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Abdominal Radiotherapy

The Experts below are selected from a list of 276 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Frank Verhaegen – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • WE‐A‐BRA‐03: Towards Real‐Time Ultrasound Image‐Guided Abdominal Radiotherapy
    Medical Physics, 2012
    Co-Authors: S Van Der Meer, John Wong, E Bloemen, Davide Fontanarosa, M Lachaine, Frank Verhaegen

    Abstract:

    Purpose: Accurate tumor positioning in stereotactic body Radiotherapy of Abdominal lesions is often hampered by organ motion and set‐up errors. The problems of the daily variation (interfractional motion) in tumor position can be partially corrected with on‐line soft‐tissue image‐guidedRadiotherapy. However, a greater challenge is to also capture the movement during treatment (intrafractional motion). Methods: To study the feasibility of Abdominal real‐time volumetric soft‐tissue image‐guidance with ultrasound(US)imaging, we are investigating several aspects each with their own challenges: 3DUS volumetric imaging, 2DUS time series of the organ motion, roboticUS probe placement, US auto‐contouring and contrast enhanced US (CEUS). Results: Currently, 3DUS imaging is used first to correct for the set‐up errors as well as interfractional organ motion. One of the conditions for reliable and accurate results in this part is acquiring USimages without artifacts due to breathing motion. For interfractional corrections, this can be realized by imaging during breath hold. In order to track intrafractional tumor and organ motion, including breathing induced, we are moving towards acquisition of temporal 3D image series. As an interim step, we discuss acquisition of temporal 2D datasets. As opposed to prostate, where the US probe can be placed on the perineum during treatment to avoid interaction with the radiation beam, the probe positions required for liver are more complex. Therefore, we are developing robot‐ assisted positioning of the probe. Not all Abdominal lesions are clearly visible on USimages. By introducing CEUS, more tumors will have increased contrast allowing tracking them. With real‐time tumor tracking it is impossible to manually delineate structures. Therefore auto‐contouring algorithms for this specific application are under investigation. Conclusion: By combining all the investigated technologies we aim to develop a reliable real‐time volumetric soft‐tissue USimage‐guidance system for clinical implementation. Research sponsored by ElektaLearning Objectives:1‐ understand the challenges of in‐vivo real time motion monitoring2‐ understand the role of ultrasound imaging in in‐vivo real time motion monitoring3‐learn about our efforts to develop a system for ultrasound‐ based in‐vivo real time motion monitoring

  • we a bra 03 towards real time ultrasound image guided Abdominal Radiotherapy
    Medical Physics, 2012
    Co-Authors: S Van Der Meer, John Wong, E Bloemen, Davide Fontanarosa, M Lachaine, Frank Verhaegen

    Abstract:

    Purpose: Accurate tumor positioning in stereotactic body Radiotherapy of Abdominal lesions is often hampered by organ motion and set‐up errors. The problems of the daily variation (interfractional motion) in tumor position can be partially corrected with on‐line soft‐tissue image‐guidedRadiotherapy. However, a greater challenge is to also capture the movement during treatment (intrafractional motion). Methods: To study the feasibility of Abdominal real‐time volumetric soft‐tissue image‐guidance with ultrasound(US)imaging, we are investigating several aspects each with their own challenges: 3DUS volumetric imaging, 2DUS time series of the organ motion, roboticUS probe placement, US auto‐contouring and contrast enhanced US (CEUS). Results: Currently, 3DUS imaging is used first to correct for the set‐up errors as well as interfractional organ motion. One of the conditions for reliable and accurate results in this part is acquiring USimages without artifacts due to breathing motion. For interfractional corrections, this can be realized by imaging during breath hold. In order to track intrafractional tumor and organ motion, including breathing induced, we are moving towards acquisition of temporal 3D image series. As an interim step, we discuss acquisition of temporal 2D datasets. As opposed to prostate, where the US probe can be placed on the perineum during treatment to avoid interaction with the radiation beam, the probe positions required for liver are more complex. Therefore, we are developing robot‐ assisted positioning of the probe. Not all Abdominal lesions are clearly visible on USimages. By introducing CEUS, more tumors will have increased contrast allowing tracking them. With real‐time tumor tracking it is impossible to manually delineate structures. Therefore auto‐contouring algorithms for this specific application are under investigation. Conclusion: By combining all the investigated technologies we aim to develop a reliable real‐time volumetric soft‐tissue USimage‐guidance system for clinical implementation. Research sponsored by ElektaLearning Objectives:1‐ understand the challenges of in‐vivo real time motion monitoring2‐ understand the role of ultrasound imaging in in‐vivo real time motion monitoring3‐learn about our efforts to develop a system for ultrasound‐ based in‐vivo real time motion monitoring

  • we a bra 03 towards real time ultrasound image guided Abdominal Radiotherapy
    Faculty of Health, 2012
    Co-Authors: S Van Der Meer, John Wong, E Bloemen, Davide Fontanarosa, M Lachaine, Frank Verhaegen

    Abstract:

    Accurate tumor positioning in stereotactic body Radiotherapy of Abdominal lesions is often hampered by organ motion and set-up errors. The problems of the daily variation (interfractional motion) in tumor position can be partially corrected with on-line soft-tissue image-guided Radiotherapy. However, a greater challenge is to also capture the movement during treatment (intrafractional motion).

