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Aberrant Behavior Checklist

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Michael G Aman – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Factor Structure of the Aberrant Behavior Checklist in Individuals with Fragile X Syndrome: Clarifications and Future Guidance
    Journal of child and adolescent psychopharmacology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Michael G Aman, Anne C. Wheeler, Carla M. Bann, Aaron J Kaat, Megan Norris, Howard Andrews, Tse Hwei Choo, Chen Chen, Craig A. Erickson
    Abstract:

    Objective: The Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC) is a standardized rating scale used for assessing problematic Behavior of individuals with developmental disabilities. It has five subscales: Irritability, Social Withdrawal, Stereotypic Behavior, Hyperactivity, and Inappropriate Speech. A previous study in individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS) reported six factors, with the Social Withdrawal factor bifurcating into Socially Unresponsive and Social Avoidance factors, suggesting a different factor structure in people with FXS. Methods: We assessed the ABC’s factor structure (with both exploratory and confirmatory analyses) in 797 people with FXS and we compared these findings with exploratory factors derived from an independent sample of 357 individuals with FXS. In an ancillary analysis, we compared the overlap of the traditional ABC’s Social Withdrawal scores with the Social Avoidance scores from the FXS-derived newer scale to determine whether overlap between these was very high and essentially redundant. Finally, we computed norms using both the traditional and the FXS-specific algorithms. Results: In confirmatory factor analyses, the FXS-specific algorithm produced the most consistent factor structure for the sample of 797 participants, but model fit was only marginally better than that derived by the original ABC scoring algorithm. Comparisons of factor structures from separate exploratory analyses revealed no consistent advantage of the FXS algorithm over the traditional algorithm. While a Social Avoidance subscale did emerge in some analyses, in other analyses, this was accompanied by loss of coherence on other domains of interest, such as the Socially Unresponsive/Social Withdrawal subscale. Conclusion: We question whether the newer FXS scoring algorithm contributes data that are consistently helpful in evaluating Behavior of people with FXS. In general, we recommend continued use of the original ABC algorithm for scoring Behavior of clients with FXS. However, we acknowledge that there may be circumscribed times when the new algorithm may be appropriate for scoring, namely when anxiety and/or social avoidance constructs are the central and unequivocal domains of interest.

  • Psychometric Properties of the Norwegian Aberrant Behavior Checklist and Diagnostic Relationships in a Neuro-pediatric Sample
    Journal of Mental Health Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 2019
    Co-Authors: Marianne Halvorsen, Michael G Aman, Børge Mathiassen, Per Håkan Brøndbo, Oddmar Ole Steinsvik, Monica Martinussen
    Abstract:

    Introduction: Although the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC) is one of the most widely used Behavioral rating scales among people with developmental disabilities, very few studies have examined the…

  • Psychometric characteristics of the Aberrant Behavior Checklist in a well-defined sample of youth with autism Spectrum disorder
    Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 2019
    Co-Authors: Megan Norris, Michael G Aman, Micah O. Mazurek, Jessica F. Scherr, Eric Butter
    Abstract:

    Abstract Background Behavior and emotional difficulties often occur in children and adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), yet there are few instruments available to assess such problems in this population. The Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC), one option for this, is widely used and has substantial psychometric support. Despite this, only two studies to date have examined its structural validity in samples of individuals diagnosed exclusively with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This study sought to further examine the ABC’s validity for use with children and adolescents with ASD. Method Data from 470 individuals aged 2–14 years were submitted to confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Correlations with other measures were examined. MANOVA was conducted to examine effects of subject characteristics on subscale scores of the ABC and assist in developing norms. Results Results supported the original factor structure of the ABC. Convergent and divergent validity analyses indicated correspondence with analogous measures and lack of relationship for dissimilar constructs. Results of normative analyses were very comparable to the only previously published norms for youth with ASD. Conclusions Overall, results provide further psychometric support for use of the ABC in individuals with ASD and better understanding the ABC’s clinical usefulness, particularly given the similarity between current and previous normative data. In a broader context, these results lend further support to the ABC as an instrument with wide applications.

