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Abdominal X-Ray

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G. M. A. Hendry – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Initial investigation of childhood urinary tract infection: does the plain Abdominal X ray still have a role?
    The British journal of radiology, 1991
    Co-Authors: Ian J. Kenney, R. J. Arthur, L. E. Sweeney, G. M. A. Hendry
    Abstract:

    Abstract To reassess the plain Abdominal X ray (AXR) in the initial investigation of childhood urinary tract infection, radiologists from four paediatric units prospectively collected data on the yield from the AXR in 683 children. Five children had renal calculi. All were detected on ultrasound, but one was not visible on the initial AXR. Four spinal abnormalities were identified, none of which prompted any action by the clinician involved. While the costs, in both financial and radiation risk terms, may be small, the benefit of the AXR appears equally small. Where expert paediatric ultrasonography is available we would recommend that the AXR be reserved for patients with haematuria, loin pain, family history of calculus disease, or where further urinary tract infection occurs despite a normal ultrasound scan.

Ian J. Kenney – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Initial investigation of childhood urinary tract infection: does the plain Abdominal X ray still have a role?
    The British journal of radiology, 1991
    Co-Authors: Ian J. Kenney, R. J. Arthur, L. E. Sweeney, G. M. A. Hendry
    Abstract:

    Abstract To reassess the plain Abdominal X ray (AXR) in the initial investigation of childhood urinary tract infection, radiologists from four paediatric units prospectively collected data on the yield from the AXR in 683 children. Five children had renal calculi. All were detected on ultrasound, but one was not visible on the initial AXR. Four spinal abnormalities were identified, none of which prompted any action by the clinician involved. While the costs, in both financial and radiation risk terms, may be small, the benefit of the AXR appears equally small. Where expert paediatric ultrasonography is available we would recommend that the AXR be reserved for patients with haematuria, loin pain, family history of calculus disease, or where further urinary tract infection occurs despite a normal ultrasound scan.

Stephen Y Nakada – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • role of residual fragments on the risk of repeat surgery after flexible ureteroscopy and laser lithotripsy single center study
    The Journal of Urology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Viacheslav Iremashvili, Kristina L Penniston, Sara L Best, Sean P Hedican, Stephen Y Nakada
    Abstract:

    Purpose:We analyzed the impact of residual stone fragments seen on Abdominal X-Ray after ureteroscopy and laser lithotripsy on the risk of repeat surgical intervention.Materials and Methods:Our study included 781 patients (802 renal units) who underwent ureteroscopy and laser lithotripsy with Abdominal X-Ray within 3 months postoperatively and who had at least 1 year of followup. Ureteroscopy and laser lithotripsy were performed using the dusting technique. We analyzed the association between surgical recurrence-free survival and the size of the largest residual fragment.Results:During a median followup of 4.2 years repeat surgery was performed on 161 renal units (20%). Of the repeat interventions 75% were done for symptomatic nephrolithiasis. Postoperative imaging showed residual stone fragments in 42% of cases. In the entire group the risk of repeat surgery was increased in renal units with residual fragments greater than 2 mm. The effect of the size of residual fragments on the risk of surgical recurre…