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4-Ethylphenol

The Experts below are selected from a list of 327 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

D. Chassagne – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Influence of the drying processes of yeasts on their volatile phenol sorption capacity in model wine.
    International Journal of Food Microbiology, 2009
    Co-Authors: R. Pradelles, Susanna Vichi, H. Alexandre, D. Chassagne

    Abstract:

    Volatile phenols, such as 4-Ethylphenol, are responsible for a “horsey” smell in wine. Thus, the study of volatile phenol sorption in yeasts, and their subsequent elimination from wine, helps to optimize eco-friendly wine curative processes. Here, we compared the influences of spray drying, lyophilization and evaporative drying at low water activity on yeast, for improving the 4-Ethylphenol sorption capacity in a synthetic model wine. The changes that occur in the physico-chemical characteristics of the yeast surface (surface hydrophobicity, electron-donor character and zeta potential) during these drying processes were determined to assess if any correlation exists between these factors and the 4-Ethylphenol sorption capacities of the cells. Evaporative drying at low water activity, spray drying and lyophilization induced, respectively, 61.5%, 169% and 192% greater 4-Ethylphenol sorption than biomass without drying treatment. Surface hydrophobicity of yeasts was also significantly greater, but the zeta potential of yeast cells was significantly lower after the drying processes. This is the first report investigating changes to the physico-chemical variables affected during yeast drying. These cell surface modifications were correlated with the 4-ethyphenol sorption value measured.

  • Influence of the drying processes of yeasts on their volatile phenol sorption capacity in model wine
    International Journal of Food Microbiology, 2009
    Co-Authors: R. Pradelles, Susanna Vichi, H. Alexandre, D. Chassagne

    Abstract:

    Volatile phenols, such as 4-Ethylphenol, are responsible for a “horsey” smell in wine. Thus, the study of volatile phenol sorption in yeasts, and their subsequent elimination from wine, helps to optimize eco-friendly wine curative processes. Here, we compared the influences of spray drying, lyophilization and evaporative drying at low water activity on yeast, for improving the 4-Ethylphenol sorption capacity in a synthetic model wine. The changes that occur in the physico-chemical characteristics of the yeast surface (surface hydrophobicity, electron-donor character and zeta potential) during these drying processes were determined to assess if any correlation exists between these factors and the 4-Ethylphenol sorption capacities of the cells. Evaporative drying at low water activity, spray drying and lyophilization induced, respectively, 61.5%, 169% and 192% greater 4-Ethylphenol sorption than biomass without drying treatment. Surface hydrophobicity of yeasts was also significantly greater, but the zeta potential of yeast cells was significantly lower after the drying processes. This is the first report investigating changes to the physico-chemical variables affected during yeast drying. These cell surface modifications were correlated with the 4-ethyphenol sorption value measured. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • Effects of yeast cell-wall characteristics on 4-Ethylphenol sorption capacity in model wine.
    Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 2008
    Co-Authors: R. Pradelles, Hervé Alexandre, Anne Ortiz-julien, D. Chassagne

    Abstract:

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an efficient biosorbant, used in winemaking to reduce the concentration of undesirable molecules such as fatty acids. Volatile phenols such as 4-Ethylphenol, which causes a horsy smell in wine, are particular targets of this type of curative process. This study demonstrates that the sorption capacity of 4-Ethylphenol by yeasts is greatly influenced by strain nature, methods, and medium used for biomass production and drying after harvesting. S. cerevisiae mutant strains with deletion of genes encoding specific proteins involved in cell-wall structure and composition were studied, and a major role for mannoproteins in 4-Ethylphenol sorption was identified. It was confirmed that 4-Ethylphenol sorption occurs at the surface of the yeast wall and that not all mannoproteins are determinants of sorption: the sorption capacity of cells with deletion of the Gas1p-encoding gene was 75% lower than that of wild type. Physicochemical properties of yeast cell surface have been also studied.

