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Survivorship

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Survivorship - Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Larissa Nekhlyudov - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • developing a novel model to improve research and care for cancer survivors a feasibility study
    Journal of Cancer Education, 2019
    Co-Authors: Shoshana M Rosenberg, Larissa Nekhlyudov, Jennifer A Ligibel, Jeffrey A Meyerhardt, Eric D Jacobsen, Judy Garber, Craig A Bunnell, Patricia Nutting, Kim Sprunckharrild
    Abstract:

    Despite a growing number of clinical trials and supportive care programs for cancer survivors, recruitment of patients for these opportunities during the Survivorship phase of care is challenging. We piloted a novel process to systematically educate patients about available research studies and supportive care programs as part of a Survivorship care visit. Between 3/2015 and 8/2015, patients seen in the Adult Survivorship Program who had not previously received a treatment summary and Survivorship care plan (TS/SCP) were provided with one accompanied by a list of Survivorship research studies and care programs tailored to their diagnosis. Survivorship providers discussed the opportunities and recorded whether the patient was interested in relevant studies and placed referrals to study staff. Following the visit, we tracked study enrollment and surveyed patients about their experience. Fifty of 56 (89%) pilot participants completed the survey. Almost all (98%) reported that the TS/SCP visit and document helped with knowledge of research opportunities and supportive care interventions. Following receipt of the TS/SCP, 44% were interested in at least one study and in further follow-up with research staff. Of the 30 survivors eligible for at least one study, 6 (20%) have enrolled in at least one study to date. This pilot program demonstrates that the systematic sharing of available clinical studies and supportive care programming as part of a Survivorship care plan visit is feasible and well received by cancer survivors and may facilitate and enhance accrual to clinical trials in the Survivorship phase of care.

  • provision and discussion of Survivorship care plans among cancer survivors results of a nationally representative survey of oncologists and primary care physicians
    Journal of Clinical Oncology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Danielle Blanchhartigan, Laura P Forsythe, Catherine M Alfano, Tenbroeck Smith, Larissa Nekhlyudov, Patricia A Ganz, Julia H Rowland
    Abstract:

    Purpose Survivorship care planning should involve discussions between providers and cancer survivors to address survivors’ needs and optimize adherence. We examined the frequency and factors associated with oncologists’ and primary care physicians’ (PCPs) reports of provision of written Survivorship care plans (SCPs) and discussion of Survivorship care recommendations with survivors. Methods A nationally representative sample of 1,130 oncologists and 1,020 PCPs was surveyed about Survivorship care practices with survivors. Logistic regression models predicted multilevel factors associated with providing SCPs or discussing recommendations with survivors. Results Although a majority of oncologists (64%) reported always/almost always discussing Survivorship care recommendations with survivors, fewer also discussed who survivors should see for cancer-related and other follow-up care (32%); fewer still also provided a written SCP to the survivor ( 5%). Survivorship care recommendations and provider responsibility were not regularly discussed by PCPs and survivors (12%). Oncologists who reported detailed training about late and long-term effects of cancer were more likely to provide written SCPs (odds ratio [OR], 1.73; 95% CI, 1.22 to 2.44) and discuss Survivorship care planning with survivors (OR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.51 to 2.70). PCPs who received SCPs from oncologists were 9 more likely (95% CI, 5.74 to 14.82) to report Survivorship discussions with survivors. Conclusion A minority of both PCPs and oncologists reported consistently discussing and providing SCPs to cancer survivors. Training and knowledge specific to Survivorship care and coordinated care between PCPs and oncologists were associated with increased Survivorship discussions with survivors. These nationally representative data provide a useful benchmark to assess implementation of new efforts to improve the follow-up care of survivors. J Clin Oncol 32:1578-1585. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology

Heather E. Leeper - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The Role of Survivorship Care for Patients with Glioma.
    Seminars in oncology nursing, 2018
    Co-Authors: Casey B. Brown, Heather E. Leeper
    Abstract:

