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David Hughes – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • LibGuides: Academic Writing: Links
    , 2019
    Co-Authors: David Hughes
    Abstract:

    This section looks at Academic Writing and the differences between it and ordinary Writing. After looking at these pages, you should have some idea of what’s involved in Writing Academically Links to useful sites that might help you with Academic Writing

  • LibGuides: Academic Writing: Argument
    , 2019
    Co-Authors: David Hughes
    Abstract:

    This section looks at Academic Writing and the differences between it and ordinary Writing. After looking at these pages, you should have some idea of what’s involved in Writing Academically Academic Writing tells a story. The crux of the story is the argument being made. Arguments must be backed up with evidence

  • LibGuides: Academic Writing: Key features
    , 2019
    Co-Authors: David Hughes
    Abstract:

    This section looks at Academic Writing and the differences between it and ordinary Writing. After looking at these pages, you should have some idea of what’s involved in Writing Academically This page explains the key features of Academic Writing

Graham Badley – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Academic Writing: contested knowledge in the making?
    Quality Assurance in Education, 2009
    Co-Authors: Graham Badley
    Abstract:

    Purpose – This paper seeks to consider whether Academic Writing should be regarded as knowledge in the making and why all such Writing should be continuously challenged.Design/methodology/approach – The approach is that of a reflective discussion which considers Academic Writing in context, knowledge, reflectiveness and helping others to contest Academic Writing.Findings – The paper concludes with the view that all Academic Writing and concept‐mongering are properly open to rigorous challenge.Research limitations/implications – The paper is limited by its presentation of one writer’s stance or point of view. Some may also consider this a strength.Practical implications – Academic developers and those interested in helping train Academic writers especially, but not exclusively, at the postgraduate level should find the ideas presented useful sources for further conversations.Originality/value – The main value of the paper is that it summarizes a view of Academic Writing not as objective or neutral but as p…

  • Academic Writing as shaping and re-shaping
    Teaching in Higher Education, 2009
    Co-Authors: Graham Badley
    Abstract:

    Academic Writing, especially the Writing of research articles, dissertations and theses, is often viewed in the literature as ‘Writing up’. It is as if first comes the research, an active creation of new knowledge, and then comes the Writing, a relatively passive assembling of what has already been achieved. It is as if researching and Writing were two entirely separate processes. Alternatively we may choose to conceive of Academic Writing as a set process which overlaps considerably with researching itself and, indeed, which may contribute dynamically to knowledge making. This article outlines some of the ways in which we may re-conceptualize Academic Writing as a more dynamic set of activities and practices. This includes a consideration of, for example, Academic Writing as constructing, deconstructing and reconstructing knowledge, connecting, disconnecting and reconnecting concepts, describing and re-describing our views of the world, as well as shaping, mis-shaping and reshaping ideas.

  • Action research and Academic Writing: a conversation
    Educational Action Research, 2007
    Co-Authors: Richard Winter, Graham Badley
    Abstract:

    Here is a conversation between two former colleagues about action research and Academic Writing. Richard Winter opens the discussion with a series of reflections on his work as an action researcher. These reflections include the key argument that action research is a noble cause because it is relevant to working life, has a practical impact and enriches what we do in our lives. In response, Graham Badley suggests that, given Richard’s argument, Academic Writing might, for similar reasons, also be considered both as action research and as a noble cause. Richard replies with a concern that Academic Writing often becomes a commodity to be traded in the Academic marketplace. Graham’s final contribution to this dialogue is a commentary on Academic competition and disagreement in Academic Writing.

Ralf Schweizer – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Academic Writing Intercultural And Textual Issues
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Ralf Schweizer
    Abstract:

    Academic Writing intercultural and textual issues is available in our digital library an online access to it is set as public so you can download it instantly. Our digital library saves in multiple locations, allowing you to get the most less latency time to download any of our books like this one. Kindly say, the Academic Writing intercultural and textual issues is universally compatible with any devices to read.

Listyani – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Academic Writing Students’ Perceptions on Teacher Feedback
    , 2019
    Co-Authors: Listyani
    Abstract:

    Academic Writing is a difficult subject for many students because the content requires highly critical Academic thinking. Students have to put their ideas to build up arguments. Teachers’ role is very important here in giving direct and indirect feedback to help students solve problems in their essays. Students’ perceptions of teacher feedback in Academic Writing class is the central focus of this paper. The purpose of the study is to describe Academic Writing students’ perceptions of teacher feedback. Data were taken through interviews with six students of English Language Education Study Program (ELE), of Faculty of Language and Arts (FLA) in Universitas Kristen Satya Wacana (UKSW) Salatiga. They had passed the Academic Writing course at the time the interviews were conducted. The kind of interview that was used in this study is a semi-structured interview. Results showed that some students had positive perceptions towards teacher feedback, while some others showed negative perceptions. The results of this study hopefully can be useful for Academic Writing lecturers to know more about what kind of feedback is best to be given to their students, adjusted with their needs.

Kelsey Lipuma – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The influence of students’ perceptions of Writing on Academic Writing performance
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Kelsey Lipuma
    Abstract:

    Analysis of The Nation’s Report Card (NAEP, 2011) indicates low performance by adolescent students in the area of Academic Writing, which in turn suggests that students in the elementary grades are not developing the Writing skills that will enable them to write successfully as adolescents. Academic Writing involves specific expectations for structure, content, and conventions. While students learn these expectations, students’ perceptions of Writing may also impact their Academic Writing performance. Therefore, to address this problem of students’ low Academic Writing performance, an appropriate research question is, what are fourth grade students’ perceptions of Writing and what is the influence of those perceptions on their Academic Writing performance? This question of perception and influence is appropriately addressed by conducting an empirical study with fourth grade participants and a mixed methodology to determine specific perceptions and their relationship to Writing performance. After measuring Academic Writing performance and collecting data on perception attitude, self-efficacy, and Writing knowledge, analysis has produced three findings. First is that although these participants all had the same teachers and Writing instruction throughout their elementary schooling, their perceptions of Writing are not consistent with each other but range as do their Academic Writing performances. Second is that their knowledge of “Writing” appears to be primarily focused on an Academic concept of Writing, and the third finding is that the relationship between perception and performance appears to have a linear correlation, with neutral attitude and neutral self-efficacy producing below average to average Writing performance. [from abstract]