Accident Risk - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Accident Risk

The Experts below are selected from a list of 327 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Accident Risk – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Robert J. Pierce – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • sleepiness sleep disordered breathing and Accident Risk factors in commercial vehicle drivers
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 2004
    Co-Authors: Mark E Howard, Anup V Desai, Ronald R. Grunstein, Craig Hukins, John G Armstrong, Denise Joffe, Philip Swann, Donald Alexander Campbell, Robert J. Pierce
    Abstract:

    Sleep-disordered breathing and excessive sleepiness may be more common in commercial vehicle drivers than in the general population. The relative importance of factors causing excessive sleepiness and Accidents in this population remains unclear. We measured the prevalence of excessive sleepiness and sleep-disordered breathing and assessed Accident Risk factors in 2,342 respondents to a questionnaire distributed to a random sample of 3,268 Australian commercial vehicle drivers and another 161 drivers among 244 invited to undergo polysomnography. More than half (59.6%) of drivers had sleep-disordered breathing and 15.8% had obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Twenty-four percent of drivers had excessive sleepiness. Increasing sleepiness was related to an increased Accident Risk. The sleepiest 5% of drivers on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire had an increased Risk of an Accident (odds ratio [OR] 1.91, p = 0.02 and OR 2.23, p < 0.01, respectively) and multiple acciden...

  • sleepiness sleep disordered breathing and Accident Risk factors in commercial vehicle drivers
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 2004
    Co-Authors: Mark E Howard, Anup V Desai, Ronald R. Grunstein, Craig Hukins, John G Armstrong, Philip Swann, D Campbell, David Joffe, Robert J. Pierce
    Abstract:

    Sleep-disordered breathing and excessive sleepiness may be more common in commercial vehicle drivers than in the general population. The relative importance of factors causing excessive sleepiness and Accidents in this population remains unclear. We measured the prevalence of excessive sleepiness and sleep-disordered breathing and assessed Accident Risk factors in 2,342 respondents to a questionnaire distributed to a random sample of 3,268 Australian commercial vehicle drivers and another 161 drivers among 244 invited to undergo polysomnography. More than half (59.6%) of drivers had sleep-disordered breathing and 15.8% had obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Twenty-four percent of drivers had excessive sleepiness. Increasing sleepiness was related to an increased Accident Risk. The sleepiest 5% of drivers on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire had an increased Risk of an Accident (odds ratio [OR] 1.91, p = 0.02 and OR 2.23, p < 0.01, respectively) and multiple Accidents (OR 2.67, p < 0.01 and OR 2.39, p = 0.01), adjusted for established Risk factors. There was an increased Accident Risk with narcotic analgesic use (OR 2.40, p < 0.01) and antihistamine use (OR 3.44, p = 0.04). Chronic excessive sleepiness and sleep-disordered breathing are common in Australian commercial vehicle drivers. Accident Risk was related to increasing chronic sleepiness and antihistamine and narcotic analgesic use.

Mark E Howard – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • sleepiness sleep disordered breathing and Accident Risk factors in commercial vehicle drivers
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 2004
    Co-Authors: Mark E Howard, Anup V Desai, Ronald R. Grunstein, Craig Hukins, John G Armstrong, Denise Joffe, Philip Swann, Donald Alexander Campbell, Robert J. Pierce
    Abstract:

    Sleep-disordered breathing and excessive sleepiness may be more common in commercial vehicle drivers than in the general population. The relative importance of factors causing excessive sleepiness and Accidents in this population remains unclear. We measured the prevalence of excessive sleepiness and sleep-disordered breathing and assessed Accident Risk factors in 2,342 respondents to a questionnaire distributed to a random sample of 3,268 Australian commercial vehicle drivers and another 161 drivers among 244 invited to undergo polysomnography. More than half (59.6%) of drivers had sleep-disordered breathing and 15.8% had obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Twenty-four percent of drivers had excessive sleepiness. Increasing sleepiness was related to an increased Accident Risk. The sleepiest 5% of drivers on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire had an increased Risk of an Accident (odds ratio [OR] 1.91, p = 0.02 and OR 2.23, p < 0.01, respectively) and multiple acciden...

