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Absent Parent

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Absent Parent – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Jennifer Mcintosh – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A Phenomenological Analysis of the Experience of Security and Contentment for Latency Aged Children in Shared-time Parenting Arrangements
    Journal of Phenomenological Psychology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Christina Sadowski, Jennifer Mcintosh

    Abstract:

    This study explored the lived experience of security and contentment, and their absence, for latency-aged children (aged 8–12) living in shared-time Parenting arrangements following their Parents’ separation. A descriptive phenomenological methodology was utilized (Giorgi, 1985, 2009; Giorgi & Giorgi, 2003, 2008). Sixteen children living in shared-time were interviewed about their experiences of two phenomena: “feeling secure and content living in shared-time” and “not feeling secure and content living in shared-time.” The eight richest protocols were selected for analysis. The two resultant general structures and their core constituents are presented, and individual variations discussed. Central to each phenomenon is the Parent/s’ capacity, or incapacity, to create and sustain a physical and emotional space in which the child feels secure and held in the mind, feels the arrangements are responsive to their needs, feels free to access the “AbsentParent, and experiences integration between the two Parental homes. Implications for phenomenological human science research are considered, including the use of descriptive phenomenology with children.

  • On laughter and loss: Children’s views of shared time, Parenting and security post-separation:
    Childhood, 2015
    Co-Authors: Christina Sadowski, Jennifer Mcintosh

    Abstract:

    Among the research, practice and socio-legal commentary on the substantial sharing of Parenting time after separation, children’s voices about their experiences remain overwhelmingly silent. This article draws on findings of a descriptive phenomenological study which investigated Australian school-aged (8- to 12-year-old) children’s descriptions of two binary phenomena: security and contentment in shared time arrangements, and the absence of security and contentment in shared time Parenting. Specifically, this article focuses on exploring Parental behaviours and interactions recognised by children as sources of security in shared time lifestyles, through happy and needy times. Central to this is the juxtaposition of the child’s experience of security and shared enjoyment with the present Parent, against the absence of security emanating from unresolved longing for the ‘AbsentParent. The article provides an empirically derived formulation of children’s advice to Parents about shared time Parenting, with relevance for family law related Parent education forums.

Christina Sadowski – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A Phenomenological Analysis of the Experience of Security and Contentment for Latency Aged Children in Shared-time Parenting Arrangements
    Journal of Phenomenological Psychology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Christina Sadowski, Jennifer Mcintosh

    Abstract:

    This study explored the lived experience of security and contentment, and their absence, for latency-aged children (aged 8–12) living in shared-time Parenting arrangements following their Parents’ separation. A descriptive phenomenological methodology was utilized (Giorgi, 1985, 2009; Giorgi & Giorgi, 2003, 2008). Sixteen children living in shared-time were interviewed about their experiences of two phenomena: “feeling secure and content living in shared-time” and “not feeling secure and content living in shared-time.” The eight richest protocols were selected for analysis. The two resultant general structures and their core constituents are presented, and individual variations discussed. Central to each phenomenon is the Parent/s’ capacity, or incapacity, to create and sustain a physical and emotional space in which the child feels secure and held in the mind, feels the arrangements are responsive to their needs, feels free to access the “AbsentParent, and experiences integration between the two Parental homes. Implications for phenomenological human science research are considered, including the use of descriptive phenomenology with children.

  • On laughter and loss: Children’s views of shared time, Parenting and security post-separation:
    Childhood, 2015
    Co-Authors: Christina Sadowski, Jennifer Mcintosh

    Abstract:

    Among the research, practice and socio-legal commentary on the substantial sharing of Parenting time after separation, children’s voices about their experiences remain overwhelmingly silent. This article draws on findings of a descriptive phenomenological study which investigated Australian school-aged (8- to 12-year-old) children’s descriptions of two binary phenomena: security and contentment in shared time arrangements, and the absence of security and contentment in shared time Parenting. Specifically, this article focuses on exploring Parental behaviours and interactions recognised by children as sources of security in shared time lifestyles, through happy and needy times. Central to this is the juxtaposition of the child’s experience of security and shared enjoyment with the present Parent, against the absence of security emanating from unresolved longing for the ‘AbsentParent. The article provides an empirically derived formulation of children’s advice to Parents about shared time Parenting, with relevance for family law related Parent education forums.

Jodi A. Quas – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • When Is Neglect, Neglect?: It Depends on Who You Ask
    Child maltreatment, 2017
    Co-Authors: Kelli L. Dickerson, Sonia Lindner, Nicholas Scurich, Jodi A. Quas

    Abstract:

    In order to identify victims of child neglect, social service workers rely heavily on referrals from concerned friends, neighbors, and others in the community. Little is known, however, about how lay individuals perceive child neglect and what factors influence their decision to make a referral. This study explored the effects of child, Parent, and participant gender on laypersons’ evaluations of child neglect. Participants read a case of neglect of a child by a custodial and Absent Parent and then rated the Parents’ culpability and intentionality and decided whether the Parents’ behavior met the legal definition of neglect. When evaluating the custodial Parent, men but not women viewed fathers as more culpable than mothers for the neglect of their son and viewed mothers as somewhat more culpable for the neglect of their daughter. Men also perceived Absent mothers as more intentionally harmful than Absent fathers. Finally, both men and women were more likely to qualify Parental behavior as legally neglectful when the genders of the custodial Parent and child matched. Results, which suggest that gender bias may exist in laypersons’ perceptions of child neglect and may influence their decisions to report, have implications for identification of and intervention for vulnerable children and families.