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D P Mondal – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • synergic effect of reinforcement and heat treatment on the two body Abrasive wear of an al si alloy under varying loads and Abrasive Sizes
    Wear, 2008
    Co-Authors: D P Mondal, S Sawla, N Ramakrishnan

    Abstract:

    In the present study, an attempt was made to examine the synergic effect of SiC particle reinforcement and heat treatment on the two body Abrasive wear behavior of an Al–Si alloy (BS: LM13) under varying loads and Abrasive Sizes. Silicon carbide particles with Size 50–80 μm were reinforced in Al–Si alloy, in varying concentration (10 wt% and 15 wt%), by solidification process (vortex technique) and the composite melt was solidified by gravity casting in a cast iron die. The alloy and composites were solution treated at 495 °C for 8 h, quenched in water and aged at 175 °C for 6 h and cooled in air. Two body Abrasive wear behaviour of cast and heat-treated alloy and composite, was examined against Abrasives of different Sizes (40 μm, 60 μm and 80 μm), at varying applied loads (1 N, 3 N, 5 N and 7 N), up to a sliding distance of 108 m. It has been noted that the alloy suffers from higher wear rate than that of composites either in cast or heat-treated conditions, irrespective of applied load and Abrasive Size. Further, in most of the cases, the wear rate of composite decreases with increase in SiC particle content. Efforts were made to correlate wear behavior of Al alloy and composites in terms of mechanical properties, microstructural characteristics, applied load and Abrasive Size through an empirical equation.

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  • High-stress Abrasive wear response of 0.2% carbon dual phase steel: Effects of microstructural features and experimental conditions
    Materials Science and Engineering: A, 2007
    Co-Authors: O.p Modi, B. K. Prasad, A. H. Yegneswaran, D P Mondal, Pallavi Pandit, Andreas Chrysanthou

    Abstract:

    Effects of heat treatment on the high-stress Abrasive wear response of 0.2% carbon steel have been investigated at varying applied loads, Abrasive (SiC) Sizes and sliding distances. The heat treatment involved intercritical annealing at three different temperatures between Ac-1 and Ac-3 followed by ice water quenching in order to produce a dual phase microstructure consisting of varying quantities of ferrite plus martensite. The wear rate increased monotonically with applied load irrespective of the heat treatment schedule. Further, the wear rate increased drastically when the Abrasive Size was increased from 15 to 27 mu m; a further increase in the Abrasive Size led to only a marginal increase in the wear rate. In general, the wear rate decreased with increasing sliding distance and attained a nearly stable value at longer sliding distances. Increasing intercritical annealing temperature resulted into higher martensite content, thereby leading to reduced wear rate. However, the extent of reduction in wear rate with martensite content has been found to change with the applied load and Abrasive Size. The present investigation clearly suggests that it is quite possible to attain desired combinations of bulk hardness and microstructure (ferrite plus martensite) that could greatly control Abrasive wear properties in low carbon steel. The observed wear response of the samples has been explained on the basis of microconstituent-Abrasive interaction during the course of Abrasive action, degradation of the Abrasive particles and the nature of various microconstituents, i.e. mechanical properties. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

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  • high stress Abrasive wear behaviour of aluminium hard particle composites effect of experimental parameters particle Size and volume fraction
    Tribology International, 2006
    Co-Authors: D P Mondal

    Abstract:

    Abstract High stress Abrasive wear behaviour of aluminium alloy (ADC-12)–SiC particle reinforced composites has been studied as a function of applied load, reinforcement Size and volume fraction, and has been compared with that of the matrix alloy. Two different Size ranges (25–50 and 50–80 μm) of SiC particles have been used for synthesizing ADC-12–SiC composite. The volume fraction of SiC particles has been varied in the ranges from 5 to 15 wt%. It has been noted that the Abrasive wear rate of the alloy reduced considerably due to addition of SiC particle and the wear rate of composite decreases linearly with increase in SiC content. It has also been noted that the wear resistance of composite varies inversely with square of the reinforcement Size. The wear rate of the alloy and composite has been found to be a linear function of applied load but invariant to the Abrasive Size; at critical Abrasive Size, transition in wear behaviour is noted. This has been explained through analytically derived equations and wear–surface examination.

