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Thomas M. Achenbach – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • AUT839151_Lay_Abstract – Supplemental material for International comparisons of autism spectrum disorder behaviors in preschoolers rated by parents and caregivers/teachers
    , 2019
    Co-Authors: Leslie A Rescorla, Masha Y. Ivanova, Courtney Given, Siobhan Glynn, Thomas M. Achenbach
    Abstract:

    Supplemental material, AUT839151_Lay_Abstract for International comparisons of autism spectrum disorder behaviors in preschoolers rated by parents and caregivers/teachers by Leslie A Rescorla, Courtney Given, Siobhan Glynn, Masha Y Ivanova and Thomas M Achenbach in Autism

  • The Encyclopedia of Clinical Psychology – Achenbach, Thomas M. (b. 1940)
    The Encyclopedia of Clinical Psychology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Thomas M. Achenbach
    Abstract:

    Thomas M. Achenbach (b. 1940) developed the Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA), which is used worldwide for ages 1½–90+ years and is available in 90 languages. Its use is reported in over 8,000 published studies from 80 societies. Achenbach earned his BA from Yale in 1962, was a German government fellow at Heidelberg University during the following year, obtained his PhD from the University of Minnesota in 1966, and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Yale Child Study Center. Beginning in 1967, Achenbach was a faculty member at Yale and then research psychologist at NIMH. Since 1980, he has been professor of psychiatry and psychology at the University of Vermont, where he is president of the nonprofit Research Center for Children, Youth, and Families. Achenbach‘s research has identified numerous syndromes and broader groupings of problems, for which he coined the terms “internalizing” and “externalizing.” He authored the first book for the discipline that he dubbed “developmental psychopathology.” Keywords: psychopathology; metadata; multi-informants; multiculturalism

  • Achenbach thomas m b 1940
    The Encyclopedia of Clinical Psychology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Thomas M. Achenbach
    Abstract:

    Thomas M. Achenbach (b. 1940) developed the Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA), which is used worldwide for ages 1½–90+ years and is available in 90 languages. Its use is reported in over 8,000 published studies from 80 societies. Achenbach earned his BA from Yale in 1962, was a German government fellow at Heidelberg University during the following year, obtained his PhD from the University of Minnesota in 1966, and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Yale Child Study Center. Beginning in 1967, Achenbach was a faculty member at Yale and then research psychologist at NIMH. Since 1980, he has been professor of psychiatry and psychology at the University of Vermont, where he is president of the nonprofit Research Center for Children, Youth, and Families. Achenbach‘s research has identified numerous syndromes and broader groupings of problems, for which he coined the terms “internalizing” and “externalizing.” He authored the first book for the discipline that he dubbed “developmental psychopathology.” Keywords: psychopathology; metadata; multi-informants; multiculturalism

Stefan Seelecke – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Masha Y. Ivanova – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • AUT839151_Lay_Abstract – Supplemental material for International comparisons of autism spectrum disorder behaviors in preschoolers rated by parents and caregivers/teachers
    , 2019
    Co-Authors: Leslie A Rescorla, Masha Y. Ivanova, Courtney Given, Siobhan Glynn, Thomas M. Achenbach
    Abstract:

    Supplemental material, AUT839151_Lay_Abstract for International comparisons of autism spectrum disorder behaviors in preschoolers rated by parents and caregivers/teachers by Leslie A Rescorla, Courtney Given, Siobhan Glynn, Masha Y Ivanova and Thomas M Achenbach in Autism

  • Consistency of Teacher-Reported Problems for Students in 21 Countries.
    School Psychology Review, 2007
    Co-Authors: Leslie Rescorla, Thomas M. Achenbach, Masha Y. Ivanova, Levent Dumenci, Fredrik Almqvist, Niels Bilenberg, Hector R. Bird, Sofia Ginzburg, Marie Bathiche, Anca Domuta
    Abstract:

    Abstract. This study compared teachers’ ratings of behavioral and emotional problems on the Teacher’s Report Form for general population samples in 21 countries (N = 30,957). Correlations between internal consistency coefficients in different countries averaged .90. Effects of country on scale scores ranged from 3% to 13%. Gender effects ranged from ********** In their classic article, Cronbach and Meehl (1955) stated that construct validity addresses the question, “What constructs account for variation in test performance?” Their first example for establishing construct validity involves investigating whether a test is “culture-free.” Thus, a crucial aspect of construct validation is determining if culture accounts for systematic variation in test performance. As described by Bracken and Barona (1991) and Geisinger (1994), many steps are needed to demonstrate what might be called the multicultural robustness of an instrument. First, translation of the instrument may be required, which in itself is a multistep process. Next, data must be collected using a large, representative sample. Among the features of the instrument that need to be systematically compared using data from different cultures are test-retest reliability, factor structure, internal consistency of scales, performance of individual items, mean scores, associations of scores with age and sex, and correlations with validating criteria. The present study investigated the internal consistency reliability, mean scale scores, age and gender patterns, and mean item scores of the Teacher’s Report Form (TRF; Achenbach & Rescorla, 2001) for 30,957 children in 21 different societies (19 countries, plus Hong Kong and the commonwealth of Puerto Rico, hereafter all called “countries”). First published by Achenbach and Edelbrock (1986) and revised by Achenbach and Rescorla (2001), the TRF has been translated into more than 20 languages. Although more than 200 published studies have reported TRF data from countries other than the United States, no studies to date have compared TRF scores from many countries in the same analyses. Findings from the present study are complemented by confirmatory factor analyses conducted by Ivanova et al. (2006) using the same data. Ivanova et al. (2006) reported good fit for the U.S.-derived factor model in the 20 other countries. The confirmatory factor analysis findings demonstrated that the constructs tapped by TRF syndromes are consistent across countries, which is an important component of multicultural robustness. Overview of the TRF Along with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) completed by parents and the Youth Self-Report (YSR), the TRF is a component of the Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA; Achenbach & Rescorla, 2001). The ASEBA uses a “bottom-up” approach, whereby syndromes of co-occurring problems are identified though exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. The scales for scoring the syndromes are then normed by age and gender using data from representative population-based samples. The 2001 edition of the TRF, designed for ages 6-18 (Achenbach & Rescorla, 2001), has 118 specific problem items, plus 2 open-ended problem items, all of which are rated as 0 = not true (as far as you know); 1 = somewhat or sometimes true; and 2 = very true or often true. …

