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Abrasive Wear

The Experts below are selected from a list of 285 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

U. S. Tewari – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • two body and three body Abrasive Wear behaviour of polyaryletherketone composites
    Polymer Testing, 2003
    Co-Authors: A. P. Harsha, U. S. Tewari

    Abstract:

    Abstract Single and multipass two-body and three-body Abrasive Wear behaviour of various polyaryletherketone composites have been carried out by using a pin-on-disc machine and a rubber wheel abrasion test (RWAT) rig. Abrasive Wear studies were conducted under different loads and sliding distances. Comparative Wear performance of all the composites at different loads shows that specific Wear rate ( K o ) of two-body Abrasive Wear (single pass condition) is 30–50 times greater than three-body Abrasive Wear. Also, specific Wear rate ( K o ) of two-body Abrasive Wear (multipass condition) is 5–12 times greater than three-body Abrasive Wear. Efforts were made to correlate the Abrasive Wear performance with the appropriate mechanical properties. The operating Wear mechanisms under different experimental condition have also been studied by using scanning electron microscopy.

  • The Effect of Fibre Reinforcement and Solid Lubricants on Abrasive Wear Behavior of Polyetheretherketone Composites
    Journal of Reinforced Plastics and Composites, 2003
    Co-Authors: A. P. Harsha, U. S. Tewari

    Abstract:

    The tribo performance evaluations were carried out for various composites of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) filled with short glass, carbon fibre, and solid lubricants in Abrasive Wear situation. Abrasive Wear studies were carried out under single pass condition against SiC Abrasive paper by using pin-on-disc machine. The influence of variables such as sliding distance, load and Abrasive grit size has been investigated. It was observed that fibre reinforcement deteriorated the Abrasive Wear resistance of neat PEEK matrix. Combination of fibre and particulate filler is more detrimental to Abrasive Wear performance. Efforts were made to correlate the Abrasive Wear performance with the appropriate mechanical properties. Ratner-Lancaster plot showed linear correlation. SEM was used to analyse the worn surfaces of the samples.

  • Three-body Abrasive Wear behaviour of polyaryletherketone composites
    Wear, 2003
    Co-Authors: A. P. Harsha, U. S. Tewari, B. Venkatraman

    Abstract:

    Abstract An experimental investigation was carried out to study the effect of reinforcement fibres, solid lubricants, mass of Abrasives and load in three-body Abrasive Wear situations on various polyaryletherketone (PAEK) matrix. Three-body Abrasive Wear studies were carried out using a rubber wheel abrasion test (RWAT) rig. In the present investigation, angular silica sand particles of size ranging between 150 and 300 μm were used as dry and loose Abrasives. The ketone/ether ratios among the selected PAEKs have shown significant influence on three-body Abrasive Wear behaviour at higher load. It was observed that fibre reinforcement is detrimental to the Abrasive Wear resistance of neat PAEK matrix. A combination of fibre and particulate filler is more detrimental to Abrasive Wear performance. Efforts were made to correlate the Abrasive Wear performance of the composites with appropriate mechanical properties. The Ratner–Lancaster plot showed a linear correlation. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the worn surfaces and to understand the mechanisms involved in the removal of the material.

J M Yellup – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Abrasive Wear of aluminium composites a review
    Wear, 1996
    Co-Authors: Robert Leslie Deuis, C Subramanian, J M Yellup

    Abstract:

    Abstract Aluminium-silicon alloys and aluminium-based metal-matrix composites (MMCs) containing hard particles offer superior operating performance and resistance to Wear. In industrial processes where Abrasive slurries are transported by rotating paddles or impellers, clements fabricated from MMC materials provide higher Abrasive resistance and therefore a longer service life compared to those made from iron or nickel-based alloys. Composites characterized by a hardness greater than the Abrasive particles and a reinforcement phase of high fracture toughness and low mean free path, compared to the Abrasive grift dimension, exhibit high Abrasive Wear resistance. Studies related to Abrasive Wear of AlSi alloys and aluminium-based MMCs that contain discontinuous reinforcement phases are reviewed.

