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Peter Wobrauschek – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Atomic Spectrometry updata-X-ray fluorescence Spectrometry
    Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry, 2011
    Co-Authors: Margaret West, Andrew T Ellis, Philip J. Potts, Christina Streli, Christine Vanhoof, Dariusz Wegrzynek, Peter Wobrauschek
    Abstract:

    This review covers developments over the period 2010–2011 in XRF instrumentation and detectors, matrix correction and spectrum analysis procedures, X-ray optics and micro-fluorescence, synchrotron XRF, TXRF, portable XRF and on-line systems plus associated applications.

  • Atomic Spectrometry update. X-ray fluorescence Spectrometry
    Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry, 2001
    Co-Authors: Philip J. Potts, Margaret West, Andrew T Ellis, Christina Streli, Christine Vanhoof, Peter Kregsamer, John Marshall, Peter Wobrauschek
    Abstract:

    This annual review of X-ray fluorescence covers developments over the period 2000 2001 in instrumentation and detectors, matrix correction and spectrum analysis software, X-ray optics and microfluorescence, synchrotron XRF, TXRF, portable XRF and on-line applications as assessed from the published literature. The review also covers a survey of applications, including sample preparation, geological, environmental, archaeological, forensic, biological, clinical, thin films, chemical state and speciation studies. During the current review period, publications have demonstrated the development of sub-100 nm X-ray beams for SR microprobe analysis together with the wider use of WD spectrometers in this application. There is evidence of an extension of the application of XRF as a reference technique, with XRF increasingly being used in modern laboratories in place of older wet-chemical methods, and computer-modelling studies continue to be popular in extending the understanding of various XRF phenomena. Some interesting work has been undertaken in the measurement of radiative Auger effects using high-resolution WDXRF instruments. However, the potential for future developments in XRF is illustrated by research into ultra-high resolution microcalorimeter detector devices, which are still at the experimental stage and have not yet progressed to the status of useful practical devices.

  • Atomic Spectrometry update. X-ray fluorescence Spectrometry
    Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry, 1998
    Co-Authors: Andrew T Ellis, Margaret West, Philip J. Potts, Christina Streli, Peter Kregsamer, Michael Holmes, Peter Wobrauschek
    Abstract:

    The current work continues the annual series of reviews of progress in X-ray fluorescence Spectrometry and covers work published during 1997–98. The papers referred to in this review are the ones that in the judgement of the authors made a significant contribution to the advancement of XRF. The style and scope are very similar to earlier reviews in the series (for example, ref. 1), with a comprehensive coverage of all aspects of XRF. There continue to be important developments in the field, notable amongst which are the very high resolution energy dispersive detector devices, specifically microcalorimeter and superconducting tunnel junction devices. Indeed, there is continuing interest in developments in a wide range of solid state detector devices, although mercury(II) iodide is the only detector material yet to challenge Si(Li) or HPGe in some applications. Interest in matrix correction procedures continues to be buoyant, although this year has seen a temporary hiatus in fundamental parameter publications. Laboratory microfluorescence has become well established, not the least because of the availability of commercial instrumentation, some of which incorporates glass capillary optics. Investment in synchrotron radiation facilities continues to be strong, ensuring a continuing stream of research publications. One of the significant trends over the last year has been the large number of TXRF contributions, which cover a large proportion of the traditional XRF areas of application. Equally, there continues to be strong interest in portable XRF, particularly in environmental applications—an area that surely still has not reached its zenith. In the field of general applications of the technique, there continues to be strong interest in developments in the environmental, industrial, clinical and biological areas. This was another vigorous year in the development of XRF, some of the more important features of which are highlighted in this review.

Per Roos – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • critical comparison of radiometric and mass spectrometric methods for the determination of radionuclides in environmental biological and nuclear waste samples
    Analytica Chimica Acta, 2008
    Co-Authors: Per Roos
    Abstract:

    The radiometric methods, alpha (α)-, beta (β)-, gamma (γ)-Spectrometry, and mass spectrometric methods, inductively coupled plasma mass Spectrometry, accelerator mass Spectrometry, thermal ioniionization mass Spectrometry, resonance ionization mass Spectrometry, secondary ion mass Spectrometry, and glow discharge mass Spectrometry are reviewed for the determination of radionuclides. These methods are critically compared for the determination of long-lived radionuclides important for radiation protection, decommissioning of nuclear facilities, repository of nuclear waste, tracer application in the environmental and biological researches, these radionuclides include 3H, 14C, 36Cl, 41Ca, 59,63Ni, 89,90Sr, 99Tc, 129I, 135,137Cs, 210Pb, 226,228Ra, 237Np, 241Am, and isotopes of thorium, uranium and plutonium. The application of on-line methods (flow injection/sequential injection) for separation of radionuclides and automated determination of radionuclides is also discussed.

