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James G Fujimoto – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • comparison of reflectivity maps and outer retinal topography in retinal disease by 3 d fourier domain optical coherence Tomography
    Optics Express, 2009
    Co-Authors: Maciej Wojtkowski, James G Fujimoto, Bartosz L Sikorski, Iwona Gorczynska, Michalina Gora, Maciej Szkulmowski, Danuta Bukowska, Jakub J Kaluzny, Andrzej Kowalczyk
    Abstract:

    We demonstrate and compare two image processing methods for visualization and analysis of three-dimensional optical coherence Tomography (OCT) data acquired in eyes with different retinal pathologies. A method of retinal layer segmentation based on a multiple intensity thresholding algorithm was implemented in order to generate simultaneously outer retinal topography maps and reflectivity maps. We compare the applicability of the two methods to the diagnosis of retinal diseases and their progression. The data presented in this contribution were acquired with a high speed (25,000 A-scans/s), high resolution (4.5 µm) spectral OCT prototype instrument operating in the ophthalmology clinic.

  • in vivo retinal imaging by optical coherence Tomography
    SPIE milestone series, 2001
    Co-Authors: Eric A Swanson, Joseph A. Izatt, David Huang, Joel S Schuman, Carmen A Puliafito, James G Fujimoto
    Abstract:

    We describe what are to our knowledge the first in vivo measurements of human retinal structure with optical coherence Tomography. These images represent the highest depth resolution in vivo retinal images to date. The tomographic system, image-processing techniques, and examples of high-resolution tomographs and their clinical relevance are discussed.

  • topography of diabetic macular edema with optical coherence Tomography
    Ophthalmology, 1998
    Co-Authors: Michael R Hee, Eric A Swanson, Joel S Schuman, Carmen A Puliafito, Elias Reichel, Jay S Duker, J G Coker, J R Wilkins, James G Fujimoto
    Abstract:

    Objective: This study aimed to develop a protocol to screen and monitor patients with diabetic macular thickening using optical coherence Tomography (OCT), a technique for high-resolution cross-sectional imaging of the retina. Design: A cross-sectional pilot study was conducted. Participants: A total of 182 eyes of 107 patients with diabetic retinopathy, 55 eyes from 31 patients with diabetes but no ophthalmoscopic evidence of retinopathy, and 73 eyes from 41 healthy volunteers were studied. Intervention: Six optical coherence tomograms were obtained in a radial spoke pattern centered on the fovea. Retinal thickness was computed automatically from each tomogram at a total of 600 locations throughout the macula. Macular thickness was displayed geographically as a false-color topographic map and was reported numerically as averages in each of nine regions. Main Outcome Measures: Correlation of OCT with slit-lamp biomicroscopy, fluorescein angiography, and visual acuity was measured. Results: Optical coherence Tomography was able to quantify the development and resolution of both foveal and extrafoveal macular thickening. The mean ± standard deviation foveal thickness was 174 ± 18 μ m in normal eyes, 179 ± 17 μ m in diabetic eyes without retinopathy, and 256 ± 114 μ m in eyes with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. Foveal thickness was highly correlated among left and right eyes of normal eyes (mean ± standard deviation difference of 6 ± 9 μ m). Foveal thickness measured by OCT correlated with visual acuity ( r 2 = 0.79). A single diabetic eye with no slit-lamp evidence of retinopathy showed abnormal foveal thickening on OCT. Conclusions: Optical coherence Tomography was a useful technique for quantifying macular thickness in patients with diabetic macular edema. The topographic mapping protocol provided geographic information on macular thickness that was intuitive and objective.

Michael R Hee – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • topography of diabetic macular edema with optical coherence Tomography
    Ophthalmology, 1998
    Co-Authors: Michael R Hee, Eric A Swanson, Joel S Schuman, Carmen A Puliafito, Elias Reichel, Jay S Duker, J G Coker, J R Wilkins, James G Fujimoto
    Abstract:

