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Abrasive Action

The Experts below are selected from a list of 225 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

A C Patil – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • comparison of effectiveness of Abrasive and enzymatic Action of whitening toothpastes in removal of extrinsic stains a clinical trial
    International Journal of Dental Hygiene, 2015
    Co-Authors: P A Patil, Anil V Ankola, M I Hebbal, A C Patil

    Abstract:

    Objective

    To compare the effectiveness of Abrasive component (perlite/calcium carbonate) and enzymatic component (papain and bromelain) of whitening toothpaste in removal of extrinsic stains.

    Methods

    This study is a randomized, triple blind and parallel group study in which 90 subjects aged 18–40 years were included. At baseline, stains scores were assessed by Macpherson’s modification of Lobene Stain Index and subjects were randomly assigned to two groups with 45 subjects in each. Group 1 used whitening toothpaste with enzymatic Action and group 2 with Abrasive Action. After 1 month, stain scores were assessed for the effectiveness of the two toothpastes and 2 months later to check the stain prevention efficacy. Wilcoxson’s test was used to compare between baseline 1 and 2 months stain scores, and Mann–Witney U-test was applied for intragroup comparison.

    Results

    The mean baseline total stain score for the subjects allocated to the enzymatic toothpaste was 37.24 ± 2.11 which reduced to 30.77 ± 2.48 in 1 month, and for the Abrasive paste, total stain reduced from 35.08 ± 2.96 to 32.89 ± 1.95. The reductions in total stain scores with both the pastes were significant compared with baseline stain scores (at 1 month Group 1, P = 0.0233 and Group 2, P = 0.0324; at 2 months, Group 1 P = 0.0356). Both the toothpastes proved to be equally good in removal of extrinsic stains; however, the enzymatic paste showed better results as compared to Abrasive toothpaste.

    Conclusion

    Whitening toothpaste with Abrasive Action and enzymatic Action are equally effective in removal of extrinsic stains; however, whitening toothpaste with Abrasive Action needs to be used with caution.

  • Comparison of effectiveness of Abrasive and enzymatic Action of whitening toothpastes in removal of extrinsic stains – a clinical trial
    International Journal of Dental Hygiene, 2014
    Co-Authors: P A Patil, Anil V Ankola, M I Hebbal, A C Patil

    Abstract:

    Objective

    To compare the effectiveness of Abrasive component (perlite/calcium carbonate) and enzymatic component (papain and bromelain) of whitening toothpaste in removal of extrinsic stains.

    Methods

    This study is a randomized, triple blind and parallel group study in which 90 subjects aged 18–40 years were included. At baseline, stains scores were assessed by Macpherson’s modification of Lobene Stain Index and subjects were randomly assigned to two groups with 45 subjects in each. Group 1 used whitening toothpaste with enzymatic Action and group 2 with Abrasive Action. After 1 month, stain scores were assessed for the effectiveness of the two toothpastes and 2 months later to check the stain prevention efficacy. Wilcoxson’s test was used to compare between baseline 1 and 2 months stain scores, and Mann–Witney U-test was applied for intragroup comparison.

    Results

    The mean baseline total stain score for the subjects allocated to the enzymatic toothpaste was 37.24 ± 2.11 which reduced to 30.77 ± 2.48 in 1 month, and for the Abrasive paste, total stain reduced from 35.08 ± 2.96 to 32.89 ± 1.95. The reductions in total stain scores with both the pastes were significant compared with baseline stain scores (at 1 month Group 1, P = 0.0233 and Group 2, P = 0.0324; at 2 months, Group 1 P = 0.0356). Both the toothpastes proved to be equally good in removal of extrinsic stains; however, the enzymatic paste showed better results as compared to Abrasive toothpaste.

    Conclusion

    Whitening toothpaste with Abrasive Action and enzymatic Action are equally effective in removal of extrinsic stains; however, whitening toothpaste with Abrasive Action needs to be used with caution.