    Objectives To discuss the role of Survivorship care and Survivorship care plans, including a recently developed neuro-oncology–specific plan care ( https://www.soc-neuro-onc.org/SNO/Resources/Survivorship_Care_Plan.aspx ) for adult patients diagnosed with primary glial neoplasms and the necessary educational needs of oncology nurses. Data Sources Published peer-reviewed literature and resources from cancer and neuro-oncology professional organizations and patient advocacy organizations. Conclusion The current Commission on Cancer mandates adult cancer patients treated with curative intent each receive an individualized Survivorship care plan. Patients with glioma are likely to benefit from receiving Survivorship care, including Survivorship care plans aimed at addressing the complex and evolving needs of this unique patient population throughout their illness trajectory. Implications for Nursing Practice Nurse professionals are critical to the development and implementation of cancer Survivorship care. This growing leadership role presents oncology nurses with specific and new educational needs regarding Survivorship care.

  • Survivorship care planning and implementation in neuro-oncology.
    Neuro-oncology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Heather E. Leeper, Kathrin Milbury
    Abstract:

    Survivorship has become a significant topic within oncologic care. The tools and means by which the provision of Survivorship care can be implemented and delivered are in development and are the focus of significant research oncology-wide. These tools and methods include innovations of Survivorship care delivery, Survivorship care plans, and improving communication among all stakeholders in an individual patient's care as the means to elevate health-related quality of life. The merits of these Survivorship care provisions in the field of neuro-oncology and its patients' exigent need for more patient-centric care focused on living with their illness are discussed. Since 2014 there has been a mandate within the United States for adult cancer patients treated with curative intent to receive Survivorship care plans, comprising a treatment summary and a follow-up plan, intended to facilitate patients' care after initial diagnosis and upfront treatment. Several cancer-specific Survivorship care plans have been developed and endorsed by health care professional organizations and patient advocacy groups. A Survivorship care plan specific for neuro-oncology has been collaboratively developed by a multidisciplinary and interprofessional committee; it is endorsed by the Society for Neuro-Oncology Guidelines Committee. It is available as open access for download from the Society for Neuro-Oncology website under "Resources": https://www.soc-neuro-onc.org/SNO/Resources/Survivorship_Care_Plan.aspx. Survivorship care offers an opportunity to begin directly addressing the range of issues patients navigate throughout their illness trajectory, an oncology initiative to which neuro-oncology patients both need and deserve equitable access.

  • Survivorship care planning in neuro-oncology
    Neuro-oncology practice, 2018
    Co-Authors: Heather E. Leeper, Alvina Acquaye, Susan Bell, Jennifer Clarke, Deborah Forst, Nadia N. Laack, Michael J. Link, Jennie Taylor, Terri Armstrong
    Abstract:

    Cancer patient Survivorship has become a significant topic within oncology care for both adult and pediatric patients. Starting in 2005, the Institute of Medicine recommended the use of Survivorship care plans to assist patients transitioning from active treatment to the posttreatment phase of their cancer care, a critical time for many patients. Since 2014 there has been a mandate within the United States for adult cancer patients treated with curative intent to receive Survivorship care plans comprised of a treatment summary and a follow-up plan to facilitate a better understanding among patients of what to expect after treatment. In addition to a general oncology Survivorship care plan, specific care plans have been created for breast, lung, prostate, and colon cancers, as well as lymphoma. A Survivorship care plan specific to adult neuro-oncology has been developed by a multidisciplinary and interprofessional committee, with approval from the Society for Neuro-Oncology Guidelines Committee. It has been published in compendium with this review of Survivorship care planning and available as a fillable PDF on the Society of Neuro-Oncology Guidelines Endorsement web page (https://www.soc-neuro-onc.org/SNO/Resources/Survivorship_Care_Plan.aspx). Implementation of this Survivorship care plan provides a unique opportunity to begin addressing the range of Survivorship issues our neuro-oncology patients navigate from diagnosis to end of life.

