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Frank Thomas Lange – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • analysis and occurrence of seven artificial sweeteners in german waste water and surface water and in soil aquifer treatment sat
    Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 2009
    Co-Authors: Marco Scheurer, Heinzj Brauch, Frank Thomas Lange

    Abstract:

    A method for the simultaneous determination of seven commonly used artificial sweeteners in water is presented. The analytes were extracted by solid phase extraction using Bakerbond SDB 1 cartridges at pH 3 and analyzed by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in negative ionization mode. Ionization was enhanced by post-column addition of the alkaline modifier Tris(hydroxymethyl)amino methane. Except for aspartame and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone, recoveries were higher than 75% in potable water with comparable results for surface water. Matrix effects due to reduced extraction yields in undiluted waste water were negligible for aspartame and neotame but considerable for the other compounds. The widespread distribution of Acesulfame, saccharin, cyclamate, and sucralose in the aquatic environment could be proven. Concentrations in two influents of German sewage treatment plants (STPs) were up to 190 μg/L for cyclamate, about 40 μg/L for Acesulfame and saccharin, and less than 1 μg/L for sucralose. Removal in the STPs was limited for Acesulfame and sucralose and >94% for saccharin and cyclamate. The persistence of some artificial sweeteners during soil aquifer treatment was demonstrated and confirmed their environmental relevance. The use of sucralose and Acesulfame as tracers for anthropogenic contamination is conceivable. In German surface waters, Acesulfame was the predominant artificial sweetener with concentrations exceeding 2 μg/L. Other sweeteners were detected up to several hundred nanograms per liter in the order saccharin ≈ cyclamate > sucralose.

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  • Analysis and occurrence of seven artificial sweeteners in German waste water and surface water and in soil aquifer treatment (SAT)
    Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 2009
    Co-Authors: Marco Scheurer, Heinzj Brauch, Frank Thomas Lange

    Abstract:

    A method for the simultaneous determination of seven commonly used artificial sweeteners in water is presented. The analytes were extracted by solid phase extraction using Bakerbond SDB 1 cartridges at pH 3 and analyzed by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in negative ionization mode. Ionization was enhanced by post-column addition of the alkaline modifier Tris(hydroxymethyl)amino methane. Except for aspartame and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone, recoveries were higher than 75% in potable water with comparable results for surface water. Matrix effects due to reduced extraction yields in undiluted waste water were negligible for aspartame and neotame but considerable for the other compounds. The widespread distribution of Acesulfame, saccharin, cyclamate, and sucralose in the aquatic environment could be proven. Concentrations in two influents of German sewage treatment plants (STPs) were up to 190 μg/L for cyclamate, about 40 μg/L for Acesulfame and saccharin, and less than 1 μg/L for sucralose. Removal in the STPs was limited for Acesulfame and sucralose and >94% for saccharin and cyclamate. The persistence of some artificial sweeteners during soil aquifer treatment was demonstrated and confirmed their environmental relevance. The use of sucralose and Acesulfame as tracers for anthropogenic contamination is conceivable. In German surface waters, Acesulfame was the predominant artificial sweetener with concentrations exceeding 2 μg/L. Other sweeteners were detected up to several hundred nanograms per liter in the order saccharin ≈ cyclamate > sucralose. Figure Some artificial sweeteners are excreted unchanged and in particular Acesulfame is a perfect tracer for municipal waste water

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Marco Scheurer – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Transformation of the artificial sweetener Acesulfame by UV light
    Science of The Total Environment, 2014
    Co-Authors: Marco Scheurer, Heinz-jürgen Brauch, Beat Schmutz, Oliver Happel, Richard Wülser, Florian R. Storck

    Abstract:

