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Acer pseudoplatanus

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Nicholas M Dickinson – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • variability of metal resistance in Acer pseudoplatanus l sycamore callus tissue of different origins
    Environmental and Experimental Botany, 1996
    Co-Authors: Shaun A. Watmough, Nicholas M Dickinson

    Abstract:

    Abstract Twenty-eight callus culture cell lines established from shoot tip explants of mature Acer pseudoplatanus L. (sycamore) trees growing at seven metal-contaminated and three uncontaminated sites were screened for metal resistance. Patterns of Cu, Cd and Zn resistance were identified that were related to predicted toxicity of these metals in soils at the sites of origin, adjacent to metal-processing industries and mining spoils. Cell lines established from trees growing at primarily Pb- and Zn-contaminated sites with high soil pH (pH above 6.4) and limited metal bioavailability were no more resistant than those originating from uncontaminated sites. Patterns of metal removal from the media by callus only reflected resistance traits in the case of Ni-resistant cell lines from Zn-contaminated sites, in which callus contained between 30 and 100% less Ni. The results provide evidence that differences exist in patterns of metal resistance in trees according to previous exposure to specific metals. It remains to be understood why traits induced by acclimation are readily expressed in tissue culture and then remain stable in the absence of the toxic metal.

  • Induction of zinc and nickel resistance in Acer pseudoplatanus L. (sycamore) callus cell lines
    Environmental and Experimental Botany, 1995
    Co-Authors: Shaun A. Watmough, Christopher C. Gallivan, Nicholas M Dickinson

    Abstract:

    Abstract Changes in metal-resistance following pre-exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of Zn or Ni are reported in sycamore ( Acer pseudoplatanus L.) callus cell lines established from shoot explants of mature trees. A cell line derived from a site contaminated primarily by Cu, Cd and Zn possessed a higher resistance to Zn and Ni than did a cell line from an uncontaminated site. Repeated subculturing of both cell lines on 30 mg Zn l −1 and 5 mg Ni l −1 led to respective increases in Zn- and Ni-resistance. Resistance could be induced within an optimum range of media metal concentrations, and there was a clear limit to the level of metal-resistance achievable by induction. There was some evidence of co-resistance betweeen Zn and Ni; selection on 5 mg Ni l −1 did not increase Zn resistance of either cell line but repeated subculturing on 30 mg Zn l −1 considerably enhanced Ni resistance at critical test concentrations.

  • survival of Acer pseudoplatanus l sycamore seedlings on metalliferous soils
    New Phytologist, 1993
    Co-Authors: Andrew Turner, Nicholas M Dickinson

    Abstract:

    SUMMARY
    Seeds and seedlings of Acer pseudoplatanus L. (sycamore) were collected at sites contaminated by metals, originating either from mining spoil or from aerial deposition from metal processing industry, and at a number of relatively uncontaminated sites. Seedling growth was examined in relation to site of origin, both in nutrient solutions with elevated metal concentrations and in reciprocal transplant experiments in soils from the sites. Metal tolerance was not detected and there was no significant difference between plants from the different sites of origin. It was found, however, that roots could proliferate in uncontaminated zones of the soil and that, even in contaminated soils, most seedlings used in growth tests survived for at least three years despite impaired growth. Seedlings growing at the contaminated sites showed phytotoxic symptoms associated with high metal levels, but apparently healthy seedlings and saplings of different ages were also found. Some form of low level innate tolerance may be involved but it is suggested that phenotypic plasticity is more important than previously thought, potentially allowing survival until favourable conditions are encountered either temporally or spatially.

P Lado – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Effect of penconazole and flusilazol on the tonoplast of Acer pseudoplatanus cells
    Plant Science, 2003
    Co-Authors: Roberta Colombo, Raffaella Cerana, P Lado

    Abstract:

    Abstract Recent data showed that some triazole fungicides affect plasma membrane functionality in higher plants. In this paper, we studied the effect of two triazoles, penconazole and flusilazol, on the vacuolar membrane in Acer pseudoplatanus cultured cells. These substances from 0.1 mM concentration induced a reduction of the volume of the vacuoles in situ and from 0.05 mM concentration a lysis of the isolated vacuoles and an inhibition of two tonoplast enzyme activities, the nitrate-sensitive H + -ATPase and the K + -stimulated pyrophosphatase. These results indicate that penconazole and flusilazol can directly affect the vacuolar membrane, independently of their activity on biosynthetic metabolism.