Lisa D. Mims - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Cancer Survivorship training in family medicine residency programs
    Journal of cancer survivorship : research and practice, 2020
    Co-Authors: Sarah Tucker Price, Carole R Berini, Dean Seehusen, Lisa D. Mims
    Abstract:

    Purpose The objective of the study was to examine current family medicine residency education in cancer Survivorship and barriers to cancer Survivorship education in the residency curriculum. Methods Family medicine residency program directors (n = 628) were surveyed electronically between September 2019 and November 2019 through the Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) annual program directory survey. Respondents (n = 250) answered questions regarding eventual cancer Survivorship curriculum in their residency program, including interest and barriers to implementation. Program characteristics were assessed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results Only 9.2% of family medicine residency program directors reported having a cancer Survivorship curriculum. Sixty-nine percent of program directors reported they would implement a cancer Survivorship curriculum if one was available. The most significant barrier to implementation of a cancer Survivorship curriculum was insufficient time (39.6%) followed by lack of faculty expertise (26.9%). Respondents that reported lack of faculty expertise as a barrier to implementation of cancer Survivorship training were more likely be report that they would be willing to implement a cancer Survivorship curriculum (p Conclusions Despite the majority of primary care physicians providing care to cancer survivors, few family medicine residency programs have formal training in cancer Survivorship care. There is interest in expanding family medicine residency training in cancer Survivorship care among program directors. Implications for cancer survivors Gaining insight into the current educational curriculum and barriers to cancer Survivorship training will lead to opportunities to improve residency training, and ultimately provide better care to cancer survivors in primary care settings.

  • Cancer Survivorship training in family medicine residency programs
    Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 2020
    Co-Authors: Sarah Tucker Price, Carole R Berini, Dean Seehusen, Lisa D. Mims
    Abstract:

    Purpose The objective of the study was to examine current family medicine residency education in cancer Survivorship and barriers to cancer Survivorship education in the residency curriculum. Methods Family medicine residency program directors ( n  = 628) were surveyed electronically between September 2019 and November 2019 through the Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) annual program directory survey. Respondents ( n  = 250) answered questions regarding eventual cancer Survivorship curriculum in their residency program, including interest and barriers to implementation. Program characteristics were assessed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results Only 9.2% of family medicine residency program directors reported having a cancer Survivorship curriculum. Sixty-nine percent of program directors reported they would implement a cancer Survivorship curriculum if one was available. The most significant barrier to implementation of a cancer Survivorship curriculum was insufficient time (39.6%) followed by lack of faculty expertise (26.9%). Respondents that reported lack of faculty expertise as a barrier to implementation of cancer Survivorship training were more likely be report that they would be willing to implement a cancer Survivorship curriculum ( p  

Rebecca Graves - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Breast cancer Survivorship in rural settings: a systematic review
    Supportive Care in Cancer, 2020
    Co-Authors: Allison Brandt Anbari, Ausanee Wanchai, Rebecca Graves
    Abstract:

    Purpose Rural breast cancer survivors (BCS) in the United States face unique challenges during Survivorship, related to knowledge and accessibility of resources. Survivorship care plans should address five key areas that include surveillance and screening for new/reoccurring cancer; management of long-term effects of cancer treatment; health promotion; and care coordination/practice implications. To maximize the benefit of Survivorship care for rural BCS, it is necessary to better understand their experiences and preferences. Methods A systematic review of the extant literature addressing the Survivorship needs and interventions for rural BCS was conducted. The following databases were searched for reports published between January, 2007, and December, 2018: PubMed, CINAHL, SCOPUS, PsycINFO (EBSCO), CAB Direct, and Sociological Abstracts. Reports published after 2007 with samples including and comprised of rural BCS in the United States were included. Screening of the search results followed PRISMA guidelines using Covidence systematic review software. Results Findings were extracted from 30 reports disseminating findings of 14 research studies. The five areas of a Survivorship care were counted/accounted for during data extraction. The included reports concentrated on health promotion (e.g., weight loss and exercise) and the management of long-term effects of cancer treatment as key outcomes. There is a gap in the literature addressing care coordination, surveillance, and screening. Conclusion Additional research including interventions for rural BCS that address more Survivorship care areas would benefit this population and improve Survivorship quality of life for rural BCS.