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A. H. Yegneswaran – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • High-stress Abrasive wear response of 0.2% carbon dual phase steel: Effects of microstructural features and experimental conditions
    Materials Science and Engineering A-structural Materials Properties Microstructure and Processing, 2007
    Co-Authors: O.p Modi, Dehi Pada Mondal, B. K. Prasad, A. H. Yegneswaran, Pallavi Pandit, Andreas Chrysanthou

    Abstract:

    Abstract Effects of heat treatment on the high-stress Abrasive wear response of 0.2% carbon steel have been investigated at varying applied loads, Abrasive (SiC) Sizes and sliding distances. The heat treatment involved intercritical annealing at three different temperatures between Ac 1 and Ac 3 followed by ice water quenching in order to produce a dual phase microstructure consisting of varying quantities of ferrite plus martensite. The wear rate increased monotonically with applied load irrespective of the heat treatment schedule. Further, the wear rate increased drastically when the Abrasive Size was increased from 15 to 27 μm; a further increase in the Abrasive Size led to only a marginal increase in the wear rate. In general, the wear rate decreased with increasing sliding distance and attained a nearly stable value at longer sliding distances. Increasing intercritical annealing temperature resulted into higher martensite content, thereby leading to reduced wear rate. However, the extent of reduction in wear rate with martensite content has been found to change with the applied load and Abrasive Size. The present investigation clearly suggests that it is quite possible to attain desired combinations of bulk hardness and microstructure (ferrite plus martensite) that could greatly control Abrasive wear properties in low carbon steel. The observed wear response of the samples has been explained on the basis of microconstituent–Abrasive interaction during the course of Abrasive action, degradation of the Abrasive particles and the nature of various microconstituents, i.e. mechanical properties.

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  • High-stress Abrasive wear response of 0.2% carbon dual phase steel: Effects of microstructural features and experimental conditions
    Materials Science and Engineering: A, 2007
    Co-Authors: O.p Modi, B. K. Prasad, A. H. Yegneswaran, D P Mondal, Pallavi Pandit, Andreas Chrysanthou

    Abstract:

    Effects of heat treatment on the high-stress Abrasive wear response of 0.2% carbon steel have been investigated at varying applied loads, Abrasive (SiC) Sizes and sliding distances. The heat treatment involved intercritical annealing at three different temperatures between Ac-1 and Ac-3 followed by ice water quenching in order to produce a dual phase microstructure consisting of varying quantities of ferrite plus martensite. The wear rate increased monotonically with applied load irrespective of the heat treatment schedule. Further, the wear rate increased drastically when the Abrasive Size was increased from 15 to 27 mu m; a further increase in the Abrasive Size led to only a marginal increase in the wear rate. In general, the wear rate decreased with increasing sliding distance and attained a nearly stable value at longer sliding distances. Increasing intercritical annealing temperature resulted into higher martensite content, thereby leading to reduced wear rate. However, the extent of reduction in wear rate with martensite content has been found to change with the applied load and Abrasive Size. The present investigation clearly suggests that it is quite possible to attain desired combinations of bulk hardness and microstructure (ferrite plus martensite) that could greatly control Abrasive wear properties in low carbon steel. The observed wear response of the samples has been explained on the basis of microconstituent-Abrasive interaction during the course of Abrasive action, degradation of the Abrasive particles and the nature of various microconstituents, i.e. mechanical properties. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

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  • High stress Abrasive wear behavior of sillimanite-reinforced Al-alloy matrix composite: A factorial design approach
    Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance, 2003
    Co-Authors: M Singh, D P Mondal, A. H. Yegneswaran

    Abstract:

