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Marjolein Y. Berger – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Childhood Abdominal Pain in primary care: design and patient selection of the HONEUR Abdominal Pain cohort
    BMC family practice, 2010
    Co-Authors: Leo A A Spee, Arjan P J M Van Den Hurk, Yvonne Lisman-van Leeuwen, Marc A. Benninga, Sita M A Bierma-zeinstra, Jan Passchier, Marjolein Y. Berger

    Abstract:

    Background: Abdominal Pain in children is a common complaint presented to the GP. However, the prognosis and prognostic factors of childhood Abdominal Pain are almost exclusively studied in referred children. This cohort study aims at describing prognosis and prognostic factors of childhood Abdominal Pain in primary care. In this paper we describe methods used for data-collection and determine possible selective recruitment. Methods/Design: We conducted an observational, prospective cohort study with a 1-year follow-up. From May 2004 to March 2006, 53 Dutch GPs recruited consecutive children aged 4-17 years with a new episode of Abdominal Pain not preceded by a consultation for this complaint in the previous 3 months. Participants filled in standardized questionnaires, and faeces and urine were sampled. To evaluate selective recruitment, the electronic medical records of participating GPs were retrospectively searched for eligible non-included children. Discussion: This study allows us to describe prognosis and prognostic factors of childhood Abdominal Pain in primary care. A total of 305 children were included of whom 142 (46.6%) met predefined criteria for chronic/ recurrent Abdominal Pain at presentation; from the total group of eligible children identified from the electronic medical record, 27% were included. The included children were significantly younger than non-included children (mean age 8.49 and 9.20 years). In proportion to identified eligible children, significantly less children diagnosed with “gastroenteritis” (6.8%) and significantly more children with “generalized Abdominal Pain” (39%) were included compared to the 27% that was expected. This cohort represents young school-aged children consulting GPs for a new episode of Abdominal Pain, not diagnosed as gastroenteritis. Almost half of them fulfil the criteria for chronic Abdominal Pain at presentation. Background Abdominal Pain is a frequent reason to consult the primary care physician. The prevalence of recurrent Abdominal Pain in school-aged children in Western countries ranges from 0.3 to 19% [1]. In the Netherlands Abdominal Pain in children is responsible for 2.5% of all childhood consultations in primary care and has a oneyear prevalence rate of 63 per 1000 registered children [2]. About 25% of these children will visit their general practitioner (GP) more than once a year for this complaint. In 80% of the children the GP finally diagnoses

  • Childhood Abdominal Pain in primary care: design and patient selection of the HONEUR Abdominal Pain cohort
    BMC Family Practice, 2010
    Co-Authors: Leo A A Spee, Arjan P J M Van Den Hurk, Marc A. Benninga, Sita M A Bierma-zeinstra, Jan Passchier, Yvonne Van Leeuwen, Marjolein Y. Berger

    Abstract:

    Background Abdominal Pain in children is a common complaint presented to the GP. However, the prognosis and prognostic factors of childhood Abdominal Pain are almost exclusively studied in referred children. This cohort study aims at describing prognosis and prognostic factors of childhood Abdominal Pain in primary care. In this paper we describe methods used for data-collection and determine possible selective recruitment. Methods/Design We conducted an observational, prospective cohort study with a 1-year follow-up. From May 2004 to March 2006, 53 Dutch GPs recruited consecutive children aged 4-17 years with a new episode of Abdominal Pain not preceded by a consultation for this complaint in the previous 3 months. Participants filled in standardized questionnaires, and faeces and urine were sampled. To evaluate selective recruitment, the electronic medical records of participating GPs were retrospectively searched for eligible non-included children. Discussion This study allows us to describe prognosis and prognostic factors of childhood Abdominal Pain in primary care. A total of 305 children were included of whom 142 (46.6%) met predefined criteria for chronic/recurrent Abdominal Pain at presentation; from the total group of eligible children identified from the electronic medical record, 27% were included. The included children were significantly younger than non-included children (mean age 8.49 and 9.20 years). In proportion to identified eligible children, significantly less children diagnosed with “gastroenteritis” (6.8%) and significantly more children with “generalized Abdominal Pain” (39%) were included compared to the 27% that was expected. This cohort represents young school-aged children consulting GPs for a new episode of Abdominal Pain, not diagnosed as gastroenteritis. Almost half of them fulfil the criteria for chronic Abdominal Pain at presentation.

