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Abdominal Radiography

The Experts below are selected from a list of 318 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Mariepierre Revel – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Detection of residual packets in cocaine body packers: low accuracy of Abdominal Radiography—a prospective study
    European Radiology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Pascal Rousset, Pierrefleury Chaillot, Etienne Audureau, Bertrand Becour, Isabelle Fitton, Dominique Vadrot, Caroline Rey-salmon, Mariepierre Revel

    Abstract:

    Objective To evaluate the accuracy of Abdominal Radiography (AXR) for the detection of residual cocaine packets by comparison with computed tomography (CT). Methods Over a 1-year period unenhanced CT was systematically performed in addition to AXR for pre-discharge evaluation of cocaine body packers. AXR and CT were interpreted independently by two radiologists blinded to clinical outcome. Patient and packet characteristics were compared between the groups with residual portage and complete decontamination. Results Among 138 body packers studied, 14 (10 %) had one residual packet identified on pre-discharge CT. On AXR, at least one reader failed to detect the residual packet in 10 (70 %) of these 14 body packers. The sensitivity and specificity of AXR were 28.6 % (95 % CI: 8.4–58.1) and 100.0 % (95 % CI: 97.0–100.0) for reader 1 and 35.7 % (95 % CI: 12.8–64.9) and 97.6 % (95 % CI: 93.1–99.5) for reader 2. There were no significant patient or packet characteristics predictive of residual portage or AXR false negativity. All positive CT results were confirmed by delayed expulsion or surgical findings, while negative results were confirmed by further surveillance. Conclusion Given the poor performance of AXR, CT should be systematically performed to ensure safe hospital discharge of cocaine body packers. Key Points • Both Abdominal Radiography and computed tomography can identify gastrointestinal cocaine packets. • Ten per cent of body packers had residual packets despite two packet-free stools. • Seventy per cent of these residual packets were missed on AXR. • No patient or packet characteristics predicted residual packets or AXR false negativity. • CT is necessary to ensure safe medical discharge of body packers.

  • detection of residual packets in cocaine body packers low accuracy of Abdominal Radiography a prospective study
    European Radiology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Pascal Rousset, Pierrefleury Chaillot, Etienne Audureau, Caroline Reysalmon, Bertrand Becour, Isabelle Fitton, Dominique Vadrot, Mariepierre Revel

    Abstract:

    To evaluate the accuracy of Abdominal Radiography (AXR) for the detection of residual cocaine packets by comparison with computed tomography (CT). Over a 1-year period unenhanced CT was systematically performed in addition to AXR for pre-discharge evaluation of cocaine body packers. AXR and CT were interpreted independently by two radiologists blinded to clinical outcome. Patient and packet characteristics were compared between the groups with residual portage and complete decontamination. Among 138 body packers studied, 14 (10 %) had one residual packet identified on pre-discharge CT. On AXR, at least one reader failed to detect the residual packet in 10 (70 %) of these 14 body packers. The sensitivity and specificity of AXR were 28.6 % (95 % CI: 8.4–58.1) and 100.0 % (95 % CI: 97.0–100.0) for reader 1 and 35.7 % (95 % CI: 12.8–64.9) and 97.6 % (95 % CI: 93.1–99.5) for reader 2. There were no significant patient or packet characteristics predictive of residual portage or AXR false negativity. All positive CT results were confirmed by delayed expulsion or surgical findings, while negative results were confirmed by further surveillance. Given the poor performance of AXR, CT should be systematically performed to ensure safe hospital discharge of cocaine body packers. • Both Abdominal Radiography and computed tomography can identify gastrointestinal cocaine packets.
    • Ten per cent of body packers had residual packets despite two packet-free stools.
    • Seventy per cent of these residual packets were missed on AXR.
    • No patient or packet characteristics predicted residual packets or AXR false negativity.
    • CT is necessary to ensure safe medical discharge of body packers.

Pascal Rousset – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Detection of residual packets in cocaine body packers: low accuracy of Abdominal Radiography—a prospective study
    European Radiology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Pascal Rousset, Pierrefleury Chaillot, Etienne Audureau, Bertrand Becour, Isabelle Fitton, Dominique Vadrot, Caroline Rey-salmon, Mariepierre Revel

    Abstract:

