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Accuracy-Error

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Tian Huang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • a general approach for error modeling of machine tools
    International Journal of Machine Tools & Manufacture, 2014
    Co-Authors: Wenjie Tian, Tian Huang, Weiguo Gao, Dawei Zhang
    Abstract:

    Abstract This paper presents a general and systematic approach for geometric error modeling of machine tools due to the geometric errors arising from manufacturing and assembly. The approach can be implemented in three steps: (1) development of a linear map between the pose error twist and source errors within machine tool kinematic chains using homogeneous transformation matrix method; (2) formulation of a linear map between the pose error twist and the error intensities of a machine tool; (3) combination of these two models for error separation. The merit of this approach lies in that it enables the source errors affecting the compensatable and uncompensatable pose accuracy of the machine tool to be explicitly separated, thereby providing designers and/or field engineers with an informative guideline for the accuracy improvement by suitable measures, i.e. component tolerancing in design, manufacturing and assembly processes, and error compensation. Two typical multi-axis machine tools are taken as examples to illustrate the generality and effectiveness of this approach.

Ion Lopez-de-heredia – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Strategies implementation to reduce medicine preparation error rate in neonatal intensive care units.
    European journal of pediatrics, 2015
    Co-Authors: Ainara Campino, Elena Santesteban, Pilar Pascual, Beatriz Sordo, Casilda Arranz, Maria Unceta, Ion Lopez-de-heredia
    Abstract:

    This study assessed the rate of errors in intravenous medicine preparation at bedside in neonatal intensive care units versus preparation error rate in a hospital pharmacy service before and after several strategies were implemented. We performed a prospective observational study during 2013-2015. Ten Spanish neonatal intensive care units and one hospital pharmacy service participated in the study. Two types of preparation errors were considered, calculation errors and accuracy errors. The study was carried out over three consecutive phases: (1) pre-intervention phase, when medicine preparation samples were collected from neonatal intensive care units and hospital pharmacy service according to their normal clinical practice; (2) intervention phase, when protocol standardisation and educational strategy took place; and (3) post-intervention phase, when new medicine samples were collected after strategy implementation. In neonatal intensive care units, 1.35 % of samples registered calculation errors in pre-intervention phase; no calculation errors were registered in hospital pharmacy service samples. In post-intervention phase, no calculation errors were registered in either group. Accuracy error rate decreased both in neonatal intensive care units (54.7 vs 23 %) and hospital pharmacy service (38.3 vs 14.6 %). Calculation errors can disappear with good standardisation protocols. Decrease in accuracy error depends on good preparation technique and environmental factors. • Medication use is associated with a risk of errors and adverse events. Medication errors are more frequent and have more severe consequences in paediatric patients. • Lack of commercial drug formulations adapted to newborn infants makes medicine preparation process more prone to error. What is New: • Calculation errors are minimising using concentration standard protocols. Preparation rules are essential to ensure the accuracy process. • Environmental conditions affect the accuracy process.

  • Medicine preparation errors in ten Spanish neonatal intensive care units.
    European journal of pediatrics, 2015
    Co-Authors: Ainara Campino, Ion Lopez-de-heredia, Pilar Pascual, Beatriz Sordo, Casilda Arranz, Maria Unceta, Miguel Rueda, Elena Santesteban
    Abstract:

    This study assessed the rate of errors in intravenous medicine preparation at the bedside in neonatal intensive care units vs the preparation error rate in a hospital pharmacy service. We conducted a prospective observational study between June and September 2013. Ten Spanish neonatal intensive care units and one hospital pharmacy service participated in the study. Two types of preparation errors were considered: calculation errors and accuracy errors. A total of 522 samples were collected: 238 of vancomycin, 139 of gentamicin, 39 of phenobarbital and 88 of caffeine citrate preparations. Of these, 444 samples were collected by nurses in neonatal intensive care units, and 60 were provided by the hospital pharmacy service. Overall, 18 samples were excluded from the analysis. We detected calculation errors in 6/444 (1.35%) and accuracy errors in 243/444 (54.7%) samples from the neonatal intensive care units. In contrast, in samples from the hospital pharmacy service, no calculation errors were detected, but there were accuracy errors in 23/60 (38.3%) samples. While calculation errors can be eliminated using protocols based on standard drug concentrations, accuracy error rates depend on several variables that affect both neonatal intensive care units and hospital pharmacy services. Medication use is associated with a risk of errors and adverse events. Medication errors are more frequent and have more severe consequences in paediatric patients. Lack of knowledge of drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in relation to physiological immaturity makes neonates more vulnerable to medication errors. Calculation errors are avoided using concentration standard preparation protocols. Accuracy in the preparation process depends mainly on the degree to which commercial drug preparations meet current legal requirements and the syringes and preparation techniques used.