Craig A. Erickson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Factor Structure of the Aberrant Behavior Checklist in Individuals with Fragile X Syndrome: Clarifications and Future Guidance
    Journal of child and adolescent psychopharmacology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Michael G Aman, Anne C. Wheeler, Carla M. Bann, Aaron J Kaat, Megan Norris, Howard Andrews, Tse Hwei Choo, Chen Chen, Craig A. Erickson
    Abstract:

    Objective: The Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC) is a standardized rating scale used for assessing problematic Behavior of individuals with developmental disabilities. It has five subscales: Irritability, Social Withdrawal, Stereotypic Behavior, Hyperactivity, and Inappropriate Speech. A previous study in individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS) reported six factors, with the Social Withdrawal factor bifurcating into Socially Unresponsive and Social Avoidance factors, suggesting a different factor structure in people with FXS. Methods: We assessed the ABC’s factor structure (with both exploratory and confirmatory analyses) in 797 people with FXS and we compared these findings with exploratory factors derived from an independent sample of 357 individuals with FXS. In an ancillary analysis, we compared the overlap of the traditional ABC’s Social Withdrawal scores with the Social Avoidance scores from the FXS-derived newer scale to determine whether overlap between these was very high and essentially redundant. Finally, we computed norms using both the traditional and the FXS-specific algorithms. Results: In confirmatory factor analyses, the FXS-specific algorithm produced the most consistent factor structure for the sample of 797 participants, but model fit was only marginally better than that derived by the original ABC scoring algorithm. Comparisons of factor structures from separate exploratory analyses revealed no consistent advantage of the FXS algorithm over the traditional algorithm. While a Social Avoidance subscale did emerge in some analyses, in other analyses, this was accompanied by loss of coherence on other domains of interest, such as the Socially Unresponsive/Social Withdrawal subscale. Conclusion: We question whether the newer FXS scoring algorithm contributes data that are consistently helpful in evaluating Behavior of people with FXS. In general, we recommend continued use of the original ABC algorithm for scoring Behavior of clients with FXS. However, we acknowledge that there may be circumscribed times when the new algorithm may be appropriate for scoring, namely when anxiety and/or social avoidance constructs are the central and unequivocal domains of interest.

  • Brief Report: Intranasal Ketamine in Adolescents and Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder—Initial Results of a Randomized, Controlled, Crossover, Pilot Study
    Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 2020
    Co-Authors: Logan K. Wink, Debra L. Reisinger, Paul Horn, Rebecca C. Shaffer, Kaela O’brien, Lauren Schmitt, Kelli R. Dominick, Ernest V. Pedapati, Craig A. Erickson
    Abstract:

    Dysregulation of glutamate neurotransmission plays a critical role in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) pathophysiology and is a primary target for core deficit research treatment trials. The mechanism of action of ketamine has striking overlap with the theory of ASD as a disorder of synaptic communication and neuronal networks. This two-dose, double-blind, placebo controlled, cross-over pilot trial of intranasal (IN) ketamine targeting core social impairment included individuals with ASD ( N  = 21) between 14 and 29 years. Participants were randomized to received two doses of IN ketamine (30 and 50 mg) and two doses of matching placebo. No significant impact was noted on the Aberrant Behavior Checklist Social Withdraw subscale. The IN ketamine was well tolerated, with only transient mild adverse effects.

  • Brief Report: Intranasal Ketamine in Adolescents and Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder-Initial Results of a Randomized, Controlled, Crossover, Pilot Study.
    Journal of autism and developmental disorders, 2020
    Co-Authors: Logan K. Wink, Debra L. Reisinger, Rebecca C. Shaffer, Kaela O’brien, Kelli R. Dominick, Ernest V. Pedapati, Paul S. Horn, Lauren M. Schmitt, Craig A. Erickson
    Abstract:

    Dysregulation of glutamate neurotransmission plays a critical role in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) pathophysiology and is a primary target for core deficit research treatment trials. The mechanism of action of ketamine has striking overlap with the theory of ASD as a disorder of synaptic communication and neuronal networks. This two-dose, double-blind, placebo controlled, cross-over pilot trial of intranasal (IN) ketamine targeting core social impairment included individuals with ASD (N = 21) between 14 and 29 years. Participants were randomized to received two doses of IN ketamine (30 and 50 mg) and two doses of matching placebo. No significant impact was noted on the Aberrant Behavior Checklist Social Withdraw subscale. The IN ketamine was well tolerated, with only transient mild adverse effects.

Lawrence Scahill – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A Feasibility Randomized Clinical Trial of a Structured Function-Based Intervention for Elopement in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
    Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 2020
    Co-Authors: Mindy Scheithauer, Nathan A. Call, Joanna Lomas Mevers, Courtney E. Mccracken, Lawrence Scahill
    Abstract:

    Elopement is a common and dangerous concern in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). There is evidence that Behavior analytic treatments can successfully treat elopement, but the research is limited due to small samples and treatment components varying across studies. The current study evaluated the feasibility of studying a manualized intervention for elopement, based on strategies from single-subject research, in a randomized clinical trial with 24 individuals with ASD. Results demonstrated that recruitment was feasible; the manual was acceptable to parents; and therapists followed the manual with high-integrity. Initial efficacy results measured by the Aberrant Behavior Checklist, Clinical Global Impression Scale, and a Home Elopement Safety Checklist suggested improvement in the treatment group that should be studied in future research.