J Debus – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • intensity modulated whole Abdominal Radiotherapy after surgery and carboplatin taxane chemotherapy for advanced ovarian cancer phase i study
    International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, 2010
    Co-Authors: N Rochet, Florian Sterzing, Alexandra D Jensen, J Dinkel, Klaus Herfarth, Kai Schubert, Michael H R Eichbaum, Andreas Schneeweiss, Christof Sohn, J Debus

    Abstract:

    Purpose To assess the feasibility and toxicity of consolidative intensity-modulated whole Abdominal Radiotherapy (WAR) after surgery and chemotherapy in high-risk patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Methods and Materials Ten patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIIc were treated in a Phase I study with intensity-modulated WAR up to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions as consolidation therapy after adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy. Treatment was delivered using intensity-modulated Radiotherapy in a step-and-shoot technique ( n = 3) or a helical tomotherapy technique ( n = 7). The planning target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity and the pelvic and para-aortal node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, vertebral bodies, and pelvic bones. Results Intensity-modulated WAR resulted in an excellent coverage of the planning target volume and an effective sparing of the organs at risk. The treatment was well tolerated, and no severe Grade 4 acute side effects occurred. Common Toxicity Criteria Grade III toxicities were as follows: diarrhea ( n = 1), thrombocytopenia ( n = 1), and leukopenia ( n = 3). Radiotherapy could be completed by all the patients without any toxicity-related interruption. Median follow-up was 23 months, and 4 patients had tumor recurrence (intraperitoneal progression, n = 3; hepatic metastasis, n = 1). Small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions occurred in 3 patients. Conclusions The results of this Phase I study showed for the first time, to our knowledge, the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated whole Abdominal Radiotherapy, which could offer a new therapeutic option for consolidation treatment of advanced ovarian carcinoma after adjuvant chemotherapy in selected subgroups of patients. We initiated a Phase II study to further evaluate the toxicity of this intensive multimodal treatment.

  • Intensity-Modulated Whole Abdominal Radiotherapy After Surgery and Carboplatin/Taxane Chemotherapy for Advanced Ovarian Cancer: Phase I Study
    International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, 2009
    Co-Authors: N Rochet, Florian Sterzing, Alexandra D Jensen, J Dinkel, Klaus Herfarth, Kai Schubert, Michael H R Eichbaum, Andreas Schneeweiss, Christof Sohn, J Debus

    Abstract:

    Purpose To assess the feasibility and toxicity of consolidative intensity-modulated whole Abdominal Radiotherapy (WAR) after surgery and chemotherapy in high-risk patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Methods and Materials Ten patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIIc were treated in a Phase I study with intensity-modulated WAR up to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions as consolidation therapy after adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy. Treatment was delivered using intensity-modulated Radiotherapy in a step-and-shoot technique ( n = 3) or a helical tomotherapy technique ( n = 7). The planning target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity and the pelvic and para-aortal node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, vertebral bodies, and pelvic bones. Results Intensity-modulated WAR resulted in an excellent coverage of the planning target volume and an effective sparing of the organs at risk. The treatment was well tolerated, and no severe Grade 4 acute side effects occurred. Common Toxicity Criteria Grade III toxicities were as follows: diarrhea ( n = 1), thrombocytopenia ( n = 1), and leukopenia ( n = 3). Radiotherapy could be completed by all the patients without any toxicity-related interruption. Median follow-up was 23 months, and 4 patients had tumor recurrence (intraperitoneal progression, n = 3; hepatic metastasis, n = 1). Small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions occurred in 3 patients. Conclusions The results of this Phase I study showed for the first time, to our knowledge, the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated whole Abdominal Radiotherapy, which could offer a new therapeutic option for consolidation treatment of advanced ovarian carcinoma after adjuvant chemotherapy in selected subgroups of patients. We initiated a Phase II study to further evaluate the toxicity of this intensive multimodal treatment.

