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Alan B Lumsden – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • acute occlusion of the Abdominal Aorta
    American Journal of Surgery, 1998
    Co-Authors: Scott M Surowiec, Halit Isiklar, Suha Sreeram, Victor J Weiss, Alan B Lumsden

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background: Acute aortic occlusion most commonly results from aortic saddle embolus or thrombosis of an atherosclerotic Abdominal Aorta. The purpose of this study was to review the experience at a university hospital to better define the diagnosis and management of this uncommon process. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed from patients admitted to Emory University Hospital with acute occlusion of the Abdominal Aorta from 1985 through 1997. Results: Thirty-three patients were identified. In group EMB (n = 16), occlusion was due to saddle embolus. In group IST (n = 17), occlusion was attributed to in situ thrombosis of a severely diseased Aorta. Operative procedures performed included transfemoral embolectomy (15), aortobifemoral bypass (9), axillobifemoral bypass (5), fasciotomy (3), and thrombolysis (1). The in-hospital mortality rate was 21% (31% EMB, 12% IST), and morbidity was significant and included mesenteric ischemia (6%), bleeding complications (9%), subsequent amputation (12%), renal failure (15%), recurrent embolization or thrombosis (21%), and cardiac complications (42%). Conclusions: Acute aortic occlusion has tremendous morbidity and mortality even with optimal surgical care.

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Scott M Surowiec – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • acute occlusion of the Abdominal Aorta
    American Journal of Surgery, 1998
    Co-Authors: Scott M Surowiec, Halit Isiklar, Suha Sreeram, Victor J Weiss, Alan B Lumsden

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background: Acute aortic occlusion most commonly results from aortic saddle embolus or thrombosis of an atherosclerotic Abdominal Aorta. The purpose of this study was to review the experience at a university hospital to better define the diagnosis and management of this uncommon process. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed from patients admitted to Emory University Hospital with acute occlusion of the Abdominal Aorta from 1985 through 1997. Results: Thirty-three patients were identified. In group EMB (n = 16), occlusion was due to saddle embolus. In group IST (n = 17), occlusion was attributed to in situ thrombosis of a severely diseased Aorta. Operative procedures performed included transfemoral embolectomy (15), aortobifemoral bypass (9), axillobifemoral bypass (5), fasciotomy (3), and thrombolysis (1). The in-hospital mortality rate was 21% (31% EMB, 12% IST), and morbidity was significant and included mesenteric ischemia (6%), bleeding complications (9%), subsequent amputation (12%), renal failure (15%), recurrent embolization or thrombosis (21%), and cardiac complications (42%). Conclusions: Acute aortic occlusion has tremendous morbidity and mortality even with optimal surgical care.

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Lucian Florin Dorobantu – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Dissection of the Abdominal Aorta
    New Approaches to Aortic Diseases from Valve to Abdominal Bifurcation, 2018
    Co-Authors: Lucian Florin Dorobantu

    Abstract:

    Abstract Aortic dissection is rarely limited to the Abdominal Aorta. Usually, it involves the thoracic Aorta and may extend in an antegrade fashion into the Abdominal Aorta. Isolated and spontaneous dissection of the Abdominal Aorta (not associated with blunt trauma or with descending thoracic aortic dissection) represents less than 2% of all aortic dissections. There are not large series of isolated acute aortic Abdominal dissection (IAAAD) reported in the literature, this situation being considered exceptional. There are no typical symptoms and signs for IAAAD. Abdominal pain is the most frequent symptom, although dissection may be painless. Usually the dissection of the Abdominal Aorta is diagnosed spontaneously in asymptomatic patients during computed tomography examination for other reasons. There are few data regarding the strategies of management of the IAAAD. Because of the small number of patients, there are no guidelines of definitive treatment. In our opinion, asymptomatic patients with a normal Aorta as well as the patients in whom the initial pain resolves and with no other complication should be treated medically, with antihypertensive medication and beta blockers. The presence of complications, such as unrelenting pain despite the blood pressure control, pulse deficits, limb ischemia, mesenteric ischemia or infraction, acute renal failure, must be treated surgically. The goal of the surgical treatment of the aortic dissection is to close the entry site and decompress the false lumen. The standard procedure is the open surgery. It consists of replacing the affected segment of the Aorta with a Dacron graft. The endovascular approach is the modern alternative to the standard procedure.

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