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Joachim Zentes – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • towards a science of logistics cornerstones of a framework of understanding of logistics as an Academic Discipline
    Logistics Research, 2010
    Co-Authors: Werner Delfmann, Wilhelm Dangelmaier, W A Gunthner, Peter Klaus, Ludger Overmeyer, Werner Rothengatter, Jurgen Weber, Joachim Zentes

    Abstract:

    The mission of BVL, the nonprofit German Logistics Association, is to act as an integrative platform to promote the awareness for the importance of logistics in industry, science, and the public arena. It aims to represent the entire spectrum of logistical issues, to develop methods and processes to contribute to the solution of these issues, and to promote and continuously optimise the application of relevant solutions. BVL’s Scientific Advisory Board is supporting BVL’s mission by promoting the dialogue between logistics practice and the Academic community. Its members come from many different Academic backgrounds. While there is no longer any disagreement about the enormous practical relevance of logistics and its steadily growing impact upon day-to-day economic activities, the members of BVL’s Scientific Advisory Board are aware that there still is no widely shared understanding of the identity of logistics as a scientific and Academic Discipline. Against this backdrop, and following a strategic discussion which the Scientific Advisory Board initiated some time ago, the idea of developing a framework of understanding for logistics as an Academic Discipline emerged. For this purpose, a working group was set up comprising the authors of this paper. It reflects the broad spectrum of disciplinary backgrounds and perspectives on the essence of science represented on the Advisory Board. Five key points, as outlined below, were agreed upon as the cornerstones of an understanding of logistics as an Academic Discipline. They were arrived at as the result of an extremely exciting sequence of discussions which took place in the group’s workshop sessions. The cornerstones are designed to serve as a point of reference for continuing indepth, discussions about the ‘‘science of logistics’’ within BVL, and—hopefully—with Academics and logistics practitioners all over the world. A further aim is to contribute to a better understanding of the depth and relevance of the science of logistics among those ‘‘outside’’ the Discipline. The paper starts out with a statement summarising the nature of logistics as a science. This statement is followed by five cornerstone points elaborating the essential characteristics of the Discipline. The authors are members of a working group of the Scientific Advisory Board of German Logistics Association (BVL).

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Guy G. Gable – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A SWOT analysis of the IS Academic Discipline in Australia
    Science & Engineering Faculty, 2016
    Co-Authors: Robert W. Smyth, Guy G. Gable, Graham Pervan

    Abstract:

    The study provides a review of changing perceptions of the Information Systems (IS) Academic Discipline in Australia across the ten year span from 2005 until 2015. The main source of data for this analysis is a series of annual surveys of Heads of Information Systems Departments across all Australian universities. The surveys incorporated questions regarding the perceived Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats pertaining at the time to the IS Academic Discipline in Australia. A review of the annual judgements, augmented by data from other sources, while revealing the inevitable changes of focus over time, brings to the fore a range of persistent and enduring issues demanding the attention of Australia’s IS Academics. Collaborative Doctoral Consortia are proposed as effective mechanisms to exploit the strengths and opportunities and to redress weaknesses and threats identified.

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  • The Information Systems Academic Discipline in Australia
    , 2011
    Co-Authors: Guy G. Gable

    Abstract:

    This paper reports a descriptive case study of the IS Academic Discipline in Australia. One in a series of nine papers comprising a special issue of Communications of the AIS (CAIS) titled “The Information Systems Academic Discipline in Pacific Asia 2006,” this sub-study sought to establish the “beginnings” of a cumulative and ongoing effort to track and report on, and reflect upon the evolution and state of the IS Academic Discipline in Australia (and Pacific Asia and ultimately other world regions). This paper clarifies the role of the Australian study as a preliminary to the larger Pacific Asia study, and draws upon a series of case studies of Australian states and territories to present the Australian situation. The case study protocol, based in Ridley’s [2006] framework on the evolution of Disciplines, suggests an inverse relationship between the impact of local contingencies and a Discipline’s degree of professionalism and maturity. Analysis of Australian data reveals considerable diversity in IS research and teaching across the nation, reflecting the wide geographic spread of universities in Australia. Although in general IS research is not highly contingent upon local exigencies and environmental pressures, the topics researched often reflected personal interests and are only weakly coordinated across research sites. At this time IS in Australia does not possess a unique symbol system that allows unambiguous communication between initiates within the field.

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  • administrative placement of the information systems Academic Discipline a comparative swot analysis
    Communications of The Ais, 2007
    Co-Authors: Guy G. Gable, Keeyoung Kwahk, Peter Green

    Abstract:

    This study uses SWOT analysis to explore perceptions of differential administrative placement of the Information Systems Academic Discipline within four universities across two countries, Australia and Korea. The analysis provides a useful basis for decision makers to exploit opportunities and minimize external threats. The study also offers useful insights for Information Systems Academics contemplating administrative relocation of their group. The paper serves the dual-purpose of (1) informing the positioning of IS in the four case institutions, while (2) evolving an approach and related tools for usefully extending the SWOT analysis to other institutions and states, and across time. The extension of the analysis to other states and to IS groups in differing circumstances will broaden the relevance of study findings, while improving our understanding of differential placement of IS and perceptions of the relative advantages of the alternatives.

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Werner Delfmann – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • towards a science of logistics cornerstones of a framework of understanding of logistics as an Academic Discipline
    Logistics Research, 2010
    Co-Authors: Werner Delfmann, Wilhelm Dangelmaier, W A Gunthner, Peter Klaus, Ludger Overmeyer, Werner Rothengatter, Jurgen Weber, Joachim Zentes

    Abstract:

    The mission of BVL, the nonprofit German Logistics Association, is to act as an integrative platform to promote the awareness for the importance of logistics in industry, science, and the public arena. It aims to represent the entire spectrum of logistical issues, to develop methods and processes to contribute to the solution of these issues, and to promote and continuously optimise the application of relevant solutions. BVL’s Scientific Advisory Board is supporting BVL’s mission by promoting the dialogue between logistics practice and the Academic community. Its members come from many different Academic backgrounds. While there is no longer any disagreement about the enormous practical relevance of logistics and its steadily growing impact upon day-to-day economic activities, the members of BVL’s Scientific Advisory Board are aware that there still is no widely shared understanding of the identity of logistics as a scientific and Academic Discipline. Against this backdrop, and following a strategic discussion which the Scientific Advisory Board initiated some time ago, the idea of developing a framework of understanding for logistics as an Academic Discipline emerged. For this purpose, a working group was set up comprising the authors of this paper. It reflects the broad spectrum of disciplinary backgrounds and perspectives on the essence of science represented on the Advisory Board. Five key points, as outlined below, were agreed upon as the cornerstones of an understanding of logistics as an Academic Discipline. They were arrived at as the result of an extremely exciting sequence of discussions which took place in the group’s workshop sessions. The cornerstones are designed to serve as a point of reference for continuing indepth, discussions about the ‘‘science of logistics’’ within BVL, and—hopefully—with Academics and logistics practitioners all over the world. A further aim is to contribute to a better understanding of the depth and relevance of the science of logistics among those ‘‘outside’’ the Discipline. The paper starts out with a statement summarising the nature of logistics as a science. This statement is followed by five cornerstone points elaborating the essential characteristics of the Discipline. The authors are members of a working group of the Scientific Advisory Board of German Logistics Association (BVL).

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