  • Critical comparison of radiometric and mass spectrometric methods for the determination of radionuclides in environmental, biological and nuclear waste samples
    Analytica Chimica Acta, 2008
    Co-Authors: Xiaolin Hou, Per Roos
    Abstract:

    The radiometric methods, alpha (α)-, beta (β)-, gamma (γ)-Spectrometry, and mass spectrometric methods, inductively coupled plasma mass Spectrometry, accelerator mass Spectrometry, thermal ioniionization mass Spectrometry, resonance ionization mass Spectrometry, secondary ion mass Spectrometry, and glow discharge mass Spectrometry are reviewed for the determination of radionuclides. These methods are critically compared for the determination of long-lived radionuclides important for radiation protection, decommissioning of nuclear facilities, repository of nuclear waste, tracer application in the environmental and biological researches, these radionuclides include 3H, 14C, 36Cl, 41Ca, 59,63Ni, 89,90Sr, 99Tc, 129I, 135,137Cs, 210Pb, 226,228Ra, 237Np, 241Am, and isotopes of thorium, uranium and plutonium. The application of on-line methods (flow injection/sequential injection) for separation of radionuclides and automated determination of radionuclides is also discussed. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Andrew T Ellis – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Atomic Spectrometry updata-X-ray fluorescence Spectrometry
    Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry, 2011
    Co-Authors: Margaret West, Andrew T Ellis, Philip J. Potts, Christina Streli, Christine Vanhoof, Dariusz Wegrzynek, Peter Wobrauschek
    Abstract:

    This review covers developments over the period 2010–2011 in XRF instrumentation and detectors, matrix correction and spectrum analysis procedures, X-ray optics and micro-fluorescence, synchrotron XRF, TXRF, portable XRF and on-line systems plus associated applications.

  • Atomic Spectrometry update. X-ray fluorescence Spectrometry
    Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry, 2001
    Co-Authors: Philip J. Potts, Margaret West, Andrew T Ellis, Christina Streli, Christine Vanhoof, Peter Kregsamer, John Marshall, Peter Wobrauschek
    Abstract:

    This annual review of X-ray fluorescence covers developments over the period 2000 2001 in instrumentation and detectors, matrix correction and spectrum analysis software, X-ray optics and microfluorescence, synchrotron XRF, TXRF, portable XRF and on-line applications as assessed from the published literature. The review also covers a survey of applications, including sample preparation, geological, environmental, archaeological, forensic, biological, clinical, thin films, chemical state and speciation studies. During the current review period, publications have demonstrated the development of sub-100 nm X-ray beams for SR microprobe analysis together with the wider use of WD spectrometers in this application. There is evidence of an extension of the application of XRF as a reference technique, with XRF increasingly being used in modern laboratories in place of older wet-chemical methods, and computer-modelling studies continue to be popular in extending the understanding of various XRF phenomena. Some interesting work has been undertaken in the measurement of radiative Auger effects using high-resolution WDXRF instruments. However, the potential for future developments in XRF is illustrated by research into ultra-high resolution microcalorimeter detector devices, which are still at the experimental stage and have not yet progressed to the status of useful practical devices.

  • Atomic Spectrometry update. X-ray fluorescence Spectrometry
    Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry, 1998
    Co-Authors: Andrew T Ellis, Margaret West, Philip J. Potts, Christina Streli, Peter Kregsamer, Michael Holmes, Peter Wobrauschek
    Abstract:

    The current work continues the annual series of reviews of progress in X-ray fluorescence Spectrometry and covers work published during 1997–98. The papers referred to in this review are the ones that in the judgement of the authors made a significant contribution to the advancement of XRF. The style and scope are very similar to earlier reviews in the series (for example, ref. 1), with a comprehensive coverage of all aspects of XRF. There continue to be important developments in the field, notable amongst which are the very high resolution energy dispersive detector devices, specifically microcalorimeter and superconducting tunnel junction devices. Indeed, there is continuing interest in developments in a wide range of solid state detector devices, although mercury(II) iodide is the only detector material yet to challenge Si(Li) or HPGe in some applications. Interest in matrix correction procedures continues to be buoyant, although this year has seen a temporary hiatus in fundamental parameter publications. Laboratory microfluorescence has become well established, not the least because of the availability of commercial instrumentation, some of which incorporates glass capillary optics. Investment in synchrotron radiation facilities continues to be strong, ensuring a continuing stream of research publications. One of the significant trends over the last year has been the large number of TXRF contributions, which cover a large proportion of the traditional XRF areas of application. Equally, there continues to be strong interest in portable XRF, particularly in environmental applications—an area that surely still has not reached its zenith. In the field of general applications of the technique, there continues to be strong interest in developments in the environmental, industrial, clinical and biological areas. This was another vigorous year in the development of XRF, some of the more important features of which are highlighted in this review.