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Acculturation

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Dina Birman – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The Effect of Ethnic Community on Acculturation and Cultural Adaptation: the Case of Russian-Speaking Older Adults
    Journal of International Migration and Integration, 2019
    Co-Authors: Andrey Vinokurov, Edison J Trickett, Dina Birman

    Abstract:

    The study examined community influences on Acculturation, social integration, and cultural adaptation among elderly Russian-speaking immigrants residing in two communities with different ethnic density. Results revealed direct, indirect, and moderation effects of community. The residents of the dense ethnic community had lower American social support and American Acculturation than residents of the dispersed community. Both communities had comparable levels of acculturative stress and American cultural alienation, underscoring an indirect effect of community on cultural adaptation via Acculturation and social support. The ethnic community also moderated relationships of Acculturation and social support to cultural adaptation, suggesting their varied adaptive and maladaptive pathways. American Acculturation was associated with increased acculturative stress in the dense community and reduced acculturative stress in the dispersed community. Russian Acculturation and social support were typically adaptive in the dense community and maladaptive in the dispersed community. The study supported the Ecological Acculturative Frameworkxcopy (EAF) that underscores the importance of conceptualizing Acculturation as embedded within the community sociocultural context that reflects the lived experiences of individuals interacting with their contextual settings, and empirically examining adaptive and maladaptive pathways provided by these settings.

  • A Tale of Two Cities: Replication of a Study on the Acculturation and Adaptation of Immigrant Adolescents From the Former Soviet Union in a Different Community Context
    American Journal of Community Psychology, 2005
    Co-Authors: Dina Birman, Edison J Trickett, Rebecca M. Buchanan

    Abstract:

    While a great deal of research has been conducted to understand Acculturation and its relationship to adaptation in the new country, surprisingly little attention has been paid to the ways in which the characteristics of the local community impact these processes. The present study addresses this gap in the literature by exploring the potential role of community differences in the Acculturation and adaptation processes of 269 refugee and immigrant adolescents from the former Soviet Union who resettled in two different community contexts. Specifically, a prior study on Acculturation and adjustment among high school students (D. Birman, E. J. Trickett, & A. Vinokurov, 2002) was replicated with the same émigré population in a contrasting community within the same state. The contrast between these communities allowed us to test hypotheses emerging from an ecological perspective concerning (1) patterns of Acculturation, (2) levels of discrimination and its effect on acculturative outcomes, and (3) community differences in the relationship between Acculturation and outcomes. In addition to the focus on community differences, the study also employs a multidimensional measure of Acculturation and assesses Acculturation to both American and Russian culture. Furthermore, adaptation is assessed across different life domains; including peer relationships, family relationships, school adaptation, and psychological adaptation. Findings support the general ecological perspective, suggesting the importance of studying Acculturation and adaptation as a reflexive process in which culture and context are very much intertwined.

  • Acculturation and Adaptation of Soviet Jewish Refugee Adolescents: Predictors of Adjustment Across Life Domains
    American Journal of Community Psychology, 2002
    Co-Authors: Dina Birman, Edison J Trickett, Andrey Vinokurov

    Abstract:

    This study explores how Acculturation is related to adaptation across different life spheres for 162 Soviet Jewish refugee adolescents in a suburban community in Maryland. Because the different contexts of refugee adolescents’ lives vary in acculturative demands, different patterns of Acculturation should be related to adaptation in different life spheres. The study uses a multidimensional measure of Acculturation and assesses Acculturation to both American and Russian cultures as it relates to psychological adaptation, peer relations, and school and family outcomes. Findings support the general ecological thesis that Acculturation to different cultures is differentially related to adaptation across life domains. Acculturation to American culture predicted better grades and perceived support from American peers. Acculturation to Russian culture predicted perceived support from Russian peers. Both American Acculturation and Russian Acculturation predicted reduced loneliness and perceived support from parents. Further, different dimensions of Acculturation, such as language and identity, were differentially related to adaptation. Implications for Acculturation theory and measurement are drawn, and cautions are offered about the interpretation of Acculturation studies using single proxies such as language use or preference.

Edison J Trickett – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The Effect of Ethnic Community on Acculturation and Cultural Adaptation: the Case of Russian-Speaking Older Adults
    Journal of International Migration and Integration, 2019
    Co-Authors: Andrey Vinokurov, Edison J Trickett, Dina Birman

    Abstract:

    The study examined community influences on Acculturation, social integration, and cultural adaptation among elderly Russian-speaking immigrants residing in two communities with different ethnic density. Results revealed direct, indirect, and moderation effects of community. The residents of the dense ethnic community had lower American social support and American Acculturation than residents of the dispersed community. Both communities had comparable levels of acculturative stress and American cultural alienation, underscoring an indirect effect of community on cultural adaptation via Acculturation and social support. The ethnic community also moderated relationships of Acculturation and social support to cultural adaptation, suggesting their varied adaptive and maladaptive pathways. American Acculturation was associated with increased acculturative stress in the dense community and reduced acculturative stress in the dispersed community. Russian Acculturation and social support were typically adaptive in the dense community and maladaptive in the dispersed community. The study supported the Ecological Acculturative Frameworkxcopy (EAF) that underscores the importance of conceptualizing Acculturation as embedded within the community sociocultural context that reflects the lived experiences of individuals interacting with their contextual settings, and empirically examining adaptive and maladaptive pathways provided by these settings.