  • Chronic Abdominal Pain in children.
    BMJ (Clinical research ed.), 2007
    Co-Authors: Marjolein Y. Berger, Marieke J. Gieteling, Marc A. Benninga

    Abstract:

    Chronic Abdominal Pain is a common disorder in children and adolescents worldwide. It affects the child’s wellbeing, and the costs from missed school days and use of healthcare resources are high.

    Children with chronic Abdominal Pain represent a heterogeneous population comprising both organic and functional gastrointestinal disorders. Functional disorders are those that cannot be explained by structural or biochemical abnormalities. Differences in prevalence of organic disease are reported depending on the setting, ranging from 5% in the general population to 40% in a paediatric gastroenterologist practice.1 General practitioners feel confident in labelling chronic Abdominal Pain as an easy to manage functional disorder. After minimal further testing, these children and their parents can be reassured by explaining that the symptoms are common and rarely associated with disease. However, when diagnostic uncertainty increases, Pain does not resolve over time, or parents are hard to reassure, extensive testing and referral easily set in. As a consequence paediatricians perceive chronic Abdominal Pain as a time consuming and therapy resistant disorder.

    #### SUMMARY POINTS

    #### Sources and selection criteria

    We used the Cochrane library to identify relevant systematic reviews that evaluated the effectiveness of pharmaceutical, psychological, and complementary interventions for chronic Abdominal Pain in children.

    Medline searches were used to find relevant systematic reviews on diagnosis and treatment of Abdominal Pain in children using the keywords “Abdominal

Marc A. Benninga – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Childhood functional Abdominal Pain: mechanisms and management
    Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Judith Korterink, Niranga Manjuri Devanarayana, Shaman Rajindrajith, Arine Vlieger, Marc A. Benninga

    Abstract:

    Chronic Abdominal Pain is common in children, but poorly understood. This Review summarizes the mechanisms and management of childhood functional Abdominal Pain in a bid to improve understanding and quality of care. The article provides up-to-date information on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutic management of this common childhood condition. Chronic Abdominal Pain is one of the most common clinical syndromes encountered in day to day clinical paediatric practice. Although common, its definition is confusing, predisposing factors are poorly understood and the pathophysiological mechanisms are not clear. The prevailing viewpoint in the pathogenesis involves the inter-relationship between changes in hypersensitivity and altered motility, to which several risk factors have been linked. Making a diagnosis of functional Abdominal Pain can be a challenge, as it is unclear which further diagnostic tests are necessary to exclude an organic cause. Moreover, large, well-performed, high-quality clinical trials for effective agents are lacking, which undermines evidence-based treatment. This Review summarizes current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, risk factors and diagnostic work-up of functional Abdominal Pain. Finally, management options for children with functional Abdominal Pain are discussed including medications, dietary interventions, probiotics and psychological and complementary therapies, to improve understanding and to maximize the quality of care for children with this condition. Functional Abdominal Pain is a common problem in childhood worldwide Currently, children with functional Abdominal Pain are diagnosed with one of the AbdominalPain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGIDs) defined by the Rome III criteria The Rome criteria have encouraged health-care workers to make a positive diagnosis and have advanced empirical research in childhood AP-FGIDs Increased knowledge of the pathophysiology of AP-FGIDs has led to a biopsychosocial model in which genetic, physiological and psychological factors interplay To date, high-quality efficacy studies on treatment in paediatric AP-FGIDs are scarce Available evidence indicates beneficial effects of hypnotherapy and cognitive behaviour family therapy; evidence for a low FODMAP diet, probiotics, peppermint oil, cyproheptadine or famotidine is promising

  • Childhood Abdominal Pain in primary care: design and patient selection of the HONEUR Abdominal Pain cohort
    BMC family practice, 2010
    Co-Authors: Leo A A Spee, Arjan P J M Van Den Hurk, Yvonne Lisman-van Leeuwen, Marc A. Benninga, Sita M A Bierma-zeinstra, Jan Passchier, Marjolein Y. Berger