    Objective: This study aimed to develop a protocol to screen and monitor patients with diabetic macular thickening using optical coherence Tomography (OCT), a technique for high-resolution cross-sectional imaging of the retina. Design: A cross-sectional pilot study was conducted. Participants: A total of 182 eyes of 107 patients with diabetic retinopathy, 55 eyes from 31 patients with diabetes but no ophthalmoscopic evidence of retinopathy, and 73 eyes from 41 healthy volunteers were studied. Intervention: Six optical coherence tomograms were obtained in a radial spoke pattern centered on the fovea. Retinal thickness was computed automatically from each tomogram at a total of 600 locations throughout the macula. Macular thickness was displayed geographically as a false-color topographic map and was reported numerically as averages in each of nine regions. Main Outcome Measures: Correlation of OCT with slit-lamp biomicroscopy, fluorescein angiography, and visual acuity was measured. Results: Optical coherence Tomography was able to quantify the development and resolution of both foveal and extrafoveal macular thickening. The mean ± standard deviation foveal thickness was 174 ± 18 μ m in normal eyes, 179 ± 17 μ m in diabetic eyes without retinopathy, and 256 ± 114 μ m in eyes with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. Foveal thickness was highly correlated among left and right eyes of normal eyes (mean ± standard deviation difference of 6 ± 9 μ m). Foveal thickness measured by OCT correlated with visual acuity ( r 2 = 0.79). A single diabetic eye with no slit-lamp evidence of retinopathy showed abnormal foveal thickening on OCT. Conclusions: Optical coherence Tomography was a useful technique for quantifying macular thickness in patients with diabetic macular edema. The topographic mapping protocol provided geographic information on macular thickness that was intuitive and objective.

  • optical coherence Tomography of central serous chorioretinopathy
    American Journal of Ophthalmology, 1995
    Co-Authors: Eric A Swanson, Joel S Schuman, Carmen A Puliafito, Michael R Hee, Carlton Wong, Elias Reichel, Jay S Duker, James G Fujimoto
    Abstract:

    Purpose To assess the potential of a new imaging technique, optical coherence Tomography, for the diagnosis and monitoring of central serous chorioretinopathy. Optical coherence Tomography is a novel noninvasive, noncontact imaging modality that produces high longitudinal resolution, cross-sectional tomographs of ocular tissue. Methods Optical coherence Tomography is analogous to ultrasound, except that it uses light rather than sound to obtain higher image resolution in the retina. Cross-sectional tomographs of optical reflectivity within the retina are produced with longitudinal resolution of 10 μm. Optical coherence Tomography was used to examine 16 patients at a referral eye center whose initial examination disclosed the clinical diagnosis of central serous chorioretinopathy. The optical coherence Tomography results were correlated with slit-lamp biomicroscopy, fundus photography, and fluorescein angiography. Results The cross-sectional view produced by optical coherence Tomography was effective in objectively quantifying the amount of serous retinal detachment in the disease. Optical coherence Tomography disclosed detachments that were undetected by slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Longitudinal measurements with optical coherence Tomography were successfully able to track the resolution of subretinal fluid accumulation. Conclusion Optical coherence Tomography is potentially useful as a new, noninvasive diagnostic technique for quantitative examination of patients with central serous chorioretinopathy and objectively monitoring the clinical course of the serous retinal detachment in this disease.

  • Optical Coherence Tomography of the Human Retina
    Archives of ophthalmology (Chicago Ill. : 1960), 1995
    Co-Authors: Michael R Hee, Eric A Swanson, Joseph A. Izatt, David Huang, Joel S Schuman, Carmen A Puliafito, Charles P. Lin, James G Fujimoto
    Abstract:

    Objective: To demonstrate optical coherence Tomography for high-resolution, noninvasive imaging of the human retina. Optical coherence Tomography is a new imaging technique analogous to ultrasound B scan that can provide cross-sectional images of the retina with micrometer-scale resolution. Design: Survey optical coherence tomographic examination of the retina, including the macula and optic nerve head in normal human subjects. Setting: Research laboratory. Participants: Convenience sample of normal human subjects. Main Outcome Measures: Correlation of optical coherence retinal tomographs with known normal retinal anatomy. Results: Optical coherence tomographs can discriminate the cross-sectional morphologic features of the fovea and optic disc, the layered structure of the retina, and normal anatomic variations in retinal and retinal nerve fiber layer thicknesses with 10-??m depth resolution. Conclusion: Optical coherence Tomography is a potentially useful technique for high depth resolution, cross-sectional examination of the fundus.

