahabedian - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Michigan Manual of Plastic Surgery
    Annals of Surgery, 2006
    Co-Authors: Maurice Y. Nahabedian
    Abstract:

    The Michigan Manual of Plastic Surgery is a comprehensive, up-to-date, and easy to read book that will be a useful resource for information. This book is organized into 10 sections and 54 chapters that cover the full spectrum of Plastic and reconstructive Surgery. The chapters have been prepared in an outline format with relevant tables and schematic illustrations and are concluded by “pearls.” The information is easily retrievable and literally at one's fingertips. This method of organization is usually very effective because it facilitates the acquisition of factual information. In addition, it is compact, light-weight, and easy to carry. The sections on hand and upper extremity, craniofacial, and head and neck were exceptionally useful because they organized large amounts of relevant information in a format that will eliminate the need for duplication. The affordability of this manual should also promote its distribution. Another attribute of the Michigan Manual of Plastic Surgery is that it is authored entirely by current and former residents; thus, it has been designed to target and assist those individuals that are students of or are reviewing essential elements of Plastic Surgery. The book is essentially a “core-curriculum” of Plastic Surgery and will serve as an excellent resource for medical students, residents, fellows, and surgeons. It will be a useful study guide for medical students learning about Plastic Surgery, residents and fellows preparing for the Plastic Surgery in-service examination, written boards, and oral boards, as well as board certified Plastic surgeons preparing for the recertification examination.

  • Plastic Surgery: Technique or Discipline?
    Plastic and reconstructive surgery, 2006
    Co-Authors: Maurice Y. Nahabedian
    Abstract:

    The definition of “Plastic Surgery” has been subject to a variety of interpretations. To the practitioner who has completed formal training in Plastic Surgery, it is defined and inherently recognized as a specialty that encompasses a vast body of knowledge and that requires a comprehension of fundamental principles and concepts that allows one to plan and execute a particular operation. In other words, it represents a discipline. To the practitioner who has not completed formal training in Plastic Surgery, it is often defined literally as the ability to mold or create. In other words, it represents a technique. These varying interpretations are creating a milieu for surgeons who have not completed a formal residency in Plastic Surgery to impinge on the specialty with the effect of misleading patients and creating a foundation for poor outcomes. The purpose of this editorial is to educate individuals who are of the opinion that Plastic Surgery is a technique that can be performed by anyone. The timeliness of this editorial is in response to the noticeable increase in the number of practitioners who are interested in performing operations that are inherently within the domain of Plastic Surgery. Many of these practitioners are board certified in specialties other than Plastic Surgery, and all of them have one denominator in common: none of them have completed a residency in Plastic Surgery as defined by the American Board of Medical Specialties.1 This phenomenon is not new, especially among the specialties somewhat related to Plastic Surgery in which there is some degree of technical overlap. This editorial is not directed at practitioners of those specialties, because many of the fundamental concepts and principles that are used to solve complex problems are similar. This editorial is directed to practitioners within specialties that are completely unrelated to Plastic Surgery in terms of training requirements and practice profile. It is recognized that the number of individuals who violate the boundaries of their specialty is small; however, they do exist, and they are making their interests and intentions known. Although there are a number of operations that are vulnerable to encroachment, the focus of this editorial is on reconstructive and aesthetic Surgery of the breast. I have had the experience of dealing with this unpleasant issue regarding boundaries on several occasions. I will elaborate on three. At a recent national symposium, I was approached by a surgeon who was interested in learning how to perform certain cosmetic and reconstructive operations related to the breast. He asked if I would be agreeable and allow him to spend 1 or 2 weeks with me in the operating room. When asked why women in need of reconstructive breast Surgery were not referred to a Plastic surgeon, the response was that there were no Plastic surgeons in the community. This practitioner believed that women within his community would be better served by him providing services that were not currently available. While his intention may have been genuine, I had serious reservations and declined the request, based on the fact that this surgeon had not received formal training in Plastic Surgery and was therefore not qualified to perform it. It was clear, however, that he felt otherwise and proceeded to convey that the “techniques” would be relatively easy to learn and perform. In another example, I was contacted by an attorney to see whether I would be willing to review a legal case for the defense involving a boardcertified physician who had performed a reduction mammaplasty. The patient decided to litigate because of complications and a poor outcome. Further questioning revealed that this board-certified physician was a dermatologist who had additional certification from the American Board of Cosmetic Surgery.2 I explained to the attorney that it would be difficult to defend this case, because it was performed by a dermatologist who had not received formal training in Plastic Surgery and that the American Board of Cosmetic Surgery was not a board that was recognized by the American Board of Medical Specialties. Received for publication November 21, 2005; accepted January 10, 2006. Copyright ©2006 by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons

Mary H. Mcgrath - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The Plastic Surgery milestone project.
    Journal of graduate medical education, 2014
    Co-Authors: Mary H. Mcgrath
    Abstract:

    The Milestone Project in Plastic Surgery was created to define training outcomes and measure progress as a trainee progresses from novice to expert. The Plastic Surgery Milestones represent a framework with graduated measures to ensure the learner and program faculty know the expected intermediate and long-term competencies, and can more accurately measure where an individual is on the expected trajectory of attainment of competence along this continuum. The Plastic Surgery Milestones also define the end point of formal training at which a resident or fellow has the clinical experience to be ready for unsupervised practice in the specialty.

