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Abnormal Thinking

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G. Tollefson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The central cholinergic system profile of olanzapine compared with placebo in Alzheimer’s disease.
    International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2001
    Co-Authors: John S. Kennedy, A. Zagar, Franklin Porter Bymaster, George G. Nomikos, P. T. Trzepacz, J.a. Gilmore, M. D. Rotelli, Alan Breier, G. Tollefson

    Abstract:

    Objective

    The objective of this analysis was to compare the treatment-emergent central anticholinergic-like adverse events experienced during treatment with olanzapine versus placebo in patients with psychosis and/or agitation due to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In addition, changes in cognition were assessed in a subgroup of patients with mild to moderate cognitive impairment.

    Methods

    Double-blind data were compared for placebo and three fixed olanzapine dosages (5 mg/day, 10 mg/day, and 15 mg/day) in 206 nursing home-residing patients with AD for five a priori selected central nervous system anticholinergic-like adverse events: confusion, delirium, delusions, hallucinations, Abnormal Thinking. Mean change from baseline to endpoint on the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale—Cognitive (ADAS-Cog) was measured for a subgroup of 43 patients who had mild to moderate cognitive impairment at baseline.

    Results

    There were no significant differences in central anticholinergic-like adverse events at any olanzapine dose compared to placebo. Additionally, in the 43-patient subgroup, there were no significant differences in mean change in ADAS-Cog scores between placebo and the three olanzapine dose subgroups.

    Conclusion

    Olanzapine did not differ significantly from placebo for any of the five central nervous system anticholinergic events nor on the ADAS-Cog. Olanzapine’s initially reported potent in vitro muscarinic receptor affinity is not consistent with this clinical study of central nervous system anticholinergic-like adverse events in patients with AD. Copyright © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • The central cholinergic system profile of olanzapine compared with placebo in Alzheimer’s disease.
    International journal of geriatric psychiatry, 2001
    Co-Authors: John S. Kennedy, A. Zagar, Franklin Porter Bymaster, George G. Nomikos, P. T. Trzepacz, J.a. Gilmore, M. D. Rotelli, Alan Breier, G. Tollefson

    Abstract:

    The objective of this analysis was to compare the treatment-emergent central anticholinergic-like adverse events experienced during treatment with olanzapine versus placebo in patients with psychosis and/or agitation due to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In addition, changes in cognition were assessed in a subgroup of patients with mild to moderate cognitive impairment.
    Double-blind data were compared for placebo and three fixed olanzapine dosages (5 mg/day, 10 mg/day, and 15 mg/day) in 206 nursing home-residing patients with AD for five a priori selected central nervous system anticholinergic-like adverse events: confusion, delirium, delusions, hallucinations, Abnormal Thinking. Mean change from baseline to endpoint on the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive (ADAS-Cog) was measured for a subgroup of 43 patients who had mild to moderate cognitive impairment at baseline.
    There were no significant differences in central anticholinergic-like adverse events at any olanzapine dose compared to placebo. Additionally, in the 43-patient subgroup, there were no significant differences in mean change in ADAS-Cog scores between placebo and the three olanzapine dose subgroups.
    Olanzapine did not differ significantly from placebo for any of the five central nervous system anticholinergic events nor on the ADAS-Cog. Olanzapine’s initially reported potent in vitro muscarinic receptor affinity is not consistent with this clinical study of central nervous system anticholinergic-like adverse events in patients with AD.
    Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

John S. Kennedy – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The central cholinergic system profile of olanzapine compared with placebo in Alzheimer’s disease.
    International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2001
    Co-Authors: John S. Kennedy, A. Zagar, Franklin Porter Bymaster, George G. Nomikos, P. T. Trzepacz, J.a. Gilmore, M. D. Rotelli, Alan Breier, G. Tollefson

    Abstract:

    Objective

    The objective of this analysis was to compare the treatment-emergent central anticholinergic-like adverse events experienced during treatment with olanzapine versus placebo in patients with psychosis and/or agitation due to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In addition, changes in cognition were assessed in a subgroup of patients with mild to moderate cognitive impairment.

    Methods

    Double-blind data were compared for placebo and three fixed olanzapine dosages (5 mg/day, 10 mg/day, and 15 mg/day) in 206 nursing home-residing patients with AD for five a priori selected central nervous system anticholinergic-like adverse events: confusion, delirium, delusions, hallucinations, Abnormal Thinking. Mean change from baseline to endpoint on the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale—Cognitive (ADAS-Cog) was measured for a subgroup of 43 patients who had mild to moderate cognitive impairment at baseline.

    Results

    There were no significant differences in central anticholinergic-like adverse events at any olanzapine dose compared to placebo. Additionally, in the 43-patient subgroup, there were no significant differences in mean change in ADAS-Cog scores between placebo and the three olanzapine dose subgroups.

