Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

14,000,000 Leading Edge Experts on the ideXlab platform

14,000,000

Leading Edge Experts

on the ideXlab platform

Victimization Rate

The Experts below are selected from a list of 2193 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Victimization Rate - Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Jackson Toby - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Trends in Victimization in schools and elsewhere, 1974–1981
    Journal of Quantitative Criminology, 1991
    Co-Authors: Robert Nash Parker, William R. Smith, D. Randall Smith, Jackson Toby
    Abstract:

    Trends in the Rate of Victimizations of juveniles in three settings-schools, homes, and streets/parks-are examined monthly during the period 1974–1981. The relationship between in-school Victimization Rates and those occurring outside of school are analyzed with multivariate ARMA models informed by previous research on school Victimization (Gottfredson and Gottfredson, 1985) and an importation perspective on the source of crime and Victimization in institutions such as schools. Results indicate that the overall in-school Victimization Rate remained relatively stable during this period but that Victimization Rates of juveniles in other settings had significant effects on in-school Victimizations. This suggests that underlying causes of Victimization in general are important determinants of Victimization in schools. These results are limited, however, as we examine these sources of Victimization only indirectly via relationships among the different Victimization Rates in dynamic models and by the aggregate nature of the monthly data from the National Crime Survey.

  • Trends in Victimization in schools and elsewhere, 1974-1981
    Journal of Quantitative Criminology, 1991
    Co-Authors: Robert Nash Parker, William R. Smith, D. Randall Smith, Jackson Toby
    Abstract:

    Trends in the Rate of Victimizations of juveniles in three settings-schools, homes, and streets/parks-are examined monthly during the period 1974–1981. The relationship between in-school Victimization Rates and those occurring outside of school are analyzed with multivariate ARMA models informed by previous research on school Victimization (Gottfredson and Gottfredson, 1985) and an importation perspective on the source of crime and Victimization in institutions such as schools. Results indicate that the overall in-school Victimization Rate remained relatively stable during this period but that Victimization Rates of juveniles in other settings had significant effects on in-school Victimizations. This suggests that underlying causes of Victimization in general are important determinants of Victimization in schools. These results are limited, however, as we examine these sources of Victimization only indirectly via relationships among the different Victimization Rates in dynamic models and by the aggregate nature of the monthly data from the National Crime Survey.

  • Trends in Victimization in Schools and Elsewhere
    1991
    Co-Authors: Robert Nash Parker, William R. Smith, D. Randall Smith, Jackson Toby
    Abstract:

    Trends in the Rate of Victimizations of juveniles in three settings—schools, homes, and streets/parks—are examined monthly during the period 1974-1981. The relationship between in-school Victimization Rates and those occurring outside of school are analyzed with multivariate ARMA models informed by previous research on school Victimization (Gottfredson and Gottfredson, 1985) and an importation perspective on the source of crime and Victimization in institutions such as schools. Results indicate that the overall in-school Victimization Rate remained relatively stable during this period but that Victimization Rates of juveniles in other settings had significant effects on in-school Victimizations. This suggests that underlying causes of Victimization in general are important deter minants of Victimization in schools. These results are limited, however, as we examine these sources of Victimization only indirectly via relationships among the different Victimization Rates in dynamic models and by the aggregate nature of the monthly data from the National Crime Survey.

Luke Banbury - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Rates of criminal Victimization in an early intervention for psychosis service a cross sectional survey
    Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 2018
    Co-Authors: Rowena Jones, Luke Banbury
    Abstract:

    Background There is a growing body of research looking into the high Rates of Victimization amongst people with severe mental illness. Studies to date have tended to look at Victimization Rates in people with chronic mental illness over a wide age range. However, national crime surveys indicate that younger people are more likely to be the victim of crime than older people. There is also evidence that people from ethnic minorities are more likely to experience and less likely to report criminal Victimization. This study therefore aimed to look at Victimization Rates specifically in young people with first episode psychosis (FEP) in Birmingham, one of the most youthful and ethnically diverse cities in the UK. Methods Patients with FEP under the South Birmingham Early Intervention Service were asked to complete a modified version of the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW). Data was compared to control-group data from the CSEW 2014. Results Patients with FEP were significantly more likely to be victims of crime, in particular violent crime, than their age-matched counterparts. The overall Victimization Rate was 39%. Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) groups were more likely to be victims of personal and violent crime than the white FEP population. Victimization Rates were broadly in keeping with other UK and international studies. Conclusions Young people with FEP, particularly those from BME backgrounds, are at significantly greater risk of victimhood than the general population of the West Midlands.