  • A Tale of Two Cities: Replication of a Study on the Acculturation and Adaptation of Immigrant Adolescents From the Former Soviet Union in a Different Community Context
    American Journal of Community Psychology, 2005
    Co-Authors: Dina Birman, Edison J Trickett, Rebecca M. Buchanan

    Abstract:

    While a great deal of research has been conducted to understand Acculturation and its relationship to adaptation in the new country, surprisingly little attention has been paid to the ways in which the characteristics of the local community impact these processes. The present study addresses this gap in the literature by exploring the potential role of community differences in the Acculturation and adaptation processes of 269 refugee and immigrant adolescents from the former Soviet Union who resettled in two different community contexts. Specifically, a prior study on Acculturation and adjustment among high school students (D. Birman, E. J. Trickett, & A. Vinokurov, 2002) was replicated with the same émigré population in a contrasting community within the same state. The contrast between these communities allowed us to test hypotheses emerging from an ecological perspective concerning (1) patterns of Acculturation, (2) levels of discrimination and its effect on acculturative outcomes, and (3) community differences in the relationship between Acculturation and outcomes. In addition to the focus on community differences, the study also employs a multidimensional measure of Acculturation and assesses Acculturation to both American and Russian culture. Furthermore, adaptation is assessed across different life domains; including peer relationships, family relationships, school adaptation, and psychological adaptation. Findings support the general ecological perspective, suggesting the importance of studying Acculturation and adaptation as a reflexive process in which culture and context are very much intertwined.

  • Acculturation and Adaptation of Soviet Jewish Refugee Adolescents: Predictors of Adjustment Across Life Domains
    American Journal of Community Psychology, 2002
    Co-Authors: Dina Birman, Edison J Trickett, Andrey Vinokurov

    Abstract:

    This study explores how Acculturation is related to adaptation across different life spheres for 162 Soviet Jewish refugee adolescents in a suburban community in Maryland. Because the different contexts of refugee adolescents’ lives vary in acculturative demands, different patterns of Acculturation should be related to adaptation in different life spheres. The study uses a multidimensional measure of Acculturation and assesses Acculturation to both American and Russian cultures as it relates to psychological adaptation, peer relations, and school and family outcomes. Findings support the general ecological thesis that Acculturation to different cultures is differentially related to adaptation across life domains. Acculturation to American culture predicted better grades and perceived support from American peers. Acculturation to Russian culture predicted perceived support from Russian peers. Both American Acculturation and Russian Acculturation predicted reduced loneliness and perceived support from parents. Further, different dimensions of Acculturation, such as language and identity, were differentially related to adaptation. Implications for Acculturation theory and measurement are drawn, and cautions are offered about the interpretation of Acculturation studies using single proxies such as language use or preference.

Andrey Vinokurov – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The Effect of Ethnic Community on Acculturation and Cultural Adaptation: the Case of Russian-Speaking Older Adults
    Journal of International Migration and Integration, 2019
    Co-Authors: Andrey Vinokurov, Edison J Trickett, Dina Birman

    Abstract:

    The study examined community influences on Acculturation, social integration, and cultural adaptation among elderly Russian-speaking immigrants residing in two communities with different ethnic density. Results revealed direct, indirect, and moderation effects of community. The residents of the dense ethnic community had lower American social support and American Acculturation than residents of the dispersed community. Both communities had comparable levels of acculturative stress and American cultural alienation, underscoring an indirect effect of community on cultural adaptation via Acculturation and social support. The ethnic community also moderated relationships of Acculturation and social support to cultural adaptation, suggesting their varied adaptive and maladaptive pathways. American Acculturation was associated with increased acculturative stress in the dense community and reduced acculturative stress in the dispersed community. Russian Acculturation and social support were typically adaptive in the dense community and maladaptive in the dispersed community. The study supported the Ecological Acculturative Frameworkxcopy (EAF) that underscores the importance of conceptualizing Acculturation as embedded within the community sociocultural context that reflects the lived experiences of individuals interacting with their contextual settings, and empirically examining adaptive and maladaptive pathways provided by these settings.

  • Acculturation and Adaptation of Soviet Jewish Refugee Adolescents: Predictors of Adjustment Across Life Domains
    American Journal of Community Psychology, 2002
    Co-Authors: Dina Birman, Edison J Trickett, Andrey Vinokurov

    Abstract:

    This study explores how Acculturation is related to adaptation across different life spheres for 162 Soviet Jewish refugee adolescents in a suburban community in Maryland. Because the different contexts of refugee adolescents’ lives vary in acculturative demands, different patterns of Acculturation should be related to adaptation in different life spheres. The study uses a multidimensional measure of Acculturation and assesses Acculturation to both American and Russian cultures as it relates to psychological adaptation, peer relations, and school and family outcomes. Findings support the general ecological thesis that Acculturation to different cultures is differentially related to adaptation across life domains. Acculturation to American culture predicted better grades and perceived support from American peers. Acculturation to Russian culture predicted perceived support from Russian peers. Both American Acculturation and Russian Acculturation predicted reduced loneliness and perceived support from parents. Further, different dimensions of Acculturation, such as language and identity, were differentially related to adaptation. Implications for Acculturation theory and measurement are drawn, and cautions are offered about the interpretation of Acculturation studies using single proxies such as language use or preference.