  • sleepiness sleep disordered breathing and Accident Risk factors in commercial vehicle drivers
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 2004
    Co-Authors: Mark E Howard, Anup V Desai, Ronald R. Grunstein, Craig Hukins, John G Armstrong, Philip Swann, D Campbell, David Joffe, Robert J. Pierce
    Abstract:

    Sleep-disordered breathing and excessive sleepiness may be more common in commercial vehicle drivers than in the general population. The relative importance of factors causing excessive sleepiness and Accidents in this population remains unclear. We measured the prevalence of excessive sleepiness and sleep-disordered breathing and assessed Accident Risk factors in 2,342 respondents to a questionnaire distributed to a random sample of 3,268 Australian commercial vehicle drivers and another 161 drivers among 244 invited to undergo polysomnography. More than half (59.6%) of drivers had sleep-disordered breathing and 15.8% had obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Twenty-four percent of drivers had excessive sleepiness. Increasing sleepiness was related to an increased Accident Risk. The sleepiest 5% of drivers on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire had an increased Risk of an Accident (odds ratio [OR] 1.91, p = 0.02 and OR 2.23, p < 0.01, respectively) and multiple Accidents (OR 2.67, p < 0.01 and OR 2.39, p = 0.01), adjusted for established Risk factors. There was an increased Accident Risk with narcotic analgesic use (OR 2.40, p < 0.01) and antihistamine use (OR 3.44, p = 0.04). Chronic excessive sleepiness and sleep-disordered breathing are common in Australian commercial vehicle drivers. Accident Risk was related to increasing chronic sleepiness and antihistamine and narcotic analgesic use.

Ronald R. Grunstein – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • sleepiness sleep disordered breathing and Accident Risk factors in commercial vehicle drivers
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 2004
    Co-Authors: Mark E Howard, Anup V Desai, Ronald R. Grunstein, Craig Hukins, John G Armstrong, Denise Joffe, Philip Swann, Donald Alexander Campbell, Robert J. Pierce
    Abstract:

    Sleep-disordered breathing and excessive sleepiness may be more common in commercial vehicle drivers than in the general population. The relative importance of factors causing excessive sleepiness and Accidents in this population remains unclear. We measured the prevalence of excessive sleepiness and sleep-disordered breathing and assessed Accident Risk factors in 2,342 respondents to a questionnaire distributed to a random sample of 3,268 Australian commercial vehicle drivers and another 161 drivers among 244 invited to undergo polysomnography. More than half (59.6%) of drivers had sleep-disordered breathing and 15.8% had obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Twenty-four percent of drivers had excessive sleepiness. Increasing sleepiness was related to an increased Accident Risk. The sleepiest 5% of drivers on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire had an increased Risk of an Accident (odds ratio [OR] 1.91, p = 0.02 and OR 2.23, p < 0.01, respectively) and multiple acciden...

  • sleepiness sleep disordered breathing and Accident Risk factors in commercial vehicle drivers
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 2004
    Co-Authors: Mark E Howard, Anup V Desai, Ronald R. Grunstein, Craig Hukins, John G Armstrong, Philip Swann, D Campbell, David Joffe, Robert J. Pierce
    Abstract:

    Sleep-disordered breathing and excessive sleepiness may be more common in commercial vehicle drivers than in the general population. The relative importance of factors causing excessive sleepiness and Accidents in this population remains unclear. We measured the prevalence of excessive sleepiness and sleep-disordered breathing and assessed Accident Risk factors in 2,342 respondents to a questionnaire distributed to a random sample of 3,268 Australian commercial vehicle drivers and another 161 drivers among 244 invited to undergo polysomnography. More than half (59.6%) of drivers had sleep-disordered breathing and 15.8% had obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Twenty-four percent of drivers had excessive sleepiness. Increasing sleepiness was related to an increased Accident Risk. The sleepiest 5% of drivers on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire had an increased Risk of an Accident (odds ratio [OR] 1.91, p = 0.02 and OR 2.23, p < 0.01, respectively) and multiple Accidents (OR 2.67, p < 0.01 and OR 2.39, p = 0.01), adjusted for established Risk factors. There was an increased Accident Risk with narcotic analgesic use (OR 2.40, p < 0.01) and antihistamine use (OR 3.44, p = 0.04). Chronic excessive sleepiness and sleep-disordered breathing are common in Australian commercial vehicle drivers. Accident Risk was related to increasing chronic sleepiness and antihistamine and narcotic analgesic use.