Mandi Pratt-chapman - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Identifying patients' priorities for quality Survivorship: conceptualizing a patient-centered approach to Survivorship care.
    Journal of cancer survivorship : research and practice, 2020
    Co-Authors: K. Holly Mead, Sarah Raskin, Anne Willis, Hannah Arem, Sarah Murtaza, Laura Charney, Mandi Pratt-chapman
    Abstract:

    This study explored cancer survivors’ experiences with and priorities for cancer Survivorship care to describe a patient-centered approach to quality Survivorship care. We conducted 22 focus groups with 170 adult survivors of breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer from six cities across the country and online. We used thematic analysis to identify participants’ principles and priorities for quality Survivorship care. Based on our analysis of a limited group of cancer survivors, we identified two core principles that underlie participants’ expectations for Survivorship care and 11 practice priorities that reflect opportunities to improve patient-centeredness at the individual, interpersonal, and organizational levels. The principles reflect participants’ desire to be better prepared for and equipped to accept and manage their chronic care needs post-cancer treatment. The priorities reflect practices that patients, providers, and cancer centers can engage in to ensure survivors’ goals for post-treatment care are met. Results from the study suggest the need to expand conceptualization of high-quality Survivorship care. The survivor principles and practice priorities identified in this study challenge the field to organize a more patient-centered Survivorship care system that empowers and respects patients and provides a holistic approach to survivors’ chronic and long-term needs. Quality cancer Survivorship care must reflect patients’ priorities. The findings from this study can be used to develop a patient-centered framework for Survivorship care that can be used in conjunction with quality guidelines to ensure Survivorship care is organized to achieve both clinical and patient-centered outcomes.

  • Identifying patients’ priorities for quality Survivorship: conceptualizing a patient-centered approach to Survivorship care
    Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 2020
    Co-Authors: K. Holly Mead, Sarah Raskin, Anne Willis, Hannah Arem, Sarah Murtaza, Laura Charney, Mandi Pratt-chapman
    Abstract:

    Purpose This study explored cancer survivors’ experiences with and priorities for cancer Survivorship care to describe a patient-centered approach to quality Survivorship care. Methods We conducted 22 focus groups with 170 adult survivors of breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer from six cities across the country and online. We used thematic analysis to identify participants’ principles and priorities for quality Survivorship care. Results Based on our analysis of a limited group of cancer survivors, we identified two core principles that underlie participants’ expectations for Survivorship care and 11 practice priorities that reflect opportunities to improve patient-centeredness at the individual, interpersonal, and organizational levels. The principles reflect participants’ desire to be better prepared for and equipped to accept and manage their chronic care needs post-cancer treatment. The priorities reflect practices that patients, providers, and cancer centers can engage in to ensure survivors’ goals for post-treatment care are met. Conclusions Results from the study suggest the need to expand conceptualization of high-quality Survivorship care. The survivor principles and practice priorities identified in this study challenge the field to organize a more patient-centered Survivorship care system that empowers and respects patients and provides a holistic approach to survivors’ chronic and long-term needs. Implications for Cancer Survivors Quality cancer Survivorship care must reflect patients’ priorities. The findings from this study can be used to develop a patient-centered framework for Survivorship care that can be used in conjunction with quality guidelines to ensure Survivorship care is organized to achieve both clinical and patient-centered outcomes.

  • Survivorship NAVIGATION OUTCOME MEASURES: A report from the ACS Patient Navigation Working Group on Survivorship Navigation
    Cancer, 2011
    Co-Authors: Mandi Pratt-chapman, Melissa A. Simon, Angela K. Patterson, Betsy Risendal, Steven R. Patierno
    Abstract:

    Survivorship navigation is a relatively new concept in the field of patient navigation but an important one. This article highlights the essential functions of the Survivorship navigator and defines core outcomes and measures for navigation in the Survivorship period. Barriers to access to care experienced by patients during active cancer treatment can continue into the post-treatment period, affecting quality follow-up care for survivors. These barriers to care can be particularly acute for non-English speakers, immigrants, the uninsured, the underinsured, and other vulnerable populations. The Survivorship navigator can help reduce barriers and facilitate access to Survivorship care and services through communication and information exchange for patients. Survivorship navigation may improve appropriate health care utilization through education and care coordination, potentially improving health outcomes and quality of life of survivors while reducing cost to the health care system. Survivorship navigators can also educate survivors on how to improve their overall wellness, thereby directly impacting the health of a growing population of cancer survivors.