Carmen A Puliafito – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • in vivo retinal imaging by optical coherence Tomography
    SPIE milestone series, 2001
    Co-Authors: Eric A Swanson, Joseph A. Izatt, David Huang, Joel S Schuman, Carmen A Puliafito, James G Fujimoto
    Abstract:

    We describe what are to our knowledge the first in vivo measurements of human retinal structure with optical coherence Tomography. These images represent the highest depth resolution in vivo retinal images to date. The tomographic system, image-processing techniques, and examples of high-resolution tomographs and their clinical relevance are discussed.

  • topography of diabetic macular edema with optical coherence Tomography
    Ophthalmology, 1998
    Co-Authors: Michael R Hee, Eric A Swanson, Joel S Schuman, Carmen A Puliafito, Elias Reichel, Jay S Duker, J G Coker, J R Wilkins, James G Fujimoto
    Abstract:

    Objective: This study aimed to develop a protocol to screen and monitor patients with diabetic macular thickening using optical coherence Tomography (OCT), a technique for high-resolution cross-sectional imaging of the retina. Design: A cross-sectional pilot study was conducted. Participants: A total of 182 eyes of 107 patients with diabetic retinopathy, 55 eyes from 31 patients with diabetes but no ophthalmoscopic evidence of retinopathy, and 73 eyes from 41 healthy volunteers were studied. Intervention: Six optical coherence tomograms were obtained in a radial spoke pattern centered on the fovea. Retinal thickness was computed automatically from each tomogram at a total of 600 locations throughout the macula. Macular thickness was displayed geographically as a false-color topographic map and was reported numerically as averages in each of nine regions. Main Outcome Measures: Correlation of OCT with slit-lamp biomicroscopy, fluorescein angiography, and visual acuity was measured. Results: Optical coherence Tomography was able to quantify the development and resolution of both foveal and extrafoveal macular thickening. The mean ± standard deviation foveal thickness was 174 ± 18 μ m in normal eyes, 179 ± 17 μ m in diabetic eyes without retinopathy, and 256 ± 114 μ m in eyes with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. Foveal thickness was highly correlated among left and right eyes of normal eyes (mean ± standard deviation difference of 6 ± 9 μ m). Foveal thickness measured by OCT correlated with visual acuity ( r 2 = 0.79). A single diabetic eye with no slit-lamp evidence of retinopathy showed abnormal foveal thickening on OCT. Conclusions: Optical coherence Tomography was a useful technique for quantifying macular thickness in patients with diabetic macular edema. The topographic mapping protocol provided geographic information on macular thickness that was intuitive and objective.

  • optical coherence Tomography of central serous chorioretinopathy
    American Journal of Ophthalmology, 1995
    Co-Authors: Eric A Swanson, Joel S Schuman, Carmen A Puliafito, Michael R Hee, Carlton Wong, Elias Reichel, Jay S Duker, James G Fujimoto
    Abstract:

    Purpose To assess the potential of a new imaging technique, optical coherence Tomography, for the diagnosis and monitoring of central serous chorioretinopathy. Optical coherence Tomography is a novel noninvasive, noncontact imaging modality that produces high longitudinal resolution, cross-sectional tomographs of ocular tissue. Methods Optical coherence Tomography is analogous to ultrasound, except that it uses light rather than sound to obtain higher image resolution in the retina. Cross-sectional tomographs of optical reflectivity within the retina are produced with longitudinal resolution of 10 μm. Optical coherence Tomography was used to examine 16 patients at a referral eye center whose initial examination disclosed the clinical diagnosis of central serous chorioretinopathy. The optical coherence Tomography results were correlated with slit-lamp biomicroscopy, fundus photography, and fluorescein angiography. Results The cross-sectional view produced by optical coherence Tomography was effective in objectively quantifying the amount of serous retinal detachment in the disease. Optical coherence Tomography disclosed detachments that were undetected by slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Longitudinal measurements with optical coherence Tomography were successfully able to track the resolution of subretinal fluid accumulation. Conclusion Optical coherence Tomography is potentially useful as a new, noninvasive diagnostic technique for quantitative examination of patients with central serous chorioretinopathy and objectively monitoring the clinical course of the serous retinal detachment in this disease.