  • Rates of criminal Victimization in an early intervention for psychosis service ‐ a cross sectional survey
    Early intervention in psychiatry, 2017
    Co-Authors: Rowena Jones, Luke Banbury
    Abstract:

    Background There is a growing body of research looking into the high Rates of Victimization amongst people with severe mental illness. Studies to date have tended to look at Victimization Rates in people with chronic mental illness over a wide age range. However, national crime surveys indicate that younger people are more likely to be the victim of crime than older people. There is also evidence that people from ethnic minorities are more likely to experience and less likely to report criminal Victimization. This study therefore aimed to look at Victimization Rates specifically in young people with first episode psychosis (FEP) in Birmingham, one of the most youthful and ethnically diverse cities in the UK. Methods Patients with FEP under the South Birmingham Early Intervention Service were asked to complete a modified version of the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW). Data was compared to control-group data from the CSEW 2014. Results Patients with FEP were significantly more likely to be victims of crime, in particular violent crime, than their age-matched counterparts. The overall Victimization Rate was 39%. Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) groups were more likely to be victims of personal and violent crime than the white FEP population. Victimization Rates were broadly in keeping with other UK and international studies. Conclusions Young people with FEP, particularly those from BME backgrounds, are at significantly greater risk of victimhood than the general population of the West Midlands.

Robert Nash Parker - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Trends in Victimization in schools and elsewhere, 1974–1981
    Journal of Quantitative Criminology, 1991
    Co-Authors: Robert Nash Parker, William R. Smith, D. Randall Smith, Jackson Toby
    Abstract:

    Trends in the Rate of Victimizations of juveniles in three settings-schools, homes, and streets/parks-are examined monthly during the period 1974–1981. The relationship between in-school Victimization Rates and those occurring outside of school are analyzed with multivariate ARMA models informed by previous research on school Victimization (Gottfredson and Gottfredson, 1985) and an importation perspective on the source of crime and Victimization in institutions such as schools. Results indicate that the overall in-school Victimization Rate remained relatively stable during this period but that Victimization Rates of juveniles in other settings had significant effects on in-school Victimizations. This suggests that underlying causes of Victimization in general are important determinants of Victimization in schools. These results are limited, however, as we examine these sources of Victimization only indirectly via relationships among the different Victimization Rates in dynamic models and by the aggregate nature of the monthly data from the National Crime Survey.

  • Trends in Victimization in schools and elsewhere, 1974-1981
    Journal of Quantitative Criminology, 1991
    Co-Authors: Robert Nash Parker, William R. Smith, D. Randall Smith, Jackson Toby
    Abstract:

    Trends in the Rate of Victimizations of juveniles in three settings-schools, homes, and streets/parks-are examined monthly during the period 1974–1981. The relationship between in-school Victimization Rates and those occurring outside of school are analyzed with multivariate ARMA models informed by previous research on school Victimization (Gottfredson and Gottfredson, 1985) and an importation perspective on the source of crime and Victimization in institutions such as schools. Results indicate that the overall in-school Victimization Rate remained relatively stable during this period but that Victimization Rates of juveniles in other settings had significant effects on in-school Victimizations. This suggests that underlying causes of Victimization in general are important determinants of Victimization in schools. These results are limited, however, as we examine these sources of Victimization only indirectly via relationships among the different Victimization Rates in dynamic models and by the aggregate nature of the monthly data from the National Crime Survey.

  • Trends in Victimization in Schools and Elsewhere
    1991
    Co-Authors: Robert Nash Parker, William R. Smith, D. Randall Smith, Jackson Toby
    Abstract:

    Trends in the Rate of Victimizations of juveniles in three settings—schools, homes, and streets/parks—are examined monthly during the period 1974-1981. The relationship between in-school Victimization Rates and those occurring outside of school are analyzed with multivariate ARMA models informed by previous research on school Victimization (Gottfredson and Gottfredson, 1985) and an importation perspective on the source of crime and Victimization in institutions such as schools. Results indicate that the overall in-school Victimization Rate remained relatively stable during this period but that Victimization Rates of juveniles in other settings had significant effects on in-school Victimizations. This suggests that underlying causes of Victimization in general are important deter minants of Victimization in schools. These results are limited, however, as we examine these sources of Victimization only indirectly via relationships among the different Victimization Rates in dynamic models and by the aggregate nature of the monthly data from the National Crime Survey.

Rowena Jones - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Rates of criminal Victimization in an early intervention for psychosis service a cross sectional survey
    Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 2018
    Co-Authors: Rowena Jones, Luke Banbury
    Abstract:

    Background There is a growing body of research looking into the high Rates of Victimization amongst people with severe mental illness. Studies to date have tended to look at Victimization Rates in people with chronic mental illness over a wide age range. However, national crime surveys indicate that younger people are more likely to be the victim of crime than older people. There is also evidence that people from ethnic minorities are more likely to experience and less likely to report criminal Victimization. This study therefore aimed to look at Victimization Rates specifically in young people with first episode psychosis (FEP) in Birmingham, one of the most youthful and ethnically diverse cities in the UK. Methods Patients with FEP under the South Birmingham Early Intervention Service were asked to complete a modified version of the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW). Data was compared to control-group data from the CSEW 2014. Results Patients with FEP were significantly more likely to be victims of crime, in particular violent crime, than their age-matched counterparts. The overall Victimization Rate was 39%. Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) groups were more likely to be victims of personal and violent crime than the white FEP population. Victimization Rates were broadly in keeping with other UK and international studies. Conclusions Young people with FEP, particularly those from BME backgrounds, are at significantly greater risk of victimhood than the general population of the West Midlands.