    An attempt has been made to explore the possibility of using a natural mineral, namely sillimanite, as dispersoid for synthesizing aluminum alloy composite by solidification technique. The Abrasive wear behavior of this composite has been studied through factorial design of experiments. The wear behavior of the composite ( Y _composite) and the alloy ( Y _alloy) is expressed in terms of the coded values of different experimental parameters like applied load ( x _1), Abrasive Size ( x _2), and sliding distance ( x _3) by the following linear regression equations: $$\begin{gathered} = 20.94 + 15.22x_1 + 5.94x_2 – 1.95x_3 + 4.82x_1 x_2 – 1.45x_1 x_3 + 1.29x_2 x_3 + 1.60x_1 x_2 x_3 \hfill \\ Y_{composite} = 21.05 + 15.69x_1 + 9.5x_2 – 2.51x_3 + 7.41x_1 x_2 – 2.33x_1 x_3 + 0.52x_2 x_3 + 0.10x_1 x_2 x_3 \hfill \\ \end{gathered} $$ These equations suggest that (i) the effect of the load is more severe on the wear rate of each of the materials and (ii) the wear rate of the materials increases with an increase in applied load and Abrasive Size, but decreases with increase in sliding distance (iii) interaction of these parameters are quite significant towards the wear of these materials (iv) above a critical load and Abrasive Size the composite suffers from higher wear rate than that of the matrix alloy. These facts have been explained on the basis of wear mechanisms.

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J.h. Shin – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the effect of ceo2 Abrasive Size on dishing and step height reduction of silicon oxide film in sti cmp
    Surface & Coatings Technology, 2005
    Co-Authors: Dae-soon Lim, Jinhee Ahn, H.s. Park, J.h. Shin

    Abstract:

    Abstract The effect of the CeO 2 Abrasive Size during chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of shallow trench isolation (STI) structures was investigated, in order to minimize the amount of oxide dishing and to improve the planarization efficiency. Three slurry samples were prepared based on a 1.0 wt.% Abrasive concentration with different Sizes of ceria particles. The step height and dishing reduction were investigated as a function of the polishing time with pattern wafers in prepared slurries. The reduction in thickness as a function of the polishing time varied between the different slurries. The dependence of the step height reduction of the patterned wafer on the polishing time showed non-linear behavior in all of the tested slurries. The amount of dishing also varied with the type of slurry. The changes in the cross-sectional profiles of the oxide as a function of the polishing time were analyzed, in order to establish a dishing and step height reduction model depending on the Abrasive Size. The step height variation and dishing were varied with the Size of the Abrasive. The observed results were explained by the contribution of inactive particles, which depended on relative Size of the Abrasives and the height of the remaining oxide layer.

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  • The effect of CeO2 Abrasive Size on dishing and step height reduction of silicon oxide film in STI–CMP
    Surface & Coatings Technology, 2005
    Co-Authors: Dae-soon Lim, Jinhee Ahn, H.s. Park, J.h. Shin

    Abstract:

    Abstract The effect of the CeO 2 Abrasive Size during chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of shallow trench isolation (STI) structures was investigated, in order to minimize the amount of oxide dishing and to improve the planarization efficiency. Three slurry samples were prepared based on a 1.0 wt.% Abrasive concentration with different Sizes of ceria particles. The step height and dishing reduction were investigated as a function of the polishing time with pattern wafers in prepared slurries. The reduction in thickness as a function of the polishing time varied between the different slurries. The dependence of the step height reduction of the patterned wafer on the polishing time showed non-linear behavior in all of the tested slurries. The amount of dishing also varied with the type of slurry. The changes in the cross-sectional profiles of the oxide as a function of the polishing time were analyzed, in order to establish a dishing and step height reduction model depending on the Abrasive Size. The step height variation and dishing were varied with the Size of the Abrasive. The observed results were explained by the contribution of inactive particles, which depended on relative Size of the Abrasives and the height of the remaining oxide layer.

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