Eric A Swanson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • in vivo retinal imaging by optical coherence Tomography
    SPIE milestone series, 2001
    Co-Authors: Eric A Swanson, Joseph A. Izatt, David Huang, Joel S Schuman, Carmen A Puliafito, James G Fujimoto
    Abstract:

    We describe what are to our knowledge the first in vivo measurements of human retinal structure with optical coherence Tomography. These images represent the highest depth resolution in vivo retinal images to date. The tomographic system, image-processing techniques, and examples of high-resolution tomographs and their clinical relevance are discussed.

  • topography of diabetic macular edema with optical coherence Tomography
    Ophthalmology, 1998
    Co-Authors: Michael R Hee, Eric A Swanson, Joel S Schuman, Carmen A Puliafito, Elias Reichel, Jay S Duker, J G Coker, J R Wilkins, James G Fujimoto
    Abstract:

    Objective: This study aimed to develop a protocol to screen and monitor patients with diabetic macular thickening using optical coherence Tomography (OCT), a technique for high-resolution cross-sectional imaging of the retina. Design: A cross-sectional pilot study was conducted. Participants: A total of 182 eyes of 107 patients with diabetic retinopathy, 55 eyes from 31 patients with diabetes but no ophthalmoscopic evidence of retinopathy, and 73 eyes from 41 healthy volunteers were studied. Intervention: Six optical coherence tomograms were obtained in a radial spoke pattern centered on the fovea. Retinal thickness was computed automatically from each tomogram at a total of 600 locations throughout the macula. Macular thickness was displayed geographically as a false-color topographic map and was reported numerically as averages in each of nine regions. Main Outcome Measures: Correlation of OCT with slit-lamp biomicroscopy, fluorescein angiography, and visual acuity was measured. Results: Optical coherence Tomography was able to quantify the development and resolution of both foveal and extrafoveal macular thickening. The mean ± standard deviation foveal thickness was 174 ± 18 μ m in normal eyes, 179 ± 17 μ m in diabetic eyes without retinopathy, and 256 ± 114 μ m in eyes with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. Foveal thickness was highly correlated among left and right eyes of normal eyes (mean ± standard deviation difference of 6 ± 9 μ m). Foveal thickness measured by OCT correlated with visual acuity ( r 2 = 0.79). A single diabetic eye with no slit-lamp evidence of retinopathy showed abnormal foveal thickening on OCT. Conclusions: Optical coherence Tomography was a useful technique for quantifying macular thickness in patients with diabetic macular edema. The topographic mapping protocol provided geographic information on macular thickness that was intuitive and objective.

  • optical coherence Tomography of central serous chorioretinopathy
    American Journal of Ophthalmology, 1995
    Co-Authors: Eric A Swanson, Joel S Schuman, Carmen A Puliafito, Michael R Hee, Carlton Wong, Elias Reichel, Jay S Duker, James G Fujimoto
    Abstract:

    Purpose To assess the potential of a new imaging technique, optical coherence Tomography, for the diagnosis and monitoring of central serous chorioretinopathy. Optical coherence Tomography is a novel noninvasive, noncontact imaging modality that produces high longitudinal resolution, cross-sectional tomographs of ocular tissue. Methods Optical coherence Tomography is analogous to ultrasound, except that it uses light rather than sound to obtain higher image resolution in the retina. Cross-sectional tomographs of optical reflectivity within the retina are produced with longitudinal resolution of 10 μm. Optical coherence Tomography was used to examine 16 patients at a referral eye center whose initial examination disclosed the clinical diagnosis of central serous chorioretinopathy. The optical coherence Tomography results were correlated with slit-lamp biomicroscopy, fundus photography, and fluorescein angiography. Results The cross-sectional view produced by optical coherence Tomography was effective in objectively quantifying the amount of serous retinal detachment in the disease. Optical coherence Tomography disclosed detachments that were undetected by slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Longitudinal measurements with optical coherence Tomography were successfully able to track the resolution of subretinal fluid accumulation. Conclusion Optical coherence Tomography is potentially useful as a new, noninvasive diagnostic technique for quantitative examination of patients with central serous chorioretinopathy and objectively monitoring the clinical course of the serous retinal detachment in this disease.