    Abstract The transformation of the artificial sweetener Acesulfame by direct photolysis was investigated at various pH values, in different water types and at various concentration levels. Main photodegradation products of Acesulfame were elucidated and analyzed both in laboratory experiments and in a full-scale waterworks using UV treatment for disinfection purposes. The degradation of Acesulfame was found to be independent of the pH (range 5–11) and followed pseudo first order kinetics in a concentration range between 1 μg∙L − 1 and 10 mg∙L − 1 . Calculated rate constants were in the range between 5.4 · 10 − 3  s − 1 and 7.4 · 10 − 3  s − 1 . The main photodegradation products of Acesulfame were separated by ion exchange chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography and were identified as hydroxylated Acesulfame and iso-Acesulfame by high resolution mass spectrometry and fragmentation experiments. In the case of iso-Acesulfame an intramolecular rearrangement is assumed as the transformation product has a higher polarity and different product ions after MS fragmentation compared to Acesulfame. Minor transformation products were identified as amidosulfonic acid and sulfate by comparison with analytical standards. The transformation pathway was found to be transferable to drinking water production as the identified transformation products were also detected to a similar extent in fortified tap water. In a Swiss full-scale waterworks Acesulfame concentrations were reduced by approximately 30% and one of the main UV transformation products could be qualitatively detected.

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  • analysis and occurrence of seven artificial sweeteners in german waste water and surface water and in soil aquifer treatment sat
    Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 2009
    Co-Authors: Marco Scheurer, Heinzj Brauch, Frank Thomas Lange

    Abstract:

    A method for the simultaneous determination of seven commonly used artificial sweeteners in water is presented. The analytes were extracted by solid phase extraction using Bakerbond SDB 1 cartridges at pH 3 and analyzed by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in negative ionization mode. Ionization was enhanced by post-column addition of the alkaline modifier Tris(hydroxymethyl)amino methane. Except for aspartame and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone, recoveries were higher than 75% in potable water with comparable results for surface water. Matrix effects due to reduced extraction yields in undiluted waste water were negligible for aspartame and neotame but considerable for the other compounds. The widespread distribution of Acesulfame, saccharin, cyclamate, and sucralose in the aquatic environment could be proven. Concentrations in two influents of German sewage treatment plants (STPs) were up to 190 μg/L for cyclamate, about 40 μg/L for Acesulfame and saccharin, and less than 1 μg/L for sucralose. Removal in the STPs was limited for Acesulfame and sucralose and >94% for saccharin and cyclamate. The persistence of some artificial sweeteners during soil aquifer treatment was demonstrated and confirmed their environmental relevance. The use of sucralose and Acesulfame as tracers for anthropogenic contamination is conceivable. In German surface waters, Acesulfame was the predominant artificial sweetener with concentrations exceeding 2 μg/L. Other sweeteners were detected up to several hundred nanograms per liter in the order saccharin ≈ cyclamate > sucralose.

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  • Analysis and occurrence of seven artificial sweeteners in German waste water and surface water and in soil aquifer treatment (SAT)
    Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 2009
    Co-Authors: Marco Scheurer, Heinzj Brauch, Frank Thomas Lange

    Abstract:

    A method for the simultaneous determination of seven commonly used artificial sweeteners in water is presented. The analytes were extracted by solid phase extraction using Bakerbond SDB 1 cartridges at pH 3 and analyzed by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in negative ionization mode. Ionization was enhanced by post-column addition of the alkaline modifier Tris(hydroxymethyl)amino methane. Except for aspartame and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone, recoveries were higher than 75% in potable water with comparable results for surface water. Matrix effects due to reduced extraction yields in undiluted waste water were negligible for aspartame and neotame but considerable for the other compounds. The widespread distribution of Acesulfame, saccharin, cyclamate, and sucralose in the aquatic environment could be proven. Concentrations in two influents of German sewage treatment plants (STPs) were up to 190 μg/L for cyclamate, about 40 μg/L for Acesulfame and saccharin, and less than 1 μg/L for sucralose. Removal in the STPs was limited for Acesulfame and sucralose and >94% for saccharin and cyclamate. The persistence of some artificial sweeteners during soil aquifer treatment was demonstrated and confirmed their environmental relevance. The use of sucralose and Acesulfame as tracers for anthropogenic contamination is conceivable. In German surface waters, Acesulfame was the predominant artificial sweetener with concentrations exceeding 2 μg/L. Other sweeteners were detected up to several hundred nanograms per liter in the order saccharin ≈ cyclamate > sucralose. Figure Some artificial sweeteners are excreted unchanged and in particular Acesulfame is a perfect tracer for municipal waste water

