Turbine - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Turbine

The Experts below are selected from a list of 565338 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Turbine – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

F. Spinato – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Reliability of wind Turbine subassemblies
    IET Renewable Power Generation, 2009
    Co-Authors: F. Spinato, Peter J. Tavner, G.j.w. Van Bussel, E. Koutoulakos
    Abstract:

    We have investigated the reliability of more than 6000 modern onshore wind Turbines and their subassemblies in Denmark and Germany over 11 years and particularly changes in reliability of generators, gearboxes and converters in a subset of 650 Turbines in Schleswig Holstein, Germany. We first start by considering the average failure rate of Turbine populations and then the average failure rates of wind Turbine subassemblies. This analysis yields some surprising results about which subassemblies are the most unreliable. Then we proceed to consider the failure intensity function variation with time for wind Turbines in one of these populations, using the Power Law Process, of three subassemblies; generator, gearbox and converter. This analysis shows that wind Turbine gearboxes seem to be achieving reliabilities similar to gearboxes outside the wind industry. However, wind Turbine generators and converters are both achieving reliabilities considerably below that of other industries but the reliability of these subassemblies improves with time. The paper also considers different wind Turbine concepts. Then we conclude by proposing that offshore wind Turbines should be subject to more rigorous reliability improvement measures, such as more thorough subassembly testing, to eliminate early failures. The early focus should be on converters and generators.

  • reliability analysis for wind Turbines
    Wind Energy, 2007
    Co-Authors: Peter J. Tavner, J. Xiang, F. Spinato
    Abstract:

    Modern wind Turbines are complex aerodynamic, mechanical and electrical machines incorporating sophisticated control systems. Wind Turbines have been erected in increasing numbers in Europe, the USA and elsewhere. In Europe, Germany and Denmark have played a particularly prominent part in developing the technology, and both countries have installed large numbers of Turbines. This article is concerned with understanding the historic reliability of modern wind Turbines. The prime objective of the work is to extract information from existing data so that the reliability of large wind Turbines can be predicted, particularly when installed offshore in the future. The article uses data collected from the Windstats survey to analyse the reliability of wind Turbine components from historic German and Danish data. Windstats data have characteristics common to practical reliability surveys; for example, the number of failures is collected for each interval but the number of Turbines varies in each interval. In this article, the authors use reliability analysis methods which are not only applicable to wind Turbines but relate to any repairable system. Particular care is taken to compare results from the two populations to consider the validity of the data. The main purpose of the article is to discuss the practical methods of predicting large-wind-Turbine reliability using grouped survey data from Windstats and to show how Turbine design, Turbine configuration, time, weather and possibly maintenance can affect the extracted results. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley &Sons, Ltd.

Per-Åge Krogstad – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • experimental investigation of wake effects on wind Turbine performance
    Renewable Energy, 2011
    Co-Authors: Muyiwa S Adaramola, Per-Åge Krogstad
    Abstract:

    The wake interference effect on the performance of a downstream wind Turbine was investigated experimentally. Two similar model Turbines with the same rotor diameter were used. The effects on the performance of the downstream Turbine of the distance of separation between the Turbines and the amount of power extracted from the upstream Turbine were studied. The effects of these parameters on the total power output from the Turbines were also estimated. The reduction in the maximum power coefficient of the downstream Turbine is strongly dependent on the distance between the Turbines and the operating condition of the upstream Turbine. Depending on the distance of separation and blade pitch angle, the loss in power from the downstream Turbine varies from about 20 to 46% compared to the power output from an unobstructed single Turbine operating at its designed conditions. By operating the upstream Turbine slightly outside this optimum setting or yawing the upstream Turbine, the power output from the downstream Turbine was significantly improved. This study shows that the total power output could be increased by installing an upstream Turbine which extracts less power than the following Turbines. By operating the upstream Turbine in yawed condition, the gain in total power output from the two Turbines could be increased by about 12%.

  • Experimental investigation of wake effects on wind Turbine performance
    Renewable Energy, 2011
    Co-Authors: Muyiwa S Adaramola, Per-Åge Krogstad
    Abstract:

    The wake interference effect on the performance of a downstream wind Turbine was investigated experimentally. Two similar model Turbines with the same rotor diameter were used. The effects on the performance of the downstream Turbine of the distance of separation between the Turbines and the amount of power extracted from the upstream Turbine were studied. The effects of these parameters on the total power output from the Turbines were also estimated. The reduction in the maximum power coefficient of the downstream Turbine is strongly dependent on the distance between the Turbines and the operating condition of the upstream Turbine. Depending on the distance of separation and blade pitch angle, the loss in power from the downstream Turbine varies from about 20 to 46% compared to the power output from an unobstructed single Turbine operating at its designed conditions. By operating the upstream Turbine slightly outside this optimum setting or yawing the upstream Turbine, the power output from the downstream Turbine was significantly improved. This study shows that the total power output could be increased by installing an upstream Turbine which extracts less power than the following Turbines. By operating the upstream Turbine in yawed condition, the gain in total power output from the two Turbines could be increased by about 12%. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

Yurii Govoruschenko – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • study on applicability of radial outflow Turbine type for 3 mw whr organic rankine cycle
    Energy Procedia, 2017
    Co-Authors: Dmytro Maksiuta, Leonid Moroz, Maksym Burlaka, Yurii Govoruschenko
    Abstract:

    Abstract The article presents the results of study on the reasonability of using radial-outflow Turbines in ORC. Peculiarities of radial-outflow Turbine design utilizing modern design technologies and application to ORC was considered in the first part of the paper. The second part of the paper describes the selection process of the best Turbine type for a 3 MW WHR ORC power unit for an internal combustion engine. The selection was performed among different Turbine types, like radial-inflow, axial and radial-outflow Turbines which were designed with given boundary conditions. The advantages and disadvantages of their application were shown. Eventually, the recommendations regarding application of different Turbine types for a 3 MW WHR Organic Rankine Cycle were given. For this particular cycle design, Turbines of radial-outflow type were chosen. Their application enables the increase of mechanical output power by 11 % compared to original radial-inflow Turbines.