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Abdominal Migraine

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Miguel Saps – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The Effects of the Rome IV Criteria on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Practice
    Current Gastroenterology Reports, 2020
    Co-Authors: Desiree F. Baaleman, Marc A. Benninga, Carlo Di Lorenzo, Miguel Saps
    Abstract:

    Purpose of Review To evaluate the impact of the implementation of the Rome IV criteria on pediatric gastrointestinal practice. Recent Findings In 2016, the Rome IV criteria were published, providing an update of symptom-based criteria to diagnose children with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). Summary For neonates and toddlers, Wessel’s criteria for diagnosing infant colic were abandoned, and a differentiation was made between toilet-trained and non-toilet-trained children in the diagnosis of functional constipation. For children and adolescents, two new disorders (functional nausea and functional vomiting) are described, and in the diagnosis of functional dyspepsia, pain does not have to be the chief complaint anymore. This change has made functional dyspepsia the most common functional Abdominal pain disorder, exceeding the prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Lastly, the diagnosis of Abdominal Migraine was narrowed, causing an appropriate drop in its prevalence.

  • The Effects of the Rome IV Criteria on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Practice
    Current gastroenterology reports, 2020
    Co-Authors: Desiree F. Baaleman, Marc A. Benninga, Carlo Di Lorenzo, Miguel Saps
    Abstract:

    To evaluate the impact of the implementation of the Rome IV criteria on pediatric gastrointestinal practice. In 2016, the Rome IV criteria were published, providing an update of symptom-based criteria to diagnose children with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). For neonates and toddlers, Wessel’s criteria for diagnosing infant colic were abandoned, and a differentiation was made between toilet-trained and non-toilet-trained children in the diagnosis of functional constipation. For children and adolescents, two new disorders (functional nausea and functional vomiting) are described, and in the diagnosis of functional dyspepsia, pain does not have to be the chief complaint anymore. This change has made functional dyspepsia the most common functional Abdominal pain disorder, exceeding the prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Lastly, the diagnosis of Abdominal Migraine was narrowed, causing an appropriate drop in its prevalence.

Marc A. Benninga – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The Effects of the Rome IV Criteria on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Practice
    Current Gastroenterology Reports, 2020
    Co-Authors: Desiree F. Baaleman, Marc A. Benninga, Carlo Di Lorenzo, Miguel Saps
    Abstract:

    Purpose of Review To evaluate the impact of the implementation of the Rome IV criteria on pediatric gastrointestinal practice. Recent Findings In 2016, the Rome IV criteria were published, providing an update of symptom-based criteria to diagnose children with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). Summary For neonates and toddlers, Wessel’s criteria for diagnosing infant colic were abandoned, and a differentiation was made between toilet-trained and non-toilet-trained children in the diagnosis of functional constipation. For children and adolescents, two new disorders (functional nausea and functional vomiting) are described, and in the diagnosis of functional dyspepsia, pain does not have to be the chief complaint anymore. This change has made functional dyspepsia the most common functional Abdominal pain disorder, exceeding the prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Lastly, the diagnosis of Abdominal Migraine was narrowed, causing an appropriate drop in its prevalence.

  • The Effects of the Rome IV Criteria on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Practice
    Current gastroenterology reports, 2020
    Co-Authors: Desiree F. Baaleman, Marc A. Benninga, Carlo Di Lorenzo, Miguel Saps
    Abstract:

    To evaluate the impact of the implementation of the Rome IV criteria on pediatric gastrointestinal practice. In 2016, the Rome IV criteria were published, providing an update of symptom-based criteria to diagnose children with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). For neonates and toddlers, Wessel’s criteria for diagnosing infant colic were abandoned, and a differentiation was made between toilet-trained and non-toilet-trained children in the diagnosis of functional constipation. For children and adolescents, two new disorders (functional nausea and functional vomiting) are described, and in the diagnosis of functional dyspepsia, pain does not have to be the chief complaint anymore. This change has made functional dyspepsia the most common functional Abdominal pain disorder, exceeding the prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Lastly, the diagnosis of Abdominal Migraine was narrowed, causing an appropriate drop in its prevalence.

  • Abdominal Migraine in children: association between gastric motility parameters and clinical characteristics
    BMC gastroenterology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Niranga Manjuri Devanarayana, Shaman Rajindrajith, Marc A. Benninga
    Abstract:

    Approximately 0.2–1 % of children suffers from Abdominal Migraine (AM). Pathophysiology of AM has not been adequately studied. This study evaluated gastric motility in children with AM. Seventeen children (6 boys), within an age range of 4–15 years, referred to a tertiary care paediatric unit, North Colombo Teaching Hospital Ragama, Sri Lanka, from 2007 to 2012, were screened. Those fulfilling Rome III criteria for AM were recruited after obtaining parental consent. None had clinical or laboratory evidence of organic disorders. Twenty healthy children (8 boys), with an age range of 4–14 years, were recruited as controls. Liquid gastric emptying rate (GE) and antral motility parameters were assessed using an ultrasound method. Average GE (41.6 % vs. 66.2 %, in controls), amplitude of antral contractions (A) (57.9 % vs. 89.0 %) and antral motility index (MI) (5.0 vs. 8.3) were lower and fasting antral area (1.8 cm2 vs. 0.6 cm2) was higher in children with AM (p 

Desiree F. Baaleman – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The Effects of the Rome IV Criteria on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Practice
    Current Gastroenterology Reports, 2020
    Co-Authors: Desiree F. Baaleman, Marc A. Benninga, Carlo Di Lorenzo, Miguel Saps
    Abstract:

    Purpose of Review To evaluate the impact of the implementation of the Rome IV criteria on pediatric gastrointestinal practice. Recent Findings In 2016, the Rome IV criteria were published, providing an update of symptom-based criteria to diagnose children with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). Summary For neonates and toddlers, Wessel’s criteria for diagnosing infant colic were abandoned, and a differentiation was made between toilet-trained and non-toilet-trained children in the diagnosis of functional constipation. For children and adolescents, two new disorders (functional nausea and functional vomiting) are described, and in the diagnosis of functional dyspepsia, pain does not have to be the chief complaint anymore. This change has made functional dyspepsia the most common functional Abdominal pain disorder, exceeding the prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Lastly, the diagnosis of Abdominal Migraine was narrowed, causing an appropriate drop in its prevalence.

  • The Effects of the Rome IV Criteria on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Practice
    Current gastroenterology reports, 2020
    Co-Authors: Desiree F. Baaleman, Marc A. Benninga, Carlo Di Lorenzo, Miguel Saps
    Abstract:

    To evaluate the impact of the implementation of the Rome IV criteria on pediatric gastrointestinal practice. In 2016, the Rome IV criteria were published, providing an update of symptom-based criteria to diagnose children with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). For neonates and toddlers, Wessel’s criteria for diagnosing infant colic were abandoned, and a differentiation was made between toilet-trained and non-toilet-trained children in the diagnosis of functional constipation. For children and adolescents, two new disorders (functional nausea and functional vomiting) are described, and in the diagnosis of functional dyspepsia, pain does not have to be the chief complaint anymore. This change has made functional dyspepsia the most common functional Abdominal pain disorder, exceeding the prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Lastly, the diagnosis of Abdominal Migraine was narrowed, causing an appropriate drop in its prevalence.