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5 Oxoprolyl Peptidase

The Experts below are selected from a list of 6 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

G Gäde – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The putative ancestral peptide of the adipokinetic/red-pigment-concentrating hormone family isolated and sequenced from a dragonfly.
    Biological chemistry Hoppe-Seyler, 1990
    Co-Authors: G Gäde

    Abstract:

    A neuropeptide with adipokinetic activity in Locusta migratoria and hypertrehalosaemic activity in Periplaneta americana was purified by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography from the corpus cardiacum of the dragonfly, Libellula auripennis. After brief enzymatic digestion by 5OxoprolylPeptidase the primary structure of the peptide was determined by pulsed-liquid phase sequencing employing Edman degradation. As the peptide was not cleaved by carboxyPeptidase the C-terminus was blocked, too. The peptide was assigned as a blocked uncharged octapeptide: Glu-Val-Asn-Phe-Thr-Pro-Ser-TrpNH2. The synthetic peptide was chromatographically indistinguishable from the natural compound and, upon injection in low quantities into dragonflies, elicited mainly haemolymph lipids. Therefore it is called dragonfly adipokinetic hormone (Lia-AKH). It is a new member of the large AKH/RPCH family of peptides. Because of its structural features and its origin from a very primitive insect order it is assumed to represent the putative ancestral peptide of this family. Synthesis was shown to occur in the corpus cardiacum by in vitro incorporation of tritium-labelled Trp into Lia-AKH.

Thomas P. Johnston – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Inhibition of a model protease–pyroglutamate aminoPeptidase by a natural oligosaccharide gum from Hakea gibbosa.
    International Journal of Pharmaceutics, 2001
    Co-Authors: Hemant H. Alur, Ramola P. Desai, Ashim K. Mitra, Thomas P. Johnston

    Abstract:

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the oligosaccharide gum from Hakea gibbosa on the activity of a model protease enzyme pyroglutamate aminoPeptidase (5Oxoprolyl Peptidase; EC 3.4.19.3) and to elucidate the mechanism responsible for the decreased activity. Enzyme kinetic studies were conducted at 37 degrees C in 100 mM potassium phosphate buffer with 10 mM EDTA, 5% (v/v) glycerol, and 5 mM DTT (pH 8) for 15 min and were performed both in the presence and absence of the gum. Enzymatic activity was determined by a colorimetric assay using the specific substrate L-pyroglutamic acid beta-napthylamide. The enzyme kinetics was studied at various substrate and gum concentrations. The velocity of the reaction was determined by the amount of the product (beta-napthylamine) liberated at each substrate and gum concentration. The Ks and Vmax of the enzyme in the absence of the gum were 24.40+/-2.14 microM and 502.95+/-28.90 nmoles x min(-1) x mg protein(-1), respectively. As the concentration of the gum was gradually increased from 0.1 to 2%, the value of the Vmax decreased from 318.94+/-21.46 to 158.83+/-24.51 nmoles x min(-1) x mg protein(-1) while Ks increased from 17.42+/-4.6 to 63.03+/-1.89 microM. The mechanism for the inhibition of the enzyme by Hakea appeared to be a mixed-linear type (a type of non-competitive inhibition) as suggested from Hanes-Woolf, Dixon and Cornish-Bowden plots. The turnover number, kcat, calculated for the enzyme also decreased from 14.09+/-0.81 to 4.45+/-0.69 min(-1) as the concentration of the inhibitor was incrementally increased from 0 to 2% (w/v). The K(i) and alphaK(i) calculated from Dixon and Cornish-Bowden plots were found to be 0.31+/-0.11% (w/v) and 1.33+/-0.42% (w/v), respectively. The natural gum from Hakea gibbosa was effective in non-competitively inhibiting the enzyme pyroglutamate aminoPeptidase. Thus, the natural gum may be a promising additive not only for its sustained-release and mucoadhesive properties as shown previously, but also for its ability to slow the enzymatic degradation of therapeutic polypeptides incorporated in dosage forms.

Hemant H. Alur – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Inhibition of a model protease–pyroglutamate aminoPeptidase by a natural oligosaccharide gum from Hakea gibbosa.
    International Journal of Pharmaceutics, 2001
    Co-Authors: Hemant H. Alur, Ramola P. Desai, Ashim K. Mitra, Thomas P. Johnston

    Abstract:

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the oligosaccharide gum from Hakea gibbosa on the activity of a model protease enzyme pyroglutamate aminoPeptidase (5Oxoprolyl Peptidase; EC 3.4.19.3) and to elucidate the mechanism responsible for the decreased activity. Enzyme kinetic studies were conducted at 37 degrees C in 100 mM potassium phosphate buffer with 10 mM EDTA, 5% (v/v) glycerol, and 5 mM DTT (pH 8) for 15 min and were performed both in the presence and absence of the gum. Enzymatic activity was determined by a colorimetric assay using the specific substrate L-pyroglutamic acid beta-napthylamide. The enzyme kinetics was studied at various substrate and gum concentrations. The velocity of the reaction was determined by the amount of the product (beta-napthylamine) liberated at each substrate and gum concentration. The Ks and Vmax of the enzyme in the absence of the gum were 24.40+/-2.14 microM and 502.95+/-28.90 nmoles x min(-1) x mg protein(-1), respectively. As the concentration of the gum was gradually increased from 0.1 to 2%, the value of the Vmax decreased from 318.94+/-21.46 to 158.83+/-24.51 nmoles x min(-1) x mg protein(-1) while Ks increased from 17.42+/-4.6 to 63.03+/-1.89 microM. The mechanism for the inhibition of the enzyme by Hakea appeared to be a mixed-linear type (a type of non-competitive inhibition) as suggested from Hanes-Woolf, Dixon and Cornish-Bowden plots. The turnover number, kcat, calculated for the enzyme also decreased from 14.09+/-0.81 to 4.45+/-0.69 min(-1) as the concentration of the inhibitor was incrementally increased from 0 to 2% (w/v). The K(i) and alphaK(i) calculated from Dixon and Cornish-Bowden plots were found to be 0.31+/-0.11% (w/v) and 1.33+/-0.42% (w/v), respectively. The natural gum from Hakea gibbosa was effective in non-competitively inhibiting the enzyme pyroglutamate aminoPeptidase. Thus, the natural gum may be a promising additive not only for its sustained-release and mucoadhesive properties as shown previously, but also for its ability to slow the enzymatic degradation of therapeutic polypeptides incorporated in dosage forms.