Transplanting

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Lianna L Jarecki - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • long term survival and colony growth of acropora palmata fragments transplanted by volunteers for restoration
    Aquatic Conservation-marine and Freshwater Ecosystems, 2014
    Co-Authors: Graham E Forrester, Megan Ferguson, Caitlin E Oconnellrodwell, Lianna L Jarecki
    Abstract:

    Many branching corals are fragmented by storms, which can serve as a mechanism of asexual reproduction for species that are able to reattach themselves to the substratum and form new colonies. Fragments can also be manually reattached as a means of reef restoration. The growth and survival of 832 fragments of Elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata, that were transplanted for a restoration project in the British Virgin Islands was modelled. Mortality was higher in the first year after Transplanting than in subsequent years, perhaps reflecting stress from handling or failure of the attachment method. Survival also varied with the year of transplantation (from 2005–2011), and was lowest in years with major storms (2007 and 2010). Fragment survival increased with increasing initial size, with the largest fragments (surface area roughly 1000 cm2) faring substantially better than the smallest (roughly 10 cm2) and average sized fragments (roughly 100 cm2). Colony size (surface area of live tissue) tended to decrease slightly in the first 3 months after being reattached, presumably due to stress from Transplanting. Subsequently, the surface area of surviving colonies tended to progressively increase over time, with fragments typically reaching 3000 cm2 after 7 years. Colony growth was, however, extremely variable and largely independent of initial colony size. Despite initial reductions in growth and survival due to Transplanting, long-term survival of transplanted fragments was roughly comparable with that of natural colonies. Transplanting fragments is thus a promising tool for grass-roots restoration projects. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Long‐term survival and colony growth of Acropora palmata fragments transplanted by volunteers for restoration
    Aquatic Conservation-marine and Freshwater Ecosystems, 2013
    Co-Authors: Graham E Forrester, Megan A. Ferguson, Caitlin E. O'connell-rodwell, Lianna L Jarecki
    Abstract:

    Many branching corals are fragmented by storms, which can serve as a mechanism of asexual reproduction for species that are able to reattach themselves to the substratum and form new colonies. Fragments can also be manually reattached as a means of reef restoration. The growth and survival of 832 fragments of Elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata, that were transplanted for a restoration project in the British Virgin Islands was modelled. Mortality was higher in the first year after Transplanting than in subsequent years, perhaps reflecting stress from handling or failure of the attachment method. Survival also varied with the year of transplantation (from 2005–2011), and was lowest in years with major storms (2007 and 2010). Fragment survival increased with increasing initial size, with the largest fragments (surface area roughly 1000 cm2) faring substantially better than the smallest (roughly 10 cm2) and average sized fragments (roughly 100 cm2). Colony size (surface area of live tissue) tended to decrease slightly in the first 3 months after being reattached, presumably due to stress from Transplanting. Subsequently, the surface area of surviving colonies tended to progressively increase over time, with fragments typically reaching 3000 cm2 after 7 years. Colony growth was, however, extremely variable and largely independent of initial colony size. Despite initial reductions in growth and survival due to Transplanting, long-term survival of transplanted fragments was roughly comparable with that of natural colonies. Transplanting fragments is thus a promising tool for grass-roots restoration projects. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Young Soo Yang - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • design of a non circular planetary gear train system to generate an optimal trajectory in a rice transplanter
    Journal of Engineering Design, 2007
    Co-Authors: Young Soo Yang
    Abstract:

    The Transplanting accuracy of a rice transplanter for picking, conveying and Transplanting seedlings mainly depends on the trajectory as well as the return motion of the hoe. The trajectory of the hoe has to be optimized in treating seedlings for a prevailing soil condition. For better Transplanting accuracy, a planetary-gear-train system, instead of the four-bar linkage system is used to design a Transplanting mechanism. This study proposes a theoretical design method for a Transplanting mechanism; the method designs non-circular gears of a planetary-gear-train system for the hoe to trace a prescribed trajectory. An optimization method was used to determine the arm length and tool length; inverse kinematics to determine the configuration angles of the two links and the roll contact condition in transmitting motion between the gears; and a linearization approach to obtain the shapes of the gears. Based on the proposed method, the shapes of the gears and the lengths of the tools of the planetary-gear-train...

Ke Xu - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Effect of Interplanting with Zero Tillage and Straw Manure on Rice Growth and Rice Quality
    Rice Science, 2007
    Co-Authors: Ke Xu
    Abstract:

    The interplanting with zero-tillage of rice, i.e. direct sowing rice 10-20 days before wheat harvesting, and remaining about 30-cm high stubble after cutting wheat or rice with no tillage, is a new cultivation technology in wheat-rice rotation system. To study the effects of interplanting with zero tillage and straw manure on rice growth and quality, an experiment was conducted in a wheat-rotation rotation system. Four treatments, i.e. ZIS (Zero-tillage, straw manure and rice interplanting), ZI (Zero-tillage, no straw manure and rice interplanting), PTS (Plowing tillage, straw manure and rice Transplanting), and PT (Plowing tillage, no straw manure and rice Transplanting), were used. ZIS reduced plant height, leaf area per plant and the biomass of rice plants, but the biomass accumulation of rice at the late stage was quicker than that under conventional Transplanting cultivation. In the first year (2002), there was no significant difference in rice yield among the four treatments. However, rice yield decreased in interplanting with zero-tillage in the second year (2003). Compared with the Transplanting treatments, the number of filled grains per panicle decreased but 1000-grain weight increased in interplanting with zero-tillage, which were the main factors resulting in higher yield. Interplanting with zero-tillage improved the milling and appearance qualities of rice. The rates of milled and head rice increased while chalky rice rate and chalkiness decreased in interplanting with zero-tillage. Zero-tillage and interplanting also affected rice nutritional and cooking qualities. In 2002, ZIS showed raised protein content, decreased amylose content, softer gel consistency, resulting in improved rice quality. In 2003, zero-tillage and interplanting decreased protein content and showed similar amylose content as compared with Transplanting treatments. Moreover, protein content in PTS was obviously increased in comparison with the other three treatments. The rice in interplanting with zero-tillage treatments had higher peak viscosity and breakdown, lower setback, showing better rice taste quality. The straw manure had no significant effect on rice viscosity under interplanting with zero-tillage, but had the negative influence on the rice taste quality under Transplanting with plowing tillage.