Eduardo Dellacassa – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • determination of volatile phenols in red wines by dispersive liquid liquid microextraction and gas chromatography mass spectrometry detection
    Journal of Chromatography A, 2007
    Co-Authors: Laura Farina, Eduardo Boido, Francisco Carrau, Eduardo Dellacassa

    Abstract:

    Abstract A new method was developed for analysing 4-ethylguaiacol and 4-Ethylphenol in the aroma of red wines using dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry detection (GC–MS). Parameters such as extraction solvent, sample volume and disperser solvent were studied and optimised to obtain the best extraction results with the minimum interference from other substances, thus giving clean chromatograms. The response linearity was studied in the usual concentration ranges of analytes in wines (50–1500 μg/L). Repeatability and reproducibility of this method were lower than 5% for both volatile phenols. Limits of detection and limits of quantification were also determined, and the values found were 28 and 95 μg/L for 4-ethylguaiacol and 44 and 147 μg/L for 4-Ethylphenol, respectively. This new method has been used for the determination of the volatile phenols concentration in different samples of Tannat wine affected by Brettanomyces contamination.

R. Pradelles – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Influence of the drying processes of yeasts on their volatile phenol sorption capacity in model wine.
    International Journal of Food Microbiology, 2009
    Co-Authors: R. Pradelles, Susanna Vichi, H. Alexandre, D. Chassagne

    Abstract:

    Volatile phenols, such as 4-Ethylphenol, are responsible for a “horsey” smell in wine. Thus, the study of volatile phenol sorption in yeasts, and their subsequent elimination from wine, helps to optimize eco-friendly wine curative processes. Here, we compared the influences of spray drying, lyophilization and evaporative drying at low water activity on yeast, for improving the 4-Ethylphenol sorption capacity in a synthetic model wine. The changes that occur in the physico-chemical characteristics of the yeast surface (surface hydrophobicity, electron-donor character and zeta potential) during these drying processes were determined to assess if any correlation exists between these factors and the 4-Ethylphenol sorption capacities of the cells. Evaporative drying at low water activity, spray drying and lyophilization induced, respectively, 61.5%, 169% and 192% greater 4-Ethylphenol sorption than biomass without drying treatment. Surface hydrophobicity of yeasts was also significantly greater, but the zeta potential of yeast cells was significantly lower after the drying processes. This is the first report investigating changes to the physico-chemical variables affected during yeast drying. These cell surface modifications were correlated with the 4-ethyphenol sorption value measured.

  • Influence of the drying processes of yeasts on their volatile phenol sorption capacity in model wine
    International Journal of Food Microbiology, 2009
    Co-Authors: R. Pradelles, Susanna Vichi, H. Alexandre, D. Chassagne

    Abstract:

    Volatile phenols, such as 4-Ethylphenol, are responsible for a “horsey” smell in wine. Thus, the study of volatile phenol sorption in yeasts, and their subsequent elimination from wine, helps to optimize eco-friendly wine curative processes. Here, we compared the influences of spray drying, lyophilization and evaporative drying at low water activity on yeast, for improving the 4-Ethylphenol sorption capacity in a synthetic model wine. The changes that occur in the physico-chemical characteristics of the yeast surface (surface hydrophobicity, electron-donor character and zeta potential) during these drying processes were determined to assess if any correlation exists between these factors and the 4-Ethylphenol sorption capacities of the cells. Evaporative drying at low water activity, spray drying and lyophilization induced, respectively, 61.5%, 169% and 192% greater 4-Ethylphenol sorption than biomass without drying treatment. Surface hydrophobicity of yeasts was also significantly greater, but the zeta potential of yeast cells was significantly lower after the drying processes. This is the first report investigating changes to the physico-chemical variables affected during yeast drying. These cell surface modifications were correlated with the 4-ethyphenol sorption value measured. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • Effects of yeast cell-wall characteristics on 4-Ethylphenol sorption capacity in model wine.
    Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 2008
    Co-Authors: R. Pradelles, Hervé Alexandre, Anne Ortiz-julien, D. Chassagne

    Abstract:

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an efficient biosorbant, used in winemaking to reduce the concentration of undesirable molecules such as fatty acids. Volatile phenols such as 4-Ethylphenol, which causes a horsy smell in wine, are particular targets of this type of curative process. This study demonstrates that the sorption capacity of 4-Ethylphenol by yeasts is greatly influenced by strain nature, methods, and medium used for biomass production and drying after harvesting. S. cerevisiae mutant strains with deletion of genes encoding specific proteins involved in cell-wall structure and composition were studied, and a major role for mannoproteins in 4-Ethylphenol sorption was identified. It was confirmed that 4-Ethylphenol sorption occurs at the surface of the yeast wall and that not all mannoproteins are determinants of sorption: the sorption capacity of cells with deletion of the Gas1p-encoding gene was 75% lower than that of wild type. Physicochemical properties of yeast cell surface have been also studied.