Acceleration Energy - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Acceleration Energy

The Experts below are selected from a list of 113202 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Acceleration Energy – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

P. Kannus – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Normality, variability and predictability of work, power and torque Acceleration Energy with respect to peak torque in isokinetic muscle testing.
    International journal of sports medicine, 1992
    Co-Authors: P. Kannus

    Abstract:

    This study evaluated at two different test sessions the normality and variability of the isokinetic peak torque (PT), peak work (PW), peak power (PP) and peak torque Acceleration Energy (PTAE) data outputs in healthy adult males (n = 10) and females (n = 10). The hamstring and quadriceps muscles were tested at the angular velocities of 60 deg/s (a slow speed test) and 240 deg/s (a high speed test). The predictability of the PW, PP and PTAE from the PT was also assessed. The results showed that the consistency of the PW and PP measurements were equal with that of the PT. This was due to equal (almost normal) data distribution, equal variability of the outputs (the coefficient of variation (cv) ranged from 14 to 29% in the PWs and PPs versus 16 to 29% in the PTs), and excellent predictability of the PW and PP from the PT (PTs accounted on an average 85% for the variation seen in the PWs and PPs). In addition, in the regression analyses the standard errors of the estimates (SEEs) were low (less than 10%) and the residuals were distributed nonsystematically. In the PTAE measurements, the results were much more inconsistent, especially during the slow speed of the dynamometer. Compared with PT, PW and PP, the PTAE data distribution differed more frequently from normal distribution and the PTAE outputs showed higher variability. In addition, the PTAE outputs could not be acceptably predicted from the PT. In conclusion, the isokinetic PW and PP measurements can be recommended for clinical use, while the PTAE measurements should not be used routinely.

Robert C. Manske – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Difference in isokinetic torque Acceleration Energy of the rotator cuff: competitive male pitchers versus male nonathletes
    , 2004
    Co-Authors: Robert C. Manske, Casey S. Tajchman, Todd A. Stranghoner, Todd S. Ellenbecker

    Abstract:

    The full text of this article is not available in SOAR. Access this article via EBSCO Host # 14215835

  • Difference in isokinetic torque Acceleration Energy of the rotator cuff: competitive male pitchers versus male nonathletes.
    Journal of strength and conditioning research, 2004
    Co-Authors: Robert C. Manske, Casey S. Tajchman, Todd A. Stranghoner, Todd S. Ellenbecker

    Abstract:

    Manske, R.C., C.S. Tajchman, T.A. Stranghoner, and T.S. Ellenbecker. Difference in isokinetic torque accelera- tion Energy of the rotator cuff: Competitive male pitchers versus male nonathletes. J. Strength Cond. Res. 18(3):447-450. 2004.— Rotator cuff function is critical to the overhead athlete. Rotator cuff power is felt to be important in the overhead athlete during the throwing motion. Little research exists regarding torque ac- celeration Energy (TAE) in overhead athletes. Twenty-five males were divided into 2 groups consisting of overhead athletes (pitch- ers) (n 5 12) and nonoverhead athletes (controls) (n 5 13). All participants were given a concentric velocity spectrum isokinetic test at speeds of 608 (1.05 r), 1808 (3.16 r), and 3008·s21 (5.26 r) to both the dominant and nondominant shoulder internal and external rotators. Significant differences were found for all in- ternal rotator TAE scores (p 5 0.000-0.016), at each of the 3 velocities, when comparing dominant to nondominant arms of both overhead athletes and nonoverhead athletes. Only 608·s 21 (1.05 r) was found to be different during external rotation TAE testing of the overhead athletes (p 5 0.027) but was not found in the control subjects. Post hoc analysis revealed no differences between dominant or nondominant TAE scores when compari- sons were made between overhead athletes and controls. Results may reveal that power of the rotator cuff muscles may not be a critical component of the overhead throwing motion.

  • Postrehabilitation Outcomes of Muscle Power (Torque-Acceleration Energy) in Patients with Selected Shoulder Dysfunctions
    Journal of Sport Rehabilitation, 2003
    Co-Authors: Robert C. Manske, George J. Davies

    Abstract:

    Context: Most patients on an index concentric isokinetic test of the shoulder internal and external rotators have significant torque-AccelerationEnergy (TAE) deficits. Objective: To assess the effectiveness of rehabilitation on muscle power in patients with shoulder dysfunctions. Design: Prospective, pretest–posttest. Setting: Physical therapy clinic. Participants: 67, mean age 28.7 ± 12.89 years. Main Outcome Measures: Concentric shoulder internal and external rotators measured with arm at 90° of abduction, 90° of elbow flexion. Isokinetic velocities tested: 60°, 180°, and 300°/s. Results: A paired t test (P < .05) compared the differences from index to discharge test for involved and uninvolved internal and external shoulder rotators. Percentages of TAE deficits involved vs uninvolved on discharge and change in TAE from index to discharge were also analyzed. Significant improvement of the involved shoulder for all velocities for both internal and external rotators was seen. The uninvolved extremity saw...

Todd S. Ellenbecker – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Difference in isokinetic torque Acceleration Energy of the rotator cuff: competitive male pitchers versus male nonathletes
    , 2004
    Co-Authors: Robert C. Manske, Casey S. Tajchman, Todd A. Stranghoner, Todd S. Ellenbecker

    Abstract:

    The full text of this article is not available in SOAR. Access this article via EBSCO Host # 14215835

  • Difference in isokinetic torque Acceleration Energy of the rotator cuff: competitive male pitchers versus male nonathletes.
    Journal of strength and conditioning research, 2004
    Co-Authors: Robert C. Manske, Casey S. Tajchman, Todd A. Stranghoner, Todd S. Ellenbecker

    Abstract:

    Manske, R.C., C.S. Tajchman, T.A. Stranghoner, and T.S. Ellenbecker. Difference in isokinetic torque accelera- tion Energy of the rotator cuff: Competitive male pitchers versus male nonathletes. J. Strength Cond. Res. 18(3):447-450. 2004.— Rotator cuff function is critical to the overhead athlete. Rotator cuff power is felt to be important in the overhead athlete during the throwing motion. Little research exists regarding torque ac- celeration Energy (TAE) in overhead athletes. Twenty-five males were divided into 2 groups consisting of overhead athletes (pitch- ers) (n 5 12) and nonoverhead athletes (controls) (n 5 13). All participants were given a concentric velocity spectrum isokinetic test at speeds of 608 (1.05 r), 1808 (3.16 r), and 3008·s21 (5.26 r) to both the dominant and nondominant shoulder internal and external rotators. Significant differences were found for all in- ternal rotator TAE scores (p 5 0.000-0.016), at each of the 3 velocities, when comparing dominant to nondominant arms of both overhead athletes and nonoverhead athletes. Only 608·s 21 (1.05 r) was found to be different during external rotation TAE testing of the overhead athletes (p 5 0.027) but was not found in the control subjects. Post hoc analysis revealed no differences between dominant or nondominant TAE scores when compari- sons were made between overhead athletes and controls. Results may reveal that power of the rotator cuff muscles may not be a critical component of the overhead throwing motion.