  • a pilot study of parent training in young children with autism spectrum disorders and disruptive Behavior
    Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 2013
    Co-Authors: Karen Bearss, Cynthia R. Johnson, Benjamin L Handen, Tristram Smith, Lawrence Scahill
    Abstract:

    Guidance on effective interventions for disruptive Behavior in young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is limited. We present feasibility and initial efficacy data on a structured parent training program for 16 children (ages 3–6) with ASD and disruptive Behavior. The 6-month intervention included 11 Core and up to 2 Optional sessions. The program was acceptable to parents as evidenced by an attendance rate of 84 % for Core sessions. Fourteen of 16 families completed the treatment. An independent clinician rated 14 of 16 subjects as much improved or very much improved at Week 24. Using last observation carried forward, the parent-rated Aberrant Behavior Checklist-Irritability subscale decreased 54 % from 16.00 (SD = 9.21) to 7.38 (SD = 6.15).

  • brief report social disability in autism spectrum disorder results from research units on pediatric psychopharmacology rupp autism network trials
    Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 2013
    Co-Authors: Lawrence Scahill, Victoria Hallett, Michael G Aman, Christopher J Mcdougle, Eugene L Arnold, James T Mccracken, Elaine Tierney
    Abstract:

    There is growing interest in measuring social disability as a core element of autism spectrum disorders in medication trials. We conducted a secondary analysis on the Aberrant Behavior Checklist Social Withdrawal subscale using data from two federally-funded, multi-site, randomized trials with risperidone. Study 1 included 52 subjects assigned to placebo and 49 subjects to risperidone under double-blind conditions. Study 2 included 49 subjects assigned to risperidone only and 75 subjects assigned to risperidone plus parent training. After 8 weeks of treatment, all active treatments were superior to placebo (effect sizes ranging from 0.42 to 0.65). The findings suggest that the Social Withdrawal subscale may be a useful measure of social disability in acute treatment trials.

Jing Liu – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Reliability and Validity of the Simplified Chinese Version of the Aberrant Behavior Checklist in Chinese Autism Population.
    Frontiers in psychiatry, 2020
    Co-Authors: Siuching Kat, Yanqing Guo, Xinzhou Tang, Yulu Yang, Hui Wang, Jing Liu
    Abstract:

    Background: The Aberrant Behavior Checklist is a widely used scale in autism clinical intervention research for the assessment of core symptoms and comorbid emotional and Behavioral problems among people with autism. The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Simplified Chinese version of Aberrant Behavior Checklist (SC-ABC) using a sample of people with autism in Chinese population. Methods: In total, we enrolled 799 patients aged 1.5-33 years old. We collected data using the SC-ABC (n=799), Autism Behavior Checklist (n=743), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Rating Scale-IV (n=433) and Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist (n=319). Eighty-four patients were separately assessed with the SC-ABC by two caregivers simultaneously. Forty-four patients were assessed with the SC-ABC again by same caregiver two weeks after the first assessment. SC-ABC data from the whole sample were used for confirmatory factor analysis. We evaluated criterion validity using Spearman’s correlation coefficient between scores of the SC-ABC and scores of the Autism Behavior Checklist, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Rating Scale-IV and Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist separately in the whole sample and different age groups. We calculated the intragroup correlation coefficients and Spearman’s correlation coefficient for interrater reliability in 84 samples and test-retest reliability in 44 samples. We conducted Cronbach’s α for internal consistency. Results: For the SC-ABC, the intragroup correlation coefficients of five subscales and the total score in interrater and test-retest reliability ranged from 0.87 to 0.92 and from 0.93 to 0.97 (all P<0.01). The Spearman’s correlation coefficient of five subscales and the total score in interrater and test-retest reliability ranged from 0.78 to 0.85 and 0.86 to 0.94, respectively (all P<0.01). Cronbach’s α of five subscales and the total score ranged from 0.75 to 0.96 (all P<0.01). The Spearman’s correlation coefficient for criterion validity for the whole sample and different age groups ranged from 0.39 to 0.76 (all P<0.01). The model fit for the original five factor model was acceptable, with fit indices of SMR=0.062 and RMSEA=0.052. Conclusions: The SC-ABC has satisfactory psychometric properties and can be used in the assessment of core symptoms and comorbid emotional and Behavioral problems in patients with autism.