Navjot Singh Mann – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Abrasive Action of herbal vs non herbal toothpaste a profilometric analysis
    Journal of pharmaceutical and biomedical sciences, 2017
    Co-Authors: Anurag Aggarwal, Shalu Krishan, Vasu Midha, Shubhpreet Kaur, Deepak Bala, Preetinder Singh, Amit Bhagat, Navjot Singh Mann

    Abstract:

    Introduction Toothpaste is a dentrifice used with a toothbrush as an accessory to clean and maintain the aesthetics and health of teeth. It serves as an Abrasive that aids in removing the dental plaque and food from the teeth, assists in suppressing halitosis and delivers active ingredients to help prevent tooth decay and gum disease, thereby promoting oral health. Current trend is shifting towards alternate medicinal systems especially herbal medicines. Herbal toothpastes have received attention from the public and professionals following a number of studies which have reported beneficial effects on teeth. However, no study has been conducted on the detrimental effect of herbal toothpaste on the surface enamel owing to its Abrasiveness. So, in this study, we evaluated and compared the effect of herbal-based products with conventionally formulated tooth paste on the roughness of tooth enamel. Materials and Methods Enamel specimens were obtained from 20 freshly extracted human molars after cleaning. The enamel specimens were divided into four groups. Group A: Colgate toothpaste (which will be served as control group); Group B: Patanjali Dant Kanti toothpaste; Group C: Himalaya Hiora toothpaste; and Group D: Dabur Red toothpaste. The samples were brushed for 2 min twice daily with soft toothbrush for 15 days and were kept in distilled water. They were rinsed under running water to remove the toothpaste and stored in distilled water until readout was taken on the surface profilometric analysis for surface roughness. Conclusion Himalaya Hiora and Patanjali Dant Kanti tooth paste were less Abrasive on tooth surface compared to Colgate and Dabur red. However, Himalaya Hiora had even lesser Abrasive compared to Patanjali Dant Kanti.

Martti Toivakka – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Wear resistance of nanoparticle coatings on paperboard
    Wear, 2013
    Co-Authors: Milena Stepien, Gary Chinga-carrasco, Jarkko J. Saarinen, Hannu Teisala, Mikko Tuominen, Mikko Aromaa, Janne Haapanen, Jurkka Kuusipalo, Jyrki M. Mäkelä, Martti Toivakka

    Abstract:

    Paper can be coated with liquid flame spray (LFS) generated nanoparticles to control the wettability of its surface from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic. The adhesion of the nanoparticles on paper is of interest both for understanding the product durability during its lifetime and for product safety issues. Poor particle adhesion influences the desired functional properties and released nanoparticles cause health and environmental concerns. To investigate the wear resistance of LFS-TiO_2 and -SiO_2 coated papers, the nanoparticle surfaces were exposed to rotary abrasion tests. The changes in the samples were analyzed by contact angle measurements and high resolution field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). After Abrasive Action with another paperboard surface, only relatively small changes in wettability of superhydrophobic/hydrophilic coatings were found. A more severe Abrasive Action will remove some of the nanoparticle coating, but the hydrophobic/hydrophilic character of the surface is still maintained to large extent. The results indicate that the wear resistance of LFS nanocoated paper surfaces differs and depends on the nanoparticle material type used for the coating. This is clearly reflected as changes in surface structure shown by FE-SEM and wettability. The results can help understanding which paper-related application areas could be targeted with the LFS-nanoparticle coating process.

  • Wear resistance of nanoparticle coatings on paperboard
    Wear, 2013
    Co-Authors: Milena Stepien, Gary Chinga-carrasco, Jarkko J. Saarinen, Hannu Teisala, Mikko Tuominen, Mikko Aromaa, Janne Haapanen, Jurkka Kuusipalo, Jyrki M. Mäkelä, Martti Toivakka

    Abstract:

    Paper can be coated with liquid flame spray (LFS) generated nanoparticles to control the wettability of its surface from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic. The adhesion of the nanoparticles on paper is of interest both for understanding the product durability during its lifetime and for product safety issues. Poor particle adhesion influences the desired functional properties and released nanoparticles cause health and environmental concerns. To investigate the wear resistance of LFS-TiO2and -SiO2coated papers, the nanoparticle surfaces were exposed to rotary abrasion tests. The changes in the samples were analyzed by contact angle measurements and high resolution field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). After Abrasive Action with another paperboard surface, only relatively small changes in wettability of superhydrophobic/hydrophilic coatings were found. A more severe Abrasive Action will remove some of the nanoparticle coating, but the hydrophobic/hydrophilic character of the surface is still maintained to large extent. The results indicate that the wear resistance of LFS nanocoated paper surfaces differs and depends on the nanoparticle material type used for the coating. This is clearly reflected as changes in surface structure shown by FE-SEM and wettability. The results can help understanding which paper-related application areas could be targeted with the LFS-nanoparticle coating process. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.