    Abstract:

    Background: Abdominal Pain in children is a common complaint presented to the GP. However, the prognosis and prognostic factors of childhood Abdominal Pain are almost exclusively studied in referred children. This cohort study aims at describing prognosis and prognostic factors of childhood Abdominal Pain in primary care. In this paper we describe methods used for data-collection and determine possible selective recruitment. Methods/Design: We conducted an observational, prospective cohort study with a 1-year follow-up. From May 2004 to March 2006, 53 Dutch GPs recruited consecutive children aged 4-17 years with a new episode of Abdominal Pain not preceded by a consultation for this complaint in the previous 3 months. Participants filled in standardized questionnaires, and faeces and urine were sampled. To evaluate selective recruitment, the electronic medical records of participating GPs were retrospectively searched for eligible non-included children. Discussion: This study allows us to describe prognosis and prognostic factors of childhood Abdominal Pain in primary care. A total of 305 children were included of whom 142 (46.6%) met predefined criteria for chronic/ recurrent Abdominal Pain at presentation; from the total group of eligible children identified from the electronic medical record, 27% were included. The included children were significantly younger than non-included children (mean age 8.49 and 9.20 years). In proportion to identified eligible children, significantly less children diagnosed with “gastroenteritis” (6.8%) and significantly more children with “generalized Abdominal Pain” (39%) were included compared to the 27% that was expected. This cohort represents young school-aged children consulting GPs for a new episode of Abdominal Pain, not diagnosed as gastroenteritis. Almost half of them fulfil the criteria for chronic Abdominal Pain at presentation. Background Abdominal Pain is a frequent reason to consult the primary care physician. The prevalence of recurrent Abdominal Pain in school-aged children in Western countries ranges from 0.3 to 19% [1]. In the Netherlands Abdominal Pain in children is responsible for 2.5% of all childhood consultations in primary care and has a oneyear prevalence rate of 63 per 1000 registered children [2]. About 25% of these children will visit their general practitioner (GP) more than once a year for this complaint. In 80% of the children the GP finally diagnoses

  • Childhood Abdominal Pain in primary care: design and patient selection of the HONEUR Abdominal Pain cohort
    BMC Family Practice, 2010
    Co-Authors: Leo A A Spee, Arjan P J M Van Den Hurk, Marc A. Benninga, Sita M A Bierma-zeinstra, Jan Passchier, Yvonne Van Leeuwen, Marjolein Y. Berger

    Abstract:

    Background Abdominal Pain in children is a common complaint presented to the GP. However, the prognosis and prognostic factors of childhood Abdominal Pain are almost exclusively studied in referred children. This cohort study aims at describing prognosis and prognostic factors of childhood Abdominal Pain in primary care. In this paper we describe methods used for data-collection and determine possible selective recruitment. Methods/Design We conducted an observational, prospective cohort study with a 1-year follow-up. From May 2004 to March 2006, 53 Dutch GPs recruited consecutive children aged 4-17 years with a new episode of Abdominal Pain not preceded by a consultation for this complaint in the previous 3 months. Participants filled in standardized questionnaires, and faeces and urine were sampled. To evaluate selective recruitment, the electronic medical records of participating GPs were retrospectively searched for eligible non-included children. Discussion This study allows us to describe prognosis and prognostic factors of childhood Abdominal Pain in primary care. A total of 305 children were included of whom 142 (46.6%) met predefined criteria for chronic/recurrent Abdominal Pain at presentation; from the total group of eligible children identified from the electronic medical record, 27% were included. The included children were significantly younger than non-included children (mean age 8.49 and 9.20 years). In proportion to identified eligible children, significantly less children diagnosed with “gastroenteritis” (6.8%) and significantly more children with “generalized Abdominal Pain” (39%) were included compared to the 27% that was expected. This cohort represents young school-aged children consulting GPs for a new episode of Abdominal Pain, not diagnosed as gastroenteritis. Almost half of them fulfil the criteria for chronic Abdominal Pain at presentation.