S Van Der Meer – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • WE‐A‐BRA‐03: Towards Real‐Time Ultrasound Image‐Guided Abdominal Radiotherapy
    Medical Physics, 2012
    Co-Authors: S Van Der Meer, John Wong, E Bloemen, Davide Fontanarosa, M Lachaine, Frank Verhaegen

    Abstract:

    Purpose: Accurate tumor positioning in stereotactic body Radiotherapy of Abdominal lesions is often hampered by organ motion and set‐up errors. The problems of the daily variation (interfractional motion) in tumor position can be partially corrected with on‐line soft‐tissue image‐guidedRadiotherapy. However, a greater challenge is to also capture the movement during treatment (intrafractional motion). Methods: To study the feasibility of Abdominal real‐time volumetric soft‐tissue image‐guidance with ultrasound(US)imaging, we are investigating several aspects each with their own challenges: 3DUS volumetric imaging, 2DUS time series of the organ motion, roboticUS probe placement, US auto‐contouring and contrast enhanced US (CEUS). Results: Currently, 3DUS imaging is used first to correct for the set‐up errors as well as interfractional organ motion. One of the conditions for reliable and accurate results in this part is acquiring USimages without artifacts due to breathing motion. For interfractional corrections, this can be realized by imaging during breath hold. In order to track intrafractional tumor and organ motion, including breathing induced, we are moving towards acquisition of temporal 3D image series. As an interim step, we discuss acquisition of temporal 2D datasets. As opposed to prostate, where the US probe can be placed on the perineum during treatment to avoid interaction with the radiation beam, the probe positions required for liver are more complex. Therefore, we are developing robot‐ assisted positioning of the probe. Not all Abdominal lesions are clearly visible on USimages. By introducing CEUS, more tumors will have increased contrast allowing tracking them. With real‐time tumor tracking it is impossible to manually delineate structures. Therefore auto‐contouring algorithms for this specific application are under investigation. Conclusion: By combining all the investigated technologies we aim to develop a reliable real‐time volumetric soft‐tissue USimage‐guidance system for clinical implementation. Research sponsored by ElektaLearning Objectives:1‐ understand the challenges of in‐vivo real time motion monitoring2‐ understand the role of ultrasound imaging in in‐vivo real time motion monitoring3‐learn about our efforts to develop a system for ultrasound‐ based in‐vivo real time motion monitoring

  • we a bra 03 towards real time ultrasound image guided Abdominal Radiotherapy
    Medical Physics, 2012
    Co-Authors: S Van Der Meer, John Wong, E Bloemen, Davide Fontanarosa, M Lachaine, Frank Verhaegen

    Abstract:

    Purpose: Accurate tumor positioning in stereotactic body Radiotherapy of Abdominal lesions is often hampered by organ motion and set‐up errors. The problems of the daily variation (interfractional motion) in tumor position can be partially corrected with on‐line soft‐tissue image‐guidedRadiotherapy. However, a greater challenge is to also capture the movement during treatment (intrafractional motion). Methods: To study the feasibility of Abdominal real‐time volumetric soft‐tissue image‐guidance with ultrasound(US)imaging, we are investigating several aspects each with their own challenges: 3DUS volumetric imaging, 2DUS time series of the organ motion, roboticUS probe placement, US auto‐contouring and contrast enhanced US (CEUS). Results: Currently, 3DUS imaging is used first to correct for the set‐up errors as well as interfractional organ motion. One of the conditions for reliable and accurate results in this part is acquiring USimages without artifacts due to breathing motion. For interfractional corrections, this can be realized by imaging during breath hold. In order to track intrafractional tumor and organ motion, including breathing induced, we are moving towards acquisition of temporal 3D image series. As an interim step, we discuss acquisition of temporal 2D datasets. As opposed to prostate, where the US probe can be placed on the perineum during treatment to avoid interaction with the radiation beam, the probe positions required for liver are more complex. Therefore, we are developing robot‐ assisted positioning of the probe. Not all Abdominal lesions are clearly visible on USimages. By introducing CEUS, more tumors will have increased contrast allowing tracking them. With real‐time tumor tracking it is impossible to manually delineate structures. Therefore auto‐contouring algorithms for this specific application are under investigation. Conclusion: By combining all the investigated technologies we aim to develop a reliable real‐time volumetric soft‐tissue USimage‐guidance system for clinical implementation. Research sponsored by ElektaLearning Objectives:1‐ understand the challenges of in‐vivo real time motion monitoring2‐ understand the role of ultrasound imaging in in‐vivo real time motion monitoring3‐learn about our efforts to develop a system for ultrasound‐ based in‐vivo real time motion monitoring

  • we a bra 03 towards real time ultrasound image guided Abdominal Radiotherapy
    Faculty of Health, 2012
    Co-Authors: S Van Der Meer, John Wong, E Bloemen, Davide Fontanarosa, M Lachaine, Frank Verhaegen

    Abstract:

    Accurate tumor positioning in stereotactic body Radiotherapy of Abdominal lesions is often hampered by organ motion and set-up errors. The problems of the daily variation (interfractional motion) in tumor position can be partially corrected with on-line soft-tissue image-guided Radiotherapy. However, a greater challenge is to also capture the movement during treatment (intrafractional motion).