  • SLEEPINESS, SLEEP APNEA AND Accident Risk FACTORS IN TRANSPORT DRIVERS
    , 2003
    Co-Authors: M Howard, Ronald R. Grunstein, Craig Hukins, Denise Joffe, Philip Swann, A Desai, J Armstrong, D Campbell, R Pierce
    Abstract:

    Excessive sleepiness and sleep disordered breathing are recognized motor vehicle Accident Risk factors in the general population. The relative importance of factors causing excessive sleepiness and Accidents amongst transport drivers remains unclear. The prevalence of excessive sleepiness and sleep disordered breathing was measured and potential Accident Risk factors were assessed in a cross sectional study of 2342 transport drivers and another 161 drivers who underwent polysomnography. Increasing sleepiness was related to an increased Accident Risk. Those in the highest 5 per cent on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale had an increased Risk of an Accident and multiple Accidents. In the large sample of transport drivers, excessive sleepiness and sleep disordered breathing were common. There was an increased Accident Risk with increasing sleepiness, antihistamine and narcotic analgesic use. Awareness of the Risks of medications and interventions that reduce sleepiness in drivers may help to prevent Accidents. (a) For the covering entry of this conference, please see ITRD abstract no. E210298.

Philip Swann – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • sleepiness sleep disordered breathing and Accident Risk factors in commercial vehicle drivers
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 2004
    Co-Authors: Mark E Howard, Anup V Desai, Ronald R. Grunstein, Craig Hukins, John G Armstrong, Denise Joffe, Philip Swann, Donald Alexander Campbell, Robert J. Pierce
    Abstract:

    Sleep-disordered breathing and excessive sleepiness may be more common in commercial vehicle drivers than in the general population. The relative importance of factors causing excessive sleepiness and Accidents in this population remains unclear. We measured the prevalence of excessive sleepiness and sleep-disordered breathing and assessed Accident Risk factors in 2,342 respondents to a questionnaire distributed to a random sample of 3,268 Australian commercial vehicle drivers and another 161 drivers among 244 invited to undergo polysomnography. More than half (59.6%) of drivers had sleep-disordered breathing and 15.8% had obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Twenty-four percent of drivers had excessive sleepiness. Increasing sleepiness was related to an increased Accident Risk. The sleepiest 5% of drivers on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire had an increased Risk of an Accident (odds ratio [OR] 1.91, p = 0.02 and OR 2.23, p < 0.01, respectively) and multiple acciden...

  • sleepiness sleep disordered breathing and Accident Risk factors in commercial vehicle drivers
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 2004
    Co-Authors: Mark E Howard, Anup V Desai, Ronald R. Grunstein, Craig Hukins, John G Armstrong, Philip Swann, D Campbell, David Joffe, Robert J. Pierce
    Abstract:

    Sleep-disordered breathing and excessive sleepiness may be more common in commercial vehicle drivers than in the general population. The relative importance of factors causing excessive sleepiness and Accidents in this population remains unclear. We measured the prevalence of excessive sleepiness and sleep-disordered breathing and assessed Accident Risk factors in 2,342 respondents to a questionnaire distributed to a random sample of 3,268 Australian commercial vehicle drivers and another 161 drivers among 244 invited to undergo polysomnography. More than half (59.6%) of drivers had sleep-disordered breathing and 15.8% had obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Twenty-four percent of drivers had excessive sleepiness. Increasing sleepiness was related to an increased Accident Risk. The sleepiest 5% of drivers on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire had an increased Risk of an Accident (odds ratio [OR] 1.91, p = 0.02 and OR 2.23, p < 0.01, respectively) and multiple Accidents (OR 2.67, p < 0.01 and OR 2.39, p = 0.01), adjusted for established Risk factors. There was an increased Accident Risk with narcotic analgesic use (OR 2.40, p < 0.01) and antihistamine use (OR 3.44, p = 0.04). Chronic excessive sleepiness and sleep-disordered breathing are common in Australian commercial vehicle drivers. Accident Risk was related to increasing chronic sleepiness and antihistamine and narcotic analgesic use.

  • SLEEPINESS, SLEEP APNEA AND Accident Risk FACTORS IN TRANSPORT DRIVERS
    , 2003
    Co-Authors: M Howard, Ronald R. Grunstein, Craig Hukins, Denise Joffe, Philip Swann, A Desai, J Armstrong, D Campbell, R Pierce
    Abstract:

    Excessive sleepiness and sleep disordered breathing are recognized motor vehicle Accident Risk factors in the general population. The relative importance of factors causing excessive sleepiness and Accidents amongst transport drivers remains unclear. The prevalence of excessive sleepiness and sleep disordered breathing was measured and potential Accident Risk factors were assessed in a cross sectional study of 2342 transport drivers and another 161 drivers who underwent polysomnography. Increasing sleepiness was related to an increased Accident Risk. Those in the highest 5 per cent on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale had an increased Risk of an Accident and multiple Accidents. In the large sample of transport drivers, excessive sleepiness and sleep disordered breathing were common. There was an increased Accident Risk with increasing sleepiness, antihistamine and narcotic analgesic use. Awareness of the Risks of medications and interventions that reduce sleepiness in drivers may help to prevent Accidents. (a) For the covering entry of this conference, please see ITRD abstract no. E210298.