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Heinzj Brauch – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • analysis and occurrence of seven artificial sweeteners in german waste water and surface water and in soil aquifer treatment sat
    Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 2009
    Co-Authors: Marco Scheurer, Heinzj Brauch, Frank Thomas Lange

    Abstract:

    A method for the simultaneous determination of seven commonly used artificial sweeteners in water is presented. The analytes were extracted by solid phase extraction using Bakerbond SDB 1 cartridges at pH 3 and analyzed by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in negative ionization mode. Ionization was enhanced by post-column addition of the alkaline modifier Tris(hydroxymethyl)amino methane. Except for aspartame and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone, recoveries were higher than 75% in potable water with comparable results for surface water. Matrix effects due to reduced extraction yields in undiluted waste water were negligible for aspartame and neotame but considerable for the other compounds. The widespread distribution of Acesulfame, saccharin, cyclamate, and sucralose in the aquatic environment could be proven. Concentrations in two influents of German sewage treatment plants (STPs) were up to 190 μg/L for cyclamate, about 40 μg/L for Acesulfame and saccharin, and less than 1 μg/L for sucralose. Removal in the STPs was limited for Acesulfame and sucralose and >94% for saccharin and cyclamate. The persistence of some artificial sweeteners during soil aquifer treatment was demonstrated and confirmed their environmental relevance. The use of sucralose and Acesulfame as tracers for anthropogenic contamination is conceivable. In German surface waters, Acesulfame was the predominant artificial sweetener with concentrations exceeding 2 μg/L. Other sweeteners were detected up to several hundred nanograms per liter in the order saccharin ≈ cyclamate > sucralose.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • Analysis and occurrence of seven artificial sweeteners in German waste water and surface water and in soil aquifer treatment (SAT)
    Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 2009
    Co-Authors: Marco Scheurer, Heinzj Brauch, Frank Thomas Lange

    Abstract:

    A method for the simultaneous determination of seven commonly used artificial sweeteners in water is presented. The analytes were extracted by solid phase extraction using Bakerbond SDB 1 cartridges at pH 3 and analyzed by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in negative ionization mode. Ionization was enhanced by post-column addition of the alkaline modifier Tris(hydroxymethyl)amino methane. Except for aspartame and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone, recoveries were higher than 75% in potable water with comparable results for surface water. Matrix effects due to reduced extraction yields in undiluted waste water were negligible for aspartame and neotame but considerable for the other compounds. The widespread distribution of Acesulfame, saccharin, cyclamate, and sucralose in the aquatic environment could be proven. Concentrations in two influents of German sewage treatment plants (STPs) were up to 190 μg/L for cyclamate, about 40 μg/L for Acesulfame and saccharin, and less than 1 μg/L for sucralose. Removal in the STPs was limited for Acesulfame and sucralose and >94% for saccharin and cyclamate. The persistence of some artificial sweeteners during soil aquifer treatment was demonstrated and confirmed their environmental relevance. The use of sucralose and Acesulfame as tracers for anthropogenic contamination is conceivable. In German surface waters, Acesulfame was the predominant artificial sweetener with concentrations exceeding 2 μg/L. Other sweeteners were detected up to several hundred nanograms per liter in the order saccharin ≈ cyclamate > sucralose. Figure Some artificial sweeteners are excreted unchanged and in particular Acesulfame is a perfect tracer for municipal waste water

    Free Register to Access Article