    Conclusion

    Olanzapine did not differ significantly from placebo for any of the five central nervous system anticholinergic events nor on the ADAS-Cog. Olanzapine’s initially reported potent in vitro muscarinic receptor affinity is not consistent with this clinical study of central nervous system anticholinergic-like adverse events in patients with AD. Copyright © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • The central cholinergic system profile of olanzapine compared with placebo in Alzheimer’s disease.
    International journal of geriatric psychiatry, 2001
    Co-Authors: John S. Kennedy, A. Zagar, Franklin Porter Bymaster, George G. Nomikos, P. T. Trzepacz, J.a. Gilmore, M. D. Rotelli, Alan Breier, G. Tollefson

    Abstract:

    The objective of this analysis was to compare the treatment-emergent central anticholinergic-like adverse events experienced during treatment with olanzapine versus placebo in patients with psychosis and/or agitation due to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In addition, changes in cognition were assessed in a subgroup of patients with mild to moderate cognitive impairment.
    Double-blind data were compared for placebo and three fixed olanzapine dosages (5 mg/day, 10 mg/day, and 15 mg/day) in 206 nursing home-residing patients with AD for five a priori selected central nervous system anticholinergic-like adverse events: confusion, delirium, delusions, hallucinations, Abnormal Thinking. Mean change from baseline to endpoint on the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive (ADAS-Cog) was measured for a subgroup of 43 patients who had mild to moderate cognitive impairment at baseline.
    There were no significant differences in central anticholinergic-like adverse events at any olanzapine dose compared to placebo. Additionally, in the 43-patient subgroup, there were no significant differences in mean change in ADAS-Cog scores between placebo and the three olanzapine dose subgroups.
    Olanzapine did not differ significantly from placebo for any of the five central nervous system anticholinergic events nor on the ADAS-Cog. Olanzapine’s initially reported potent in vitro muscarinic receptor affinity is not consistent with this clinical study of central nervous system anticholinergic-like adverse events in patients with AD.
    Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

W. M. Alves – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • randomized multicenter dose ranging trial of retigabine for partial onset seizures
    Neurology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Roger J. Porter, A. Partiot, R. Sachdeo, Virinder Nohria, W. M. Alves

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of retigabine 600, 900, and 1,200 mg/day administered three times daily as adjunctive therapy in patients with partial-onset seizures. METHODS: A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed. After an 8-week baseline phase, patients were randomized to a 16-week double-blind treatment period (8-week forced titration and 8-week maintenance) followed by either tapering or entry into an open-label extension study. Primary efficacy was the percentage change from baseline in monthly seizure frequency and compared across treatment arms. Secondary efficacy comparisons included the proportion of patients experiencing >/=50% reduction in seizure frequency (responder rate), emergence of new seizure types, and physician assessment of global clinical improvement. Safety/tolerability assessments included adverse events (AEs), physical and neurologic examinations, and clinical laboratory evaluations. Efficacy analyses were performed on the intent-to-treat population. RESULTS: Of the 399 randomized patients, 279 (69.9%) completed the double-blind treatment period. The median percent change in monthly total partial seizure frequency from baseline was -23% for 600 mg/day, -29% for 900 mg/day, and -35% for 1,200 mg/day vs -13% for placebo (p < 0.001 for overall difference across all treatment arms). Responder rates for retigabine were 23% for 600 mg/day, 32% for 900 mg/day (p = 0.021), and 33% for 1,200 mg/day (p = 0.016), vs 16% for placebo. The most common treatment-emergent AEs were somnolence, dizziness, confusion, speech disorder, vertigo, tremor, amnesia, Abnormal Thinking, Abnormal gait, paresthesia, and diplopia. CONCLUSION: Adjunctive therapy with retigabine is well tolerated and reduces the frequency of partial-onset seizures in a dose-dependent manner.

  • Randomized, multicenter, dose-ranging trial of retigabine for partial-onset seizures
    Neurology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Roger J. Porter, A. Partiot, R. Sachdeo, Virinder Nohria, W. M. Alves

    Abstract:

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of retigabine 600, 900, and 1,200 mg/day administered three times daily as adjunctive therapy in patients with partial-onset seizures. Methods: A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed. After an 8-week baseline phase, patients were randomized to a 16-week double-blind treatment period (8-week forced titration and 8-week maintenance) followed by either tapering or entry into an open-label extension study. Primary efficacy was the percentage change from baseline in monthly seizure frequency and compared across treatment arms. Secondary efficacy comparisons included the proportion of patients experiencing ≥50% reduction in seizure frequency (responder rate), emergence of new seizure types, and physician assessment of global clinical improvement. Safety/tolerability assessments included adverse events (AEs), physical and neurologic examinations, and clinical laboratory evaluations. Efficacy analyses were performed on the intent-to-treat population. Results: Of the 399 randomized patients, 279 (69.9%) completed the double-blind treatment period. The median percent change in monthly total partial seizure frequency from baseline was −23% for 600 mg/day, −29% for 900 mg/day, and −35% for 1,200 mg/day vs −13% for placebo ( p p = 0.021), and 33% for 1,200 mg/day ( p = 0.016), vs 16% for placebo. The most common treatment-emergent AEs were somnolence, dizziness, confusion, speech disorder, vertigo, tremor, amnesia, Abnormal Thinking, Abnormal gait, paresthesia, and diplopia. Conclusion: Adjunctive therapy with retigabine is well tolerated and reduces the frequency of partial-onset seizures in a dose-dependent manner.