    Objective To evaluate the accuracy of Abdominal Radiography (AXR) for the detection of residual cocaine packets by comparison with computed tomography (CT). Methods Over a 1-year period unenhanced CT was systematically performed in addition to AXR for pre-discharge evaluation of cocaine body packers. AXR and CT were interpreted independently by two radiologists blinded to clinical outcome. Patient and packet characteristics were compared between the groups with residual portage and complete decontamination. Results Among 138 body packers studied, 14 (10 %) had one residual packet identified on pre-discharge CT. On AXR, at least one reader failed to detect the residual packet in 10 (70 %) of these 14 body packers. The sensitivity and specificity of AXR were 28.6 % (95 % CI: 8.4–58.1) and 100.0 % (95 % CI: 97.0–100.0) for reader 1 and 35.7 % (95 % CI: 12.8–64.9) and 97.6 % (95 % CI: 93.1–99.5) for reader 2. There were no significant patient or packet characteristics predictive of residual portage or AXR false negativity. All positive CT results were confirmed by delayed expulsion or surgical findings, while negative results were confirmed by further surveillance. Conclusion Given the poor performance of AXR, CT should be systematically performed to ensure safe hospital discharge of cocaine body packers. Key Points • Both Abdominal Radiography and computed tomography can identify gastrointestinal cocaine packets. • Ten per cent of body packers had residual packets despite two packet-free stools. • Seventy per cent of these residual packets were missed on AXR. • No patient or packet characteristics predicted residual packets or AXR false negativity. • CT is necessary to ensure safe medical discharge of body packers.

  • detection of residual packets in cocaine body packers low accuracy of Abdominal Radiography a prospective study
    European Radiology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Pascal Rousset, Pierrefleury Chaillot, Etienne Audureau, Caroline Reysalmon, Bertrand Becour, Isabelle Fitton, Dominique Vadrot, Mariepierre Revel

    Abstract:

    To evaluate the accuracy of Abdominal Radiography (AXR) for the detection of residual cocaine packets by comparison with computed tomography (CT). Over a 1-year period unenhanced CT was systematically performed in addition to AXR for pre-discharge evaluation of cocaine body packers. AXR and CT were interpreted independently by two radiologists blinded to clinical outcome. Patient and packet characteristics were compared between the groups with residual portage and complete decontamination. Among 138 body packers studied, 14 (10 %) had one residual packet identified on pre-discharge CT. On AXR, at least one reader failed to detect the residual packet in 10 (70 %) of these 14 body packers. The sensitivity and specificity of AXR were 28.6 % (95 % CI: 8.4–58.1) and 100.0 % (95 % CI: 97.0–100.0) for reader 1 and 35.7 % (95 % CI: 12.8–64.9) and 97.6 % (95 % CI: 93.1–99.5) for reader 2. There were no significant patient or packet characteristics predictive of residual portage or AXR false negativity. All positive CT results were confirmed by delayed expulsion or surgical findings, while negative results were confirmed by further surveillance. Given the poor performance of AXR, CT should be systematically performed to ensure safe hospital discharge of cocaine body packers. • Both Abdominal Radiography and computed tomography can identify gastrointestinal cocaine packets.
    • Ten per cent of body packers had residual packets despite two packet-free stools.
    • Seventy per cent of these residual packets were missed on AXR.
    • No patient or packet characteristics predicted residual packets or AXR false negativity.
    • CT is necessary to ensure safe medical discharge of body packers.

Sankar Sinha – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • plain Abdominal Radiography in acute Abdominal pain is it really necessary
    Emergency Radiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Mark Fiorentino, Sadhishaan Sreedharan, Sankar Sinha

    Abstract:

    The aims of this study are to audit the ordering of Abdominal radiographs (AXR) in the emergency department (ED) and evaluate the current practices, knowledge and attitudes of emergency physicians with regard to ordering AXRs in patients presenting with acute Abdominal pain. A retrospective study was undertaken at an ED of a tertiary hospital in Tasmania using clinical notes on patient presenting with acute Abdominal pain who underwent an AXR. The study also included a short questionnaire, which assessed emergency physicians’ knowledge of current imaging guidelines and clinical practice when ordering an AXR. During the study period, 108 patients satisfied the selection criteria, and the AXR was reported as normal in 76 % (n = 82; p value <0.05), non-specific in 12 % (n = 13; p value <0.05) and abnormal in 12 % (n = 13; p value <0.05) of patients. Of those patients, 25 % (n = 27) of the AXRs did not meet indications listed in the Diagnostic Imaging Pathways published by the Western Australia Department of Health and were found not to benefit patient care. Of the 19 doctors who completed the survey, only 16 % (n = 3) were aware of any clinical guidelines for imaging in this setting. Current guidelines should be followed when ordering imaging for patients with acute Abdominal pain to minimise unnecessary patient radiation exposure, avoid delays in diagnosis and definitive patient management, reduce costs and therefore increase efficiency in ED.