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Thermal Comfort

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Noël Djongyang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Thermal Comfort a review paper
    Renewable & Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2010
    Co-Authors: Noël Djongyang, Rene Tchinda, Donatien Njomo
    Abstract:

    This paper presents a literature review of Thermal Comfort. Both rational and adaptive Thermal Comfort approaches are presented. An overview of the human body thermoregulatory system as well as the mathematical modelling of heat exchanged between human body and its environment in the situations of both awaked and sleeping people is presented.

  • Thermal Comfort: A review paper
    Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2010
    Co-Authors: Noël Djongyang, Rene Tchinda, Donatien Njomo
    Abstract:

    This paper presents a literature review of Thermal Comfort. Both rational and adaptive Thermal Comfort approaches are presented. An overview of the human body thermoregulatory system as well as the mathematical modelling of heat exchanged between human body and its environment in the situations of both awaked and sleeping people is presented. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Donatien Njomo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Thermal Comfort a review paper
    Renewable & Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2010
    Co-Authors: Noël Djongyang, Rene Tchinda, Donatien Njomo
    Abstract:

    This paper presents a literature review of Thermal Comfort. Both rational and adaptive Thermal Comfort approaches are presented. An overview of the human body thermoregulatory system as well as the mathematical modelling of heat exchanged between human body and its environment in the situations of both awaked and sleeping people is presented.

  • Thermal Comfort: A review paper
    Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2010
    Co-Authors: Noël Djongyang, Rene Tchinda, Donatien Njomo
    Abstract:

    This paper presents a literature review of Thermal Comfort. Both rational and adaptive Thermal Comfort approaches are presented. An overview of the human body thermoregulatory system as well as the mathematical modelling of heat exchanged between human body and its environment in the situations of both awaked and sleeping people is presented. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Nazanin Nasrollahi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Surveyed Thermal Comfort in Iranian Offices
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Nazanin Nasrollahi, Ian Paul Knight, Phil Jones
    Abstract:

    SUMMARY This paper presents the findings of a short-term monitoring exercise and questionnaire survey to assess the Thermal Comfort conditions actually being achieved in 6 Iranian Office buildings. The findings of the questionnaire and monitoring are compared to give confidence that the questionnaire is accurately reflecting the calculated Comfort conditions obtained from the physically monitoring and site observations. The perceived Thermal Comfort conditions for the buildings are then compared with current Thermal Comfort standards to ascertain whether there is potential for improvement. The results from this study indicate that there is a good agreement between the monitoring and the questionnaire for the majority of the offices. The results also show that there appears to be room for significant improvement in Thermal Comfort conditions in a number of the Case Studies. These findings will be used as part of further work to explore how we might improve the Thermal conditions through improvements to the Offices fabric design.

  • Thermal Comfort in hospitals – A literature review
    Renewable & Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2012
    Co-Authors: Jamal Khodakarami, Nazanin Nasrollahi
    Abstract:

    In general, there is a wide range of literature covering the area of Thermal Comfort, but not a focused literature review of Thermal Comfort in hospitals has published yet. However, there has been no study on the direct effect of Thermal Comfort on health. The authors have found a reasonable amount of literature in Thermal Comfort in hospitals. This paper presents a literature review on Thermal Comfort in hospitals. From the review, the paper concludes that it is important to undertake original studies in the relationship between Thermal Comfort conditions and productivity for hospital staff. The study finally concluded that it is important to find some solutions to reconcile the different Thermal Comfort conditions required by different occupants in hospitals. These solutions could be used whenever patients and the attending caregivers have to stay in one room for a long time compulsorily.

  • Thermal Comfort in hospitals – A literature review
    Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2012
    Co-Authors: Jamal Khodakarami, Nazanin Nasrollahi
    Abstract:

    In general, there is a wide range of literature covering the area of Thermal Comfort, but not a focused literature review of Thermal Comfort in hospitals has published yet. However, there has been no study on the direct effect of Thermal Comfort on health. The authors have found a reasonable amount of literature in Thermal Comfort in hospitals. This paper presents a literature review on Thermal Comfort in hospitals. From the review, the paper concludes that it is important to undertake original studies in the relationship between Thermal Comfort conditions and productivity for hospital staff. The study finally concluded that it is important to find some solutions to reconcile the different Thermal Comfort conditions required by different occupants in hospitals. These solutions could be used whenever patients and the attending caregivers have to stay in one room for a long time compulsorily. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All right reserved.