Joel S Schuman – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • in vivo retinal imaging by optical coherence Tomography
    SPIE milestone series, 2001
    Co-Authors: Eric A Swanson, Joseph A. Izatt, David Huang, Joel S Schuman, Carmen A Puliafito, James G Fujimoto
    Abstract:

    We describe what are to our knowledge the first in vivo measurements of human retinal structure with optical coherence Tomography. These images represent the highest depth resolution in vivo retinal images to date. The tomographic system, image-processing techniques, and examples of high-resolution tomographs and their clinical relevance are discussed.

  • topography of diabetic macular edema with optical coherence Tomography
    Ophthalmology, 1998
    Co-Authors: Michael R Hee, Eric A Swanson, Joel S Schuman, Carmen A Puliafito, Elias Reichel, Jay S Duker, J G Coker, J R Wilkins, James G Fujimoto
    Abstract:

    Objective: This study aimed to develop a protocol to screen and monitor patients with diabetic macular thickening using optical coherence Tomography (OCT), a technique for high-resolution cross-sectional imaging of the retina. Design: A cross-sectional pilot study was conducted. Participants: A total of 182 eyes of 107 patients with diabetic retinopathy, 55 eyes from 31 patients with diabetes but no ophthalmoscopic evidence of retinopathy, and 73 eyes from 41 healthy volunteers were studied. Intervention: Six optical coherence tomograms were obtained in a radial spoke pattern centered on the fovea. Retinal thickness was computed automatically from each tomogram at a total of 600 locations throughout the macula. Macular thickness was displayed geographically as a false-color topographic map and was reported numerically as averages in each of nine regions. Main Outcome Measures: Correlation of OCT with slit-lamp biomicroscopy, fluorescein angiography, and visual acuity was measured. Results: Optical coherence Tomography was able to quantify the development and resolution of both foveal and extrafoveal macular thickening. The mean ± standard deviation foveal thickness was 174 ± 18 μ m in normal eyes, 179 ± 17 μ m in diabetic eyes without retinopathy, and 256 ± 114 μ m in eyes with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. Foveal thickness was highly correlated among left and right eyes of normal eyes (mean ± standard deviation difference of 6 ± 9 μ m). Foveal thickness measured by OCT correlated with visual acuity ( r 2 = 0.79). A single diabetic eye with no slit-lamp evidence of retinopathy showed abnormal foveal thickening on OCT. Conclusions: Optical coherence Tomography was a useful technique for quantifying macular thickness in patients with diabetic macular edema. The topographic mapping protocol provided geographic information on macular thickness that was intuitive and objective.

  • optical coherence Tomography of central serous chorioretinopathy
    American Journal of Ophthalmology, 1995
    Co-Authors: Eric A Swanson, Joel S Schuman, Carmen A Puliafito, Michael R Hee, Carlton Wong, Elias Reichel, Jay S Duker, James G Fujimoto
    Abstract:

    Purpose To assess the potential of a new imaging technique, optical coherence Tomography, for the diagnosis and monitoring of central serous chorioretinopathy. Optical coherence Tomography is a novel noninvasive, noncontact imaging modality that produces high longitudinal resolution, cross-sectional tomographs of ocular tissue. Methods Optical coherence Tomography is analogous to ultrasound, except that it uses light rather than sound to obtain higher image resolution in the retina. Cross-sectional tomographs of optical reflectivity within the retina are produced with longitudinal resolution of 10 μm. Optical coherence Tomography was used to examine 16 patients at a referral eye center whose initial examination disclosed the clinical diagnosis of central serous chorioretinopathy. The optical coherence Tomography results were correlated with slit-lamp biomicroscopy, fundus photography, and fluorescein angiography. Results The cross-sectional view produced by optical coherence Tomography was effective in objectively quantifying the amount of serous retinal detachment in the disease. Optical coherence Tomography disclosed detachments that were undetected by slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Longitudinal measurements with optical coherence Tomography were successfully able to track the resolution of subretinal fluid accumulation. Conclusion Optical coherence Tomography is potentially useful as a new, noninvasive diagnostic technique for quantitative examination of patients with central serous chorioretinopathy and objectively monitoring the clinical course of the serous retinal detachment in this disease.