  • Rates of criminal Victimization in an early intervention for psychosis service ‐ a cross sectional survey
    Early intervention in psychiatry, 2017
    Co-Authors: Rowena Jones, Luke Banbury
    Abstract:

    Background There is a growing body of research looking into the high Rates of Victimization amongst people with severe mental illness. Studies to date have tended to look at Victimization Rates in people with chronic mental illness over a wide age range. However, national crime surveys indicate that younger people are more likely to be the victim of crime than older people. There is also evidence that people from ethnic minorities are more likely to experience and less likely to report criminal Victimization. This study therefore aimed to look at Victimization Rates specifically in young people with first episode psychosis (FEP) in Birmingham, one of the most youthful and ethnically diverse cities in the UK. Methods Patients with FEP under the South Birmingham Early Intervention Service were asked to complete a modified version of the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW). Data was compared to control-group data from the CSEW 2014. Results Patients with FEP were significantly more likely to be victims of crime, in particular violent crime, than their age-matched counterparts. The overall Victimization Rate was 39%. Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) groups were more likely to be victims of personal and violent crime than the white FEP population. Victimization Rates were broadly in keeping with other UK and international studies. Conclusions Young people with FEP, particularly those from BME backgrounds, are at significantly greater risk of victimhood than the general population of the West Midlands.

William R. Smith - One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Trends in Victimization in schools and elsewhere, 1974–1981
    Journal of Quantitative Criminology, 1991
    Co-Authors: Robert Nash Parker, William R. Smith, D. Randall Smith, Jackson Toby
    Abstract:

    Trends in the Rate of Victimizations of juveniles in three settings-schools, homes, and streets/parks-are examined monthly during the period 1974–1981. The relationship between in-school Victimization Rates and those occurring outside of school are analyzed with multivariate ARMA models informed by previous research on school Victimization (Gottfredson and Gottfredson, 1985) and an importation perspective on the source of crime and Victimization in institutions such as schools. Results indicate that the overall in-school Victimization Rate remained relatively stable during this period but that Victimization Rates of juveniles in other settings had significant effects on in-school Victimizations. This suggests that underlying causes of Victimization in general are important determinants of Victimization in schools. These results are limited, however, as we examine these sources of Victimization only indirectly via relationships among the different Victimization Rates in dynamic models and by the aggregate nature of the monthly data from the National Crime Survey.

  • Trends in Victimization in schools and elsewhere, 1974-1981
    Journal of Quantitative Criminology, 1991
    Co-Authors: Robert Nash Parker, William R. Smith, D. Randall Smith, Jackson Toby
    Abstract:

    Trends in the Rate of Victimizations of juveniles in three settings-schools, homes, and streets/parks-are examined monthly during the period 1974–1981. The relationship between in-school Victimization Rates and those occurring outside of school are analyzed with multivariate ARMA models informed by previous research on school Victimization (Gottfredson and Gottfredson, 1985) and an importation perspective on the source of crime and Victimization in institutions such as schools. Results indicate that the overall in-school Victimization Rate remained relatively stable during this period but that Victimization Rates of juveniles in other settings had significant effects on in-school Victimizations. This suggests that underlying causes of Victimization in general are important determinants of Victimization in schools. These results are limited, however, as we examine these sources of Victimization only indirectly via relationships among the different Victimization Rates in dynamic models and by the aggregate nature of the monthly data from the National Crime Survey.

  • Trends in Victimization in Schools and Elsewhere
    1991
    Co-Authors: Robert Nash Parker, William R. Smith, D. Randall Smith, Jackson Toby
    Abstract:

    Trends in the Rate of Victimizations of juveniles in three settings—schools, homes, and streets/parks—are examined monthly during the period 1974-1981. The relationship between in-school Victimization Rates and those occurring outside of school are analyzed with multivariate ARMA models informed by previous research on school Victimization (Gottfredson and Gottfredson, 1985) and an importation perspective on the source of crime and Victimization in institutions such as schools. Results indicate that the overall in-school Victimization Rate remained relatively stable during this period but that Victimization Rates of juveniles in other settings had significant effects on in-school Victimizations. This suggests that underlying causes of Victimization in general are important deter minants of Victimization in schools. These results are limited, however, as we examine these sources of Victimization only indirectly via relationships among the different Victimization Rates in dynamic models and by the aggregate nature of the monthly data from the National Crime Survey.