Leo A A Spee – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Childhood Abdominal Pain in primary care: design and patient selection of the HONEUR Abdominal Pain cohort
    BMC family practice, 2010
    Co-Authors: Leo A A Spee, Arjan P J M Van Den Hurk, Yvonne Lisman-van Leeuwen, Marc A. Benninga, Sita M A Bierma-zeinstra, Jan Passchier, Marjolein Y. Berger

    Abstract:

    Background: Abdominal Pain in children is a common complaint presented to the GP. However, the prognosis and prognostic factors of childhood Abdominal Pain are almost exclusively studied in referred children. This cohort study aims at describing prognosis and prognostic factors of childhood Abdominal Pain in primary care. In this paper we describe methods used for data-collection and determine possible selective recruitment. Methods/Design: We conducted an observational, prospective cohort study with a 1-year follow-up. From May 2004 to March 2006, 53 Dutch GPs recruited consecutive children aged 4-17 years with a new episode of Abdominal Pain not preceded by a consultation for this complaint in the previous 3 months. Participants filled in standardized questionnaires, and faeces and urine were sampled. To evaluate selective recruitment, the electronic medical records of participating GPs were retrospectively searched for eligible non-included children. Discussion: This study allows us to describe prognosis and prognostic factors of childhood Abdominal Pain in primary care. A total of 305 children were included of whom 142 (46.6%) met predefined criteria for chronic/ recurrent Abdominal Pain at presentation; from the total group of eligible children identified from the electronic medical record, 27% were included. The included children were significantly younger than non-included children (mean age 8.49 and 9.20 years). In proportion to identified eligible children, significantly less children diagnosed with “gastroenteritis” (6.8%) and significantly more children with “generalized Abdominal Pain” (39%) were included compared to the 27% that was expected. This cohort represents young school-aged children consulting GPs for a new episode of Abdominal Pain, not diagnosed as gastroenteritis. Almost half of them fulfil the criteria for chronic Abdominal Pain at presentation. Background Abdominal Pain is a frequent reason to consult the primary care physician. The prevalence of recurrent Abdominal Pain in school-aged children in Western countries ranges from 0.3 to 19% [1]. In the Netherlands Abdominal Pain in children is responsible for 2.5% of all childhood consultations in primary care and has a oneyear prevalence rate of 63 per 1000 registered children [2]. About 25% of these children will visit their general practitioner (GP) more than once a year for this complaint. In 80% of the children the GP finally diagnoses

  • Childhood Abdominal Pain in primary care: design and patient selection of the HONEUR Abdominal Pain cohort
    BMC Family Practice, 2010
    Co-Authors: Leo A A Spee, Arjan P J M Van Den Hurk, Marc A. Benninga, Sita M A Bierma-zeinstra, Jan Passchier, Yvonne Van Leeuwen, Marjolein Y. Berger

    Abstract:

    Background Abdominal Pain in children is a common complaint presented to the GP. However, the prognosis and prognostic factors of childhood Abdominal Pain are almost exclusively studied in referred children. This cohort study aims at describing prognosis and prognostic factors of childhood Abdominal Pain in primary care. In this paper we describe methods used for data-collection and determine possible selective recruitment. Methods/Design We conducted an observational, prospective cohort study with a 1-year follow-up. From May 2004 to March 2006, 53 Dutch GPs recruited consecutive children aged 4-17 years with a new episode of Abdominal Pain not preceded by a consultation for this complaint in the previous 3 months. Participants filled in standardized questionnaires, and faeces and urine were sampled. To evaluate selective recruitment, the electronic medical records of participating GPs were retrospectively searched for eligible non-included children. Discussion This study allows us to describe prognosis and prognostic factors of childhood Abdominal Pain in primary care. A total of 305 children were included of whom 142 (46.6%) met predefined criteria for chronic/recurrent Abdominal Pain at presentation; from the total group of eligible children identified from the electronic medical record, 27% were included. The included children were significantly younger than non-included children (mean age 8.49 and 9.20 years). In proportion to identified eligible children, significantly less children diagnosed with “gastroenteritis” (6.8%) and significantly more children with “generalized Abdominal Pain” (39%) were included compared to the 27% that was expected. This cohort represents young school-aged children consulting GPs for a new episode of Abdominal Pain, not diagnosed as gastroenteritis. Almost half of them fulfil the criteria for chronic Abdominal Pain at presentation.