  • Abrasive Wear of aluminium composites—a review
    Wear, 1996
    Co-Authors: Robert Leslie Deuis, C Subramanian, J M Yellup

    Abstract:

    Aluminium-silicon alloys and aluminium-based metal-matrix composites (MMCs) containing hard particles offer superior operating performance and resistance to Wear. In industrial processes where Abrasive slurries are transported by rotating paddles or impellers, clements fabricated from MMC materials provide higher Abrasive resistance and therefore a longer service life compared to those made from iron or nickel-based alloys. Composites characterized by a hardness greater than the Abrasive particles and a reinforcement phase of high fracture toughness and low mean free path, compared to the Abrasive grift dimension, exhibit high Abrasive Wear resistance. Studies related to Abrasive Wear of AlSi alloys and aluminium-based MMCs that contain discontinuous reinforcement phases are reviewed.

Jayashree Bijwe – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Dimensional analysis for Abrasive Wear behaviour of various polyamides
    Tribology Letters, 2005
    Co-Authors: John J Rajesh, Jayashree Bijwe

    Abstract:

    Abrasive Wear behaviour of a series of polyamides (PAs) with different methylene to amide ratio (CH2/CONH) was analysed using Buckingham’s dimensional analysis method and efforts for quantifying the contribution of the material properties towards the Abrasive Wear performance were also made. In order to calculate the Wear coefficient (K), the data based on the experimental Wear volume, operating parameters and the material properties were fitted into the non-linear Wear equation. The non-linear Wear equation was derived based on pi theorem using the dimensional analysis technique. The Wear coefficient K decreased as load and Abrasive grit size were increased. The theoretical and experimental Wear volume correlated well in most of the cases. Among the selected material properties, the fracture stress (σ*) and the critical crack length (C*) were found to be the most important parameters, which controlled the Abrasive Wear behaviour of PAs.

  • Abrasive Wear performance of various polyamides
    Wear, 2002
    Co-Authors: John J Rajesh, Jayashree Bijwe, U. S. Tewari

    Abstract:

    Abstract Polyamides (PAs) form a major class of tribo-polymers used in almost all types of Wear situations. They excel most of the engineering polymers especially in the case of Abrasive Wear performance. Since methylene (CH 2 ) to amide (CONH) group ratio in PAs control the physical and mechanical properties, it was thought interesting to examine its influence on tribo-performance also. Hence, two types of PAs (addition and condensation) were selected for the present study. Abrasive Wear studies on 10 PAs were done in a single pass condition by abrading a polymer pin against a waterproof silicon carbide (SiC) Abrasive paper under various loads. It was observed that CH 2 /CONH ratio had a significant influence on various mechanical properties such as tensile strength, elongation to break, fracture toughness, fracture energy and therefore, on the Abrasive Wear performance. It was observed that CH 2 /CONH ratio and various mechanical properties when plotted individually did not show linear relation in most of the cases, while the specific Wear rate as a function of some mechanical properties showed good correlation.

  • Influence of fillers and fibre reinforcement on Abrasive Wear resistance of some polymeric composites
    Wear, 1990
    Co-Authors: Jayashree Bijwe, C.m. Logani, U. S. Tewari

    Abstract:

    Fillers and fibre reinforcement increase the strength and stiffness of a polymer, and hence are effective in reducing Wear in dry sliding conditions involving adhesion transfer or fatigue. However, in Abrasive Wear, such reinforcements are less effective and, in some cases, increase the Abrasive Wear rate. For a better understanding of this, Abrasive Wear studies were carried out on four types of polymers and their filler- and/or fibre-reinforced composites, abrading the polymer pins against an Abrasive surface of silicon carbide paper of a fixed grit size. In most cases, the specific Wear rate decreased with an increase in load. Except for bronze-filled polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), all the fillers (carbon, graphite, PTFE and MoS2) as well as short glass fibres increased Abrasive Wear. These results may be attributed to the reinforcement greatly reducing the ultimate elongation to fracture which in turn is a key factor in Abrasive Wear performance. The extent of counterface modification in multipass studies was observed to be another important factor in the Abrasive Wear performance of the composites. Worn pin and paper surfaces were also studied with scanning electron microscopy. © 1990.