Graham E Forrester - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • long term survival and colony growth of acropora palmata fragments transplanted by volunteers for restoration
    Aquatic Conservation-marine and Freshwater Ecosystems, 2014
    Co-Authors: Graham E Forrester, Megan Ferguson, Caitlin E Oconnellrodwell, Lianna L Jarecki
    Abstract:

    Many branching corals are fragmented by storms, which can serve as a mechanism of asexual reproduction for species that are able to reattach themselves to the substratum and form new colonies. Fragments can also be manually reattached as a means of reef restoration. The growth and survival of 832 fragments of Elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata, that were transplanted for a restoration project in the British Virgin Islands was modelled. Mortality was higher in the first year after Transplanting than in subsequent years, perhaps reflecting stress from handling or failure of the attachment method. Survival also varied with the year of transplantation (from 2005–2011), and was lowest in years with major storms (2007 and 2010). Fragment survival increased with increasing initial size, with the largest fragments (surface area roughly 1000 cm2) faring substantially better than the smallest (roughly 10 cm2) and average sized fragments (roughly 100 cm2). Colony size (surface area of live tissue) tended to decrease slightly in the first 3 months after being reattached, presumably due to stress from Transplanting. Subsequently, the surface area of surviving colonies tended to progressively increase over time, with fragments typically reaching 3000 cm2 after 7 years. Colony growth was, however, extremely variable and largely independent of initial colony size. Despite initial reductions in growth and survival due to Transplanting, long-term survival of transplanted fragments was roughly comparable with that of natural colonies. Transplanting fragments is thus a promising tool for grass-roots restoration projects. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Long‐term survival and colony growth of Acropora palmata fragments transplanted by volunteers for restoration
    Aquatic Conservation-marine and Freshwater Ecosystems, 2013
    Co-Authors: Graham E Forrester, Megan A. Ferguson, Caitlin E. O'connell-rodwell, Lianna L Jarecki
    Abstract:

    Many branching corals are fragmented by storms, which can serve as a mechanism of asexual reproduction for species that are able to reattach themselves to the substratum and form new colonies. Fragments can also be manually reattached as a means of reef restoration. The growth and survival of 832 fragments of Elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata, that were transplanted for a restoration project in the British Virgin Islands was modelled. Mortality was higher in the first year after Transplanting than in subsequent years, perhaps reflecting stress from handling or failure of the attachment method. Survival also varied with the year of transplantation (from 2005–2011), and was lowest in years with major storms (2007 and 2010). Fragment survival increased with increasing initial size, with the largest fragments (surface area roughly 1000 cm2) faring substantially better than the smallest (roughly 10 cm2) and average sized fragments (roughly 100 cm2). Colony size (surface area of live tissue) tended to decrease slightly in the first 3 months after being reattached, presumably due to stress from Transplanting. Subsequently, the surface area of surviving colonies tended to progressively increase over time, with fragments typically reaching 3000 cm2 after 7 years. Colony growth was, however, extremely variable and largely independent of initial colony size. Despite initial reductions in growth and survival due to Transplanting, long-term survival of transplanted fragments was roughly comparable with that of natural colonies. Transplanting fragments is thus a promising tool for grass-roots restoration projects. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

M A Rahman - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • minimum tillage unpuddled Transplanting an alternative crop establishment strategy for rice in conservation agriculture cropping systems
    Field Crops Research, 2016
    Co-Authors: M E Haque, R W Bell, M A Islam, M A Rahman
    Abstract:

    Adoption of conservation agriculture (CA) has been hampered in puddled rice-based cropping systems. In this study, we developed a method for Transplanting rice (Oryza sativa L.) with minimal soil disturbance (referred to as minimum tillage unpuddled Transplanting) that can expand the range of situations where CA could be practiced in rice-based cropping systems. A field experiment was conducted over three years at two sites with unpuddled and puddled rice comparisons in each monsoon season. In addition, transplanted rice was grown in three seasons on unpuddled or fully puddled soils in a total of 27 farmers' plots in north-west Bangladesh. In each year and season, minimum tillage unpuddled conditions were established by strip tillage and compared with single pass shallow tillage or bed formation, and with the conventional soil puddling and Transplanting. Unpuddled Transplanting by any of the three single-pass soil disturbance operations had no negative effect on rice yields across seasons and years. The minimum soil disturbance in strip tillage did not impede Transplanting of rice or increase the labor costs of Transplanting compared to puddled Transplanting except in the farmers' plot of the first season. All single-pass and minimum soil disturbance tillage operations reduced cost of production, and increased the gross margin of rice relative to conventional puddling and Transplanting. Minimum tillage unpuddled Transplanting reduced the time taken for land preparation and crop establishment and decreased the number of irrigation events required to saturate the soil. Minimum tillage unpuddled Transplanting appears to be a feasible approach for establishment of wetland rice in CA systems.