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V. Jousseaume – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Catalyst preparation for CMOS-compatible silicon nanowire synthesis
    Nature Nanotechnology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Vincent T. Renard, M. Jublot, P. Gergaud, P. Cherns, D. Rouchon, A. Chabli, V. Jousseaume

    Abstract:

    A chemical synthesis of a copper-based catalyst allows the synthesis of silicon nanowires to be compatible with standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) fabrication processes. Metallic contamination was key to the discovery of semiconductor nanowires^ 1 , but today it stands in the way of their adoption by the semiconductor industry. This is because many of the metallic catalysts required for nanowire growth are not compatible with standard CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) fabrication processes. Nanowire synthesis with those metals that are CMOS compatible, such as aluminium^ 2 and copper^ 3 , 4 , 5 , necessitate temperatures higher than 450 °C, which is the maximum temperature allowed in CMOS processing. Here, we demonstrate that the synthesis temperature of silicon nanowires using copper-based catalysts is limited by catalyst preparation. We show that the appropriate catalyst can be produced by chemical means at temperatures as low as 400 °C. This is achieved by oxidizing the catalyst precursor, contradicting the Accepted Wisdom that oxygen prevents metal-catalysed nanowire growth. By simultaneously solving material compatibility and temperature issues, this catalyst synthesis could represent an important step towards real-world applications of semiconductor nanowires^ 6 , 7 , 8 , 9 , 10 , 11 .

  • Catalyst preparation for CMOS-compatible silicon nanowire synthesis
    Nature Nanotechnology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Vincent Renard, M. Jublot, P. Gergaud, P. Cherns, D. Rouchon, A. Chabli, V. Jousseaume

    Abstract:

    Metallic contamination was key to the discovery of semiconductor nanowires, but today it stands in the way of their adoption by the semiconductor industry. This is because many of the metallic catalysts required for nanowire growth are not compatible with standard CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) fabrication processes. Nanowire synthesis with those metals which are CMOS compatible, such as aluminium and copper, necessitate temperatures higher than 450 C, which is the maximum temperature allowed in CMOS processing. Here, we demonstrate that the synthesis temperature of silicon nanowires using copper based catalysts is limited by catalyst preparation. We show that the appropriate catalyst can be produced by chemical means at temperatures as low as 400 C. This is achieved by oxidizing the catalyst precursor, contradicting the Accepted Wisdom that oxygen prevents metal-catalyzed nanowire growth. By simultaneously solving material compatibility and temperature issues, this catalyst synthesis could represent an important step towards real-world applications of semiconductor nanowires.

A. Chabli – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Catalyst preparation for CMOS-compatible silicon nanowire synthesis
    Nature Nanotechnology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Vincent T. Renard, M. Jublot, P. Gergaud, P. Cherns, D. Rouchon, A. Chabli, V. Jousseaume

    Abstract:

    A chemical synthesis of a copper-based catalyst allows the synthesis of silicon nanowires to be compatible with standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) fabrication processes. Metallic contamination was key to the discovery of semiconductor nanowires^ 1 , but today it stands in the way of their adoption by the semiconductor industry. This is because many of the metallic catalysts required for nanowire growth are not compatible with standard CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) fabrication processes. Nanowire synthesis with those metals that are CMOS compatible, such as aluminium^ 2 and copper^ 3 , 4 , 5 , necessitate temperatures higher than 450 °C, which is the maximum temperature allowed in CMOS processing. Here, we demonstrate that the synthesis temperature of silicon nanowires using copper-based catalysts is limited by catalyst preparation. We show that the appropriate catalyst can be produced by chemical means at temperatures as low as 400 °C. This is achieved by oxidizing the catalyst precursor, contradicting the Accepted Wisdom that oxygen prevents metal-catalysed nanowire growth. By simultaneously solving material compatibility and temperature issues, this catalyst synthesis could represent an important step towards real-world applications of semiconductor nanowires^ 6 , 7 , 8 , 9 , 10 , 11 .

  • Catalyst preparation for CMOS-compatible silicon nanowire synthesis
    Nature Nanotechnology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Vincent Renard, M. Jublot, P. Gergaud, P. Cherns, D. Rouchon, A. Chabli, V. Jousseaume

    Abstract:

    Metallic contamination was key to the discovery of semiconductor nanowires, but today it stands in the way of their adoption by the semiconductor industry. This is because many of the metallic catalysts required for nanowire growth are not compatible with standard CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) fabrication processes. Nanowire synthesis with those metals which are CMOS compatible, such as aluminium and copper, necessitate temperatures higher than 450 C, which is the maximum temperature allowed in CMOS processing. Here, we demonstrate that the synthesis temperature of silicon nanowires using copper based catalysts is limited by catalyst preparation. We show that the appropriate catalyst can be produced by chemical means at temperatures as low as 400 C. This is achieved by oxidizing the catalyst precursor, contradicting the Accepted Wisdom that oxygen prevents metal-catalyzed nanowire growth. By simultaneously solving material compatibility and temperature issues, this catalyst synthesis could represent an important step towards real-world applications of semiconductor nanowires.

D. Rouchon – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Catalyst preparation for CMOS-compatible silicon nanowire synthesis
    Nature Nanotechnology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Vincent T. Renard, M. Jublot, P. Gergaud, P. Cherns, D. Rouchon, A. Chabli, V. Jousseaume

    Abstract:

    A chemical synthesis of a copper-based catalyst allows the synthesis of silicon nanowires to be compatible with standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) fabrication processes. Metallic contamination was key to the discovery of semiconductor nanowires^ 1 , but today it stands in the way of their adoption by the semiconductor industry. This is because many of the metallic catalysts required for nanowire growth are not compatible with standard CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) fabrication processes. Nanowire synthesis with those metals that are CMOS compatible, such as aluminium^ 2 and copper^ 3 , 4 , 5 , necessitate temperatures higher than 450 °C, which is the maximum temperature allowed in CMOS processing. Here, we demonstrate that the synthesis temperature of silicon nanowires using copper-based catalysts is limited by catalyst preparation. We show that the appropriate catalyst can be produced by chemical means at temperatures as low as 400 °C. This is achieved by oxidizing the catalyst precursor, contradicting the Accepted Wisdom that oxygen prevents metal-catalysed nanowire growth. By simultaneously solving material compatibility and temperature issues, this catalyst synthesis could represent an important step towards real-world applications of semiconductor nanowires^ 6 , 7 , 8 , 9 , 10 , 11 .

  • Catalyst preparation for CMOS-compatible silicon nanowire synthesis
    Nature Nanotechnology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Vincent Renard, M. Jublot, P. Gergaud, P. Cherns, D. Rouchon, A. Chabli, V. Jousseaume

    Abstract:

    Metallic contamination was key to the discovery of semiconductor nanowires, but today it stands in the way of their adoption by the semiconductor industry. This is because many of the metallic catalysts required for nanowire growth are not compatible with standard CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) fabrication processes. Nanowire synthesis with those metals which are CMOS compatible, such as aluminium and copper, necessitate temperatures higher than 450 C, which is the maximum temperature allowed in CMOS processing. Here, we demonstrate that the synthesis temperature of silicon nanowires using copper based catalysts is limited by catalyst preparation. We show that the appropriate catalyst can be produced by chemical means at temperatures as low as 400 C. This is achieved by oxidizing the catalyst precursor, contradicting the Accepted Wisdom that oxygen prevents metal-catalyzed nanowire growth. By simultaneously solving material compatibility and temperature issues, this catalyst synthesis could represent an important step towards real-world applications of semiconductor nanowires.