  • reliability and validity of the simplified chinese version of the Aberrant Behavior Checklist in chinese autism population
    Frontiers in Psychiatry, 2020
    Co-Authors: Siuching Kat, Yanqing Guo, Xinzhou Tang, Yulu Yang, Hui Wang, Jing Liu
    Abstract:

    Background: The Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC) is a widely used scale in autism clinical intervention research for the assessment of core symptoms and comorbid emotional and Behavioral problems among people with autism. The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Simplified Chinese version of the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (SC-ABC) using a sample of people with autism in a Chinese population. Methods: In total, we enrolled 799 patients aged 1.5-33 years old. We collected data using the SC-ABC (n = 799), Autism Behavior Checklist (n = 743), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Rating Scale-IV (ADHD-RS-IV) (n = 433) and Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) (n = 319). Eighty-four patients were separately assessed with the SC-ABC by two caregivers simultaneously. Forty-four patients were assessed with the SC-ABC again by same caregiver 2 weeks after the first assessment. SC-ABC data from the whole sample were used for confirmatory factor analysis. We evaluated criterion validity using Spearman’s correlation coefficient between scores of the SC-ABC and scores of the Autism Behavior Checklist, ADHD-RS-IV and CBCL separately in the whole sample and different age groups. We calculated the intragroup correlation coefficients and Spearman’s correlation coefficient for interrater reliability in 84 samples and test-retest reliability in 44 samples. We conducted Cronbach’s α for internal consistency. Results: For the SC-ABC, the intragroup correlation coefficients of five subscales and the total score in interrater and test-retest reliability ranged from 0.87 to 0.92 and from 0.93 to 0.97 (all P < 0.01). The Spearman's correlation coefficient of five subscales and the total score in interrater and test-retest reliability ranged from 0.78 to 0.85 and 0.86 to 0.94, respectively (all P < 0.01). Cronbach's α of five subscales and the total score ranged from 0.75 to 0.96 (all P < 0.01). The Spearman's correlation coefficient for criterion validity for the whole sample and different age groups ranged from 0.39 to 0.76 (all P < 0.01). The model fit for the original five factor model was acceptable, with fit indices of SMR = 0.062 and RMSEA = 0.052. Conclusions: The SC-ABC has satisfactory psychometric properties and can be used in the assessment of core symptoms and comorbid emotional and Behavioral problems in patients with autism.

Logan K. Wink – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Brief Report: Intranasal Ketamine in Adolescents and Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder—Initial Results of a Randomized, Controlled, Crossover, Pilot Study
    Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 2020
    Co-Authors: Logan K. Wink, Debra L. Reisinger, Paul Horn, Rebecca C. Shaffer, Kaela O’brien, Lauren Schmitt, Kelli R. Dominick, Ernest V. Pedapati, Craig A. Erickson
    Abstract:

    Dysregulation of glutamate neurotransmission plays a critical role in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) pathophysiology and is a primary target for core deficit research treatment trials. The mechanism of action of ketamine has striking overlap with the theory of ASD as a disorder of synaptic communication and neuronal networks. This two-dose, double-blind, placebo controlled, cross-over pilot trial of intranasal (IN) ketamine targeting core social impairment included individuals with ASD ( N  = 21) between 14 and 29 years. Participants were randomized to received two doses of IN ketamine (30 and 50 mg) and two doses of matching placebo. No significant impact was noted on the Aberrant Behavior Checklist Social Withdraw subscale. The IN ketamine was well tolerated, with only transient mild adverse effects.

  • Brief Report: Intranasal Ketamine in Adolescents and Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder-Initial Results of a Randomized, Controlled, Crossover, Pilot Study.
    Journal of autism and developmental disorders, 2020
    Co-Authors: Logan K. Wink, Debra L. Reisinger, Rebecca C. Shaffer, Kaela O’brien, Kelli R. Dominick, Ernest V. Pedapati, Paul S. Horn, Lauren M. Schmitt, Craig A. Erickson
    Abstract:

    Dysregulation of glutamate neurotransmission plays a critical role in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) pathophysiology and is a primary target for core deficit research treatment trials. The mechanism of action of ketamine has striking overlap with the theory of ASD as a disorder of synaptic communication and neuronal networks. This two-dose, double-blind, placebo controlled, cross-over pilot trial of intranasal (IN) ketamine targeting core social impairment included individuals with ASD (N = 21) between 14 and 29 years. Participants were randomized to received two doses of IN ketamine (30 and 50 mg) and two doses of matching placebo. No significant impact was noted on the Aberrant Behavior Checklist Social Withdraw subscale. The IN ketamine was well tolerated, with only transient mild adverse effects.