  • enhanced k stimulated pyrophosphatase activity in nacl adapted cells of Acer pseudoplatanus
    Physiologia Plantarum, 1994
    Co-Authors: Luisa Zingarelli, Paola Anzani, P Lado

    Abstract:

    Cell suspension cultures of Acer pseudoplatanus L. (Bligny cell line) adapted to growth in the presence of NaCl, are a useful tool for investigating mechanisms for cellular salt tolerance. We compared the activities of vanadate-sensitive (plasma membrane) and nitrate-sensitive (tonoplast) ATPases, and tonoplast K + -stimulated PPase in microsomal fractions (8 000-108 000 g) from unadapted and NaCl-adapted (80 mM) cells of A. pseudoplatanus

  • Enhanced K^+-stimulated pyrophosphatase activity in NaCl-adapted cells of Acer pseudoplatanus
    Physiologia Plantarum, 1994
    Co-Authors: Luisa Zingarelli, Paola Anzani, P Lado

    Abstract:

    Cell suspension cultures of Acer pseudoplatanus L. (Bligny cell line) adapted to growth in the presence of NaCl, are a useful tool for investigating mechanisms for cellular salt tolerance. We compared the activities of vanadate-sensitive (plasma membrane) and nitrate-sensitive (tonoplast) ATPases, and tonoplast K + -stimulated PPase in microsomal fractions (8 000-108 000 g) from unadapted and NaCl-adapted (80 mM) cells of A. pseudoplatanus

Shaun A. Watmough – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • variability of metal resistance in Acer pseudoplatanus l sycamore callus tissue of different origins
    Environmental and Experimental Botany, 1996
    Co-Authors: Shaun A. Watmough, Nicholas M Dickinson

    Abstract:

    Abstract Twenty-eight callus culture cell lines established from shoot tip explants of mature Acer pseudoplatanus L. (sycamore) trees growing at seven metal-contaminated and three uncontaminated sites were screened for metal resistance. Patterns of Cu, Cd and Zn resistance were identified that were related to predicted toxicity of these metals in soils at the sites of origin, adjacent to metal-processing industries and mining spoils. Cell lines established from trees growing at primarily Pb- and Zn-contaminated sites with high soil pH (pH above 6.4) and limited metal bioavailability were no more resistant than those originating from uncontaminated sites. Patterns of metal removal from the media by callus only reflected resistance traits in the case of Ni-resistant cell lines from Zn-contaminated sites, in which callus contained between 30 and 100% less Ni. The results provide evidence that differences exist in patterns of metal resistance in trees according to previous exposure to specific metals. It remains to be understood why traits induced by acclimation are readily expressed in tissue culture and then remain stable in the absence of the toxic metal.

  • Induction of zinc and nickel resistance in Acer pseudoplatanus L. (sycamore) callus cell lines
    Environmental and Experimental Botany, 1995
    Co-Authors: Shaun A. Watmough, Christopher C. Gallivan, Nicholas M Dickinson

    Abstract:

    Abstract Changes in metal-resistance following pre-exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of Zn or Ni are reported in sycamore ( Acer pseudoplatanus L.) callus cell lines established from shoot explants of mature trees. A cell line derived from a site contaminated primarily by Cu, Cd and Zn possessed a higher resistance to Zn and Ni than did a cell line from an uncontaminated site. Repeated subculturing of both cell lines on 30 mg Zn l −1 and 5 mg Ni l −1 led to respective increases in Zn- and Ni-resistance. Resistance could be induced within an optimum range of media metal concentrations, and there was a clear limit to the level of metal-resistance achievable by induction. There was some evidence of co-resistance betweeen Zn and Ni; selection on 5 mg Ni l −1 did not increase Zn resistance of either cell line but repeated subculturing on 30 mg Zn l −1 considerably enhanced Ni resistance at critical test concentrations.