Craig Hukins – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • sleepiness sleep disordered breathing and Accident Risk factors in commercial vehicle drivers
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 2004
    Co-Authors: Mark E Howard, Anup V Desai, Ronald R. Grunstein, Craig Hukins, John G Armstrong, Denise Joffe, Philip Swann, Donald Alexander Campbell, Robert J. Pierce
    Abstract:

    Sleep-disordered breathing and excessive sleepiness may be more common in commercial vehicle drivers than in the general population. The relative importance of factors causing excessive sleepiness and Accidents in this population remains unclear. We measured the prevalence of excessive sleepiness and sleep-disordered breathing and assessed Accident Risk factors in 2,342 respondents to a questionnaire distributed to a random sample of 3,268 Australian commercial vehicle drivers and another 161 drivers among 244 invited to undergo polysomnography. More than half (59.6%) of drivers had sleep-disordered breathing and 15.8% had obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Twenty-four percent of drivers had excessive sleepiness. Increasing sleepiness was related to an increased Accident Risk. The sleepiest 5% of drivers on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire had an increased Risk of an Accident (odds ratio [OR] 1.91, p = 0.02 and OR 2.23, p < 0.01, respectively) and multiple acciden...

  • sleepiness sleep disordered breathing and Accident Risk factors in commercial vehicle drivers
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 2004
    Co-Authors: Mark E Howard, Anup V Desai, Ronald R. Grunstein, Craig Hukins, John G Armstrong, Philip Swann, D Campbell, David Joffe, Robert J. Pierce
    Abstract:

    Sleep-disordered breathing and excessive sleepiness may be more common in commercial vehicle drivers than in the general population. The relative importance of factors causing excessive sleepiness and Accidents in this population remains unclear. We measured the prevalence of excessive sleepiness and sleep-disordered breathing and assessed Accident Risk factors in 2,342 respondents to a questionnaire distributed to a random sample of 3,268 Australian commercial vehicle drivers and another 161 drivers among 244 invited to undergo polysomnography. More than half (59.6%) of drivers had sleep-disordered breathing and 15.8% had obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Twenty-four percent of drivers had excessive sleepiness. Increasing sleepiness was related to an increased Accident Risk. The sleepiest 5% of drivers on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire had an increased Risk of an Accident (odds ratio [OR] 1.91, p = 0.02 and OR 2.23, p < 0.01, respectively) and multiple Accidents (OR 2.67, p < 0.01 and OR 2.39, p = 0.01), adjusted for established Risk factors. There was an increased Accident Risk with narcotic analgesic use (OR 2.40, p < 0.01) and antihistamine use (OR 3.44, p = 0.04). Chronic excessive sleepiness and sleep-disordered breathing are common in Australian commercial vehicle drivers. Accident Risk was related to increasing chronic sleepiness and antihistamine and narcotic analgesic use.

  • SLEEPINESS, SLEEP APNEA AND Accident Risk FACTORS IN TRANSPORT DRIVERS
    , 2003
    Co-Authors: M Howard, Ronald R. Grunstein, Craig Hukins, Denise Joffe, Philip Swann, A Desai, J Armstrong, D Campbell, R Pierce
    Abstract:

    Excessive sleepiness and sleep disordered breathing are recognized motor vehicle Accident Risk factors in the general population. The relative importance of factors causing excessive sleepiness and Accidents amongst transport drivers remains unclear. The prevalence of excessive sleepiness and sleep disordered breathing was measured and potential Accident Risk factors were assessed in a cross sectional study of 2342 transport drivers and another 161 drivers who underwent polysomnography. Increasing sleepiness was related to an increased Accident Risk. Those in the highest 5 per cent on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale had an increased Risk of an Accident and multiple Accidents. In the large sample of transport drivers, excessive sleepiness and sleep disordered breathing were common. There was an increased Accident Risk with increasing sleepiness, antihistamine and narcotic analgesic use. Awareness of the Risks of medications and interventions that reduce sleepiness in drivers may help to prevent Accidents. (a) For the covering entry of this conference, please see ITRD abstract no. E210298.