  • Assessing the Plastic Surgery workforce: A template for the future of Plastic Surgery
    Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 2010
    Co-Authors: Rod J. Rohrich, Mary H. Mcgrath, W. Thomas Lawrence, Jamil Ahmad
    Abstract:

    Background: The American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) formed the Plastic Surgery Workforce Task Force to study the size of the Plastic Surgery workforce and make recommendations about future workforce needs. The ASPS member workforce survey and two supplementary surveys of Plastic Surgery academic chairs and senior residents were developed to gain insights on current and projected demand for Plastic Surgery procedures and to find out more about Plastic surgeons' current daily practice patterns and plans for the future. Methods: The ASPS member workforce survey was mailed to 2500 randomly selected ASPS active members practicing in the United States, and a second mailing was sent to 388 unique members who practice in an academic setting; a total of 1256 surgeons responded (43.5 percent response rate). The survey of academic chairs was distributed to 103 attendees at the annual meeting of the Association of Academic Chairmen of Plastic Surgery, and 74 returned the survey (71.8 percent response rate). The survey of senior residents was e-mailed to 183 graduating residents, of whom 65 responded (35.5 percent response rate). Results: Useful demographic information regarding the current Plastic Surgery workforce was obtained from these surveys. In addition, insight into current trends in practice composition and procedural demand was gained. Conclusions: The rapid growth of the U.S. population, combined with a significant number of Plastic surgeons approaching retirement and an unchanged number of Plastic Surgery residency training positions, will lead to a discrepancy between the demand for Plastic Surgery procedures and the supply of appropriately trained physicians. Without an increase in the number of Plastic surgeons trained each year, there will be a significant shortage in the next 10 to 15 years.

  • Assessing the Plastic Surgery workforce: a template for the future of Plastic Surgery.
    Plastic and reconstructive surgery, 2010
    Co-Authors: Rod J. Rohrich, Mary H. Mcgrath, W. Thomas Lawrence, Jamil Ahmad
    Abstract:

    Background:The American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) formed the Plastic Surgery Workforce Task Force to study the size of the Plastic Surgery workforce and make recommendations about future workforce needs. The ASPS member workforce survey and two supplementary surveys of Plastic Surgery acade

  • Plastic Surgery and the teenage patient
    Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology, 2000
    Co-Authors: Mary H. Mcgrath, Sanjay Mukerji
    Abstract:

    Over the past year, the media have reported an increase in the number of teenagers undergoing Plastic Surgery, and with a tone of faint alarm have suggested that this merits some cultural self-scrutiny. This paper presents the statistics on the number and types of Plastic Surgery operations done in teenagers over the last eight years and discusses these in the context of cultural influences and societal concepts of beauty. The reason to have Plastic Surgery is psychological and involves body image, which is defined as the subjective perception of the body as it is seen through the mind's eye. To explain why changing the external appearance affects personality and behavior, the complex psychological reactions that occur after an operation that alters the size or shape of a body part are reviewed. Body image development occurs in stages, and puberty stands out as a particularly sensitive time as the teenager undergoes major changes in his or her physical appearance and does this at a time of heightened vulnerability to the opinion of others. Plastic Surgery to correct a truly unattractive feature is enormously successful and remarkably free of conflict in this population. Teenagers undergo a rapid reorganization of their self-image after Plastic Surgery with subsequent positive changes in behavior and interpersonal interactions. The key to achieving success with Plastic Surgery is patient selection. The core value of the Surgery lies not in the objective beauty of the visible result, but in the patient's opinion of and response to the change. Good patient management includes selecting candidates with clear and realistic expectations who are free of psychopathology. There must be true informed consent and attention to psychological issues must continue into the postoperative period. It is the responsibility of the patient's physician and Plastic surgeon to recognize a need for psychiatric evaluation and to help the patient get this as needed. The eight operations most commonly done in the teenage population are rhinoplasty, ear Surgery, reduction mammoplasty, Surgery for asymmetric breasts, excision of gynecomastia, augmentation mammoplasty, chin augmentation, and suction assisted lipoplasty. Each of these is reviewed with regard to techniques, expectations, risks, and logistics. Guidelines for timing the referral of teenage patients for Plastic Surgery evaluation are given.

Georges N. Tabbal - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Patient safety in Plastic Surgery
    Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 2012
    Co-Authors: Andrew P Trussler, Georges N. Tabbal
    Abstract:

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES: After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Recognize risk factors for venous thromboembolism and identify patients who would benefit from prophylactic anticoagulation; 2. Describe the effects of hypothermia in the perioperative period. 3. Understand the importance of blood pressure control in the Plastic Surgery patient.\n\nSUMMARY: This article provides a summary of important factors that contribute to improved patient safety in Plastic Surgery. The identification of patients and procedures that have an increased risk of complications enables the physician to carry out prophylactic measures to reduce the rate of these complications. Venous thromboembolism, hypothermia, bleeding diathesis, and perioperative hypertension are identifiable risks of Plastic Surgery, which can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. An evidence-based system and individual practice measures can help to decrease these risks. Thorough preoperative patient evaluation, detailed informed consent, and perioperative care delivered in a safe environment can contribute to improved safety in Plastic Surgery.