Akihiro Tamura – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Thermal Comfort in urban transitional spaces
    Building and Environment, 2005
    Co-Authors: Chungyoon Chun, Akihiro Tamura
    Abstract:

    This paper deals with Thermal Comfort in urban transitional spaces. This topic investigates Thermal Comfort during walking activities through transitional spaces-urban corridors, shopping streets, and open-ended passageways. The study involves a field study and a laboratory study with a sequenced walk through an environmental control chamber. Subjects in both studies wore the same clothing ensembles, walked the same speed, and evaluated their Thermal Comfort at 20 designated points in the field and in specific rooms in the control chamber. Air temperature, relative humidity, and air velocity were measured concurrently as the Thermal Comfort votes completed. Findings revealed that the previously experienced temperatures determined Thermal Comfort at the following point in the sequence. Because Thermal Comfort at a point can be influenced widely by relative placement of temperatures in sequence, Thermal Comfort in transitional spaces can be adapted very widely compared to Comfort inside of buildings. Thermal Comfort along the experimental courses was evaluated by averaging the temperature of a course.

  • Thermal Comfort in urban transitional spaces
    Building and Environment, 2005
    Co-Authors: Chungyoon Chun, Akihiro Tamura
    Abstract:

    This paper deals with Thermal Comfort in urban transitional spaces. This topic investigates Thermal Comfort during walking activities through transitional spaces-urban corridors, shopping streets, and open-ended passageways. The study involves a field study and a laboratory study with a sequenced walk through an environmental control chamber. Subjects in both studies wore the same clothing ensembles, walked the same speed, and evaluated their Thermal Comfort at 20 designated points in the field and in specific rooms in the control chamber. Air temperature, relative humidity, and air velocity were measured concurrently as the Thermal Comfort votes completed. Findings revealed that the previously experienced temperatures determined Thermal Comfort at the following point in the sequence. Because Thermal Comfort at a point can be influenced widely by relative placement of temperatures in sequence, Thermal Comfort in transitional spaces can be adapted very widely compared to Comfort inside of buildings. Thermal Comfort along the experimental courses was evaluated by averaging the temperature of a course. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

P. G. Luscuere – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Constructing Thermal Comfort: Investigating the effect of vegetation on indoor Thermal Comfort through a four season Thermal Comfort quasi-experiment
    Building and Environment, 2014
    Co-Authors: Graziella Mangone, Stanley Kurvers, P. G. Luscuere
    Abstract:

    Abstract Several short term studies have found evidence that plants may improve occupant Thermal Comfort, yet this phenomena has not yet been rigorously evaluated. The aim of this paper is to present the results of a quasi-experiment that evaluated the effect of indoor plants on the Thermal Comfort of 67 office workers within an office building in De Lier, The Netherlands, for four months, one month each season, in 2013. The participants’ Thermal Comfort was recorded twice a day, while the globe temperature, relative humidity, and light levels of the workspaces were monitored. The indoor operative temperature of the test rooms were varied between typical and more extreme indoor operative temperature ranges throughout the quasi-experiment in a controlled manner. The presence of a substantial quantity of plants in the work environment was found to have a significant effect on the Thermal Comfort of the participants. For example, the occupants of the two rooms in which the presence of plants was alternated, were both, on average, approximately 12.0% more Thermally Comfortable when plants were present in the room. In addition, they were approximately 1.79 and 1.95 times more likely to be Thermally Comfortable when plants were present in the room, respectively. These results indicate that the incorporation of a substantial quantity of plants in office buildings can lead to reduced building energy consumption and carbon emission rates, by allowing the temperature setpoint to be raised in the summer and lowered in the winter.

  • Constructing Thermal Comfort: Investigating the effect of vegetation on indoor Thermal Comfort through a four season Thermal Comfort quasi-experiment
    Building and Environment, 2014
    Co-Authors: Graziella Mangone, Stanley Kurvers, P. G. Luscuere
    Abstract:

    Several short term studies have found evidence that plants may improve occupant Thermal Comfort, yet this phenomena has not yet been rigorously evaluated. The aim of this paper is to present the results of a quasi-experiment that evaluated the effect of indoor plants on the Thermal Comfort of 67 office workers within an office building in De Lier, The Netherlands, for four months, one month each season, in 2013.The participants’ Thermal Comfort was recorded twice a day, while the globe temperature, relative humidity, and light levels of the workspaces were monitored. The indoor operative temperature of the test rooms were varied between typical and more extreme indoor operative temperature ranges throughout the quasi-experiment in a controlled manner.The presence of a substantial quantity of plants in the work environment was found to have a significant effect on the Thermal Comfort of the participants. For example, the occupants of the two rooms in which the presence of plants was alternated, were both, on average, approximately 12.0% more Thermally Comfortable when plants were present in the room. In addition, they were approximately 1.79 and 1.95 times more likely to be Thermally Comfortable when plants were present in the room, respectively.These results indicate that the incorporation of a substantial quantity of plants in office buildings can lead to reduced building energy consumption and carbon emission rates, by allowing the temperature setpoint to be raised in the summer and lowered in the winter. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.