Elena Santesteban – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Strategies implementation to reduce medicine preparation error rate in neonatal intensive care units.
    European journal of pediatrics, 2015
    Co-Authors: Ainara Campino, Elena Santesteban, Pilar Pascual, Beatriz Sordo, Casilda Arranz, Maria Unceta, Ion Lopez-de-heredia
    Abstract:

    This study assessed the rate of errors in intravenous medicine preparation at bedside in neonatal intensive care units versus preparation error rate in a hospital pharmacy service before and after several strategies were implemented. We performed a prospective observational study during 2013-2015. Ten Spanish neonatal intensive care units and one hospital pharmacy service participated in the study. Two types of preparation errors were considered, calculation errors and accuracy errors. The study was carried out over three consecutive phases: (1) pre-intervention phase, when medicine preparation samples were collected from neonatal intensive care units and hospital pharmacy service according to their normal clinical practice; (2) intervention phase, when protocol standardisation and educational strategy took place; and (3) post-intervention phase, when new medicine samples were collected after strategy implementation. In neonatal intensive care units, 1.35 % of samples registered calculation errors in pre-intervention phase; no calculation errors were registered in hospital pharmacy service samples. In post-intervention phase, no calculation errors were registered in either group. Accuracy error rate decreased both in neonatal intensive care units (54.7 vs 23 %) and hospital pharmacy service (38.3 vs 14.6 %). Calculation errors can disappear with good standardisation protocols. Decrease in accuracy error depends on good preparation technique and environmental factors. • Medication use is associated with a risk of errors and adverse events. Medication errors are more frequent and have more severe consequences in paediatric patients. • Lack of commercial drug formulations adapted to newborn infants makes medicine preparation process more prone to error. What is New: • Calculation errors are minimising using concentration standard protocols. Preparation rules are essential to ensure the accuracy process. • Environmental conditions affect the accuracy process.

  • Medicine preparation errors in ten Spanish neonatal intensive care units.
    European journal of pediatrics, 2015
    Co-Authors: Ainara Campino, Ion Lopez-de-heredia, Pilar Pascual, Beatriz Sordo, Casilda Arranz, Maria Unceta, Miguel Rueda, Elena Santesteban
    Abstract:

    This study assessed the rate of errors in intravenous medicine preparation at the bedside in neonatal intensive care units vs the preparation error rate in a hospital pharmacy service. We conducted a prospective observational study between June and September 2013. Ten Spanish neonatal intensive care units and one hospital pharmacy service participated in the study. Two types of preparation errors were considered: calculation errors and accuracy errors. A total of 522 samples were collected: 238 of vancomycin, 139 of gentamicin, 39 of phenobarbital and 88 of caffeine citrate preparations. Of these, 444 samples were collected by nurses in neonatal intensive care units, and 60 were provided by the hospital pharmacy service. Overall, 18 samples were excluded from the analysis. We detected calculation errors in 6/444 (1.35%) and accuracy errors in 243/444 (54.7%) samples from the neonatal intensive care units. In contrast, in samples from the hospital pharmacy service, no calculation errors were detected, but there were accuracy errors in 23/60 (38.3%) samples. While calculation errors can be eliminated using protocols based on standard drug concentrations, accuracy error rates depend on several variables that affect both neonatal intensive care units and hospital pharmacy services. Medication use is associated with a risk of errors and adverse events. Medication errors are more frequent and have more severe consequences in paediatric patients. Lack of knowledge of drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in relation to physiological immaturity makes neonates more vulnerable to medication errors. Calculation errors are avoided using concentration standard preparation protocols. Accuracy in the preparation process depends mainly on the degree to which commercial drug preparations meet current legal requirements and the syringes and preparation techniques used.