  • Behavioral and Emotional Problems Reported by Parents of Children Ages 6 to 16 in 31 Societies
    Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 2007
    Co-Authors: Leslie Rescorla, Thomas M. Achenbach, Masha Y. Ivanova, Levent Dumenci, Fredrik Almqvist, Niels Bilenberg, Hector R. Bird, Wei Chen, Anca Dobrean, Manfred Döpfner
    Abstract:

    This study compared parents’ ratings of behavioral and emotional problems on the Child Behavior Checklist (Achenbach, 1991;Achenbach & Rescorla, 2001) for general population samples of children age…

Wesley Ballew – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Leslie Rescorla – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Consistency of Teacher-Reported Problems for Students in 21 Countries.
    School Psychology Review, 2007
    Co-Authors: Leslie Rescorla, Thomas M. Achenbach, Masha Y. Ivanova, Levent Dumenci, Fredrik Almqvist, Niels Bilenberg, Hector R. Bird, Sofia Ginzburg, Marie Bathiche, Anca Domuta
    Abstract:

    Abstract. This study compared teachers’ ratings of behavioral and emotional problems on the Teacher’s Report Form for general population samples in 21 countries (N = 30,957). Correlations between internal consistency coefficients in different countries averaged .90. Effects of country on scale scores ranged from 3% to 13%. Gender effects ranged from ********** In their classic article, Cronbach and Meehl (1955) stated that construct validity addresses the question, “What constructs account for variation in test performance?” Their first example for establishing construct validity involves investigating whether a test is “culture-free.” Thus, a crucial aspect of construct validation is determining if culture accounts for systematic variation in test performance. As described by Bracken and Barona (1991) and Geisinger (1994), many steps are needed to demonstrate what might be called the multicultural robustness of an instrument. First, translation of the instrument may be required, which in itself is a multistep process. Next, data must be collected using a large, representative sample. Among the features of the instrument that need to be systematically compared using data from different cultures are test-retest reliability, factor structure, internal consistency of scales, performance of individual items, mean scores, associations of scores with age and sex, and correlations with validating criteria. The present study investigated the internal consistency reliability, mean scale scores, age and gender patterns, and mean item scores of the Teacher’s Report Form (TRF; Achenbach & Rescorla, 2001) for 30,957 children in 21 different societies (19 countries, plus Hong Kong and the commonwealth of Puerto Rico, hereafter all called “countries”). First published by Achenbach and Edelbrock (1986) and revised by Achenbach and Rescorla (2001), the TRF has been translated into more than 20 languages. Although more than 200 published studies have reported TRF data from countries other than the United States, no studies to date have compared TRF scores from many countries in the same analyses. Findings from the present study are complemented by confirmatory factor analyses conducted by Ivanova et al. (2006) using the same data. Ivanova et al. (2006) reported good fit for the U.S.-derived factor model in the 20 other countries. The confirmatory factor analysis findings demonstrated that the constructs tapped by TRF syndromes are consistent across countries, which is an important component of multicultural robustness. Overview of the TRF Along with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) completed by parents and the Youth Self-Report (YSR), the TRF is a component of the Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA; Achenbach & Rescorla, 2001). The ASEBA uses a “bottom-up” approach, whereby syndromes of co-occurring problems are identified though exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. The scales for scoring the syndromes are then normed by age and gender using data from representative population-based samples. The 2001 edition of the TRF, designed for ages 6-18 (Achenbach & Rescorla, 2001), has 118 specific problem items, plus 2 open-ended problem items, all of which are rated as 0 = not true (as far as you know); 1 = somewhat or sometimes true; and 2 = very true or often true. …

  • Behavioral and Emotional Problems Reported by Parents of Children Ages 6 to 16 in 31 Societies
    Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 2007
    Co-Authors: Leslie Rescorla, Thomas M. Achenbach, Masha Y. Ivanova, Levent Dumenci, Fredrik Almqvist, Niels Bilenberg, Hector R. Bird, Wei Chen, Anca Dobrean, Manfred Döpfner
    Abstract:

    This study compared parents’ ratings of behavioral and emotional problems on the Child Behavior Checklist (Achenbach, 1991;Achenbach & Rescorla, 2001) for general population samples of children age…

  • The Generalizability of the Youth Self-Report Syndrome Structure in 23 Societies
    Journal of consulting and clinical psychology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Masha Y. Ivanova, Leslie Rescorla, Thomas M. Achenbach, Levent Dumenci, Fredrik Almqvist, Niels Bilenberg, Hector R. Bird, Anca Dobrean, Anders G. Broberg, Manfred Döpfner
    Abstract:

    As a basis for theories of psychopathology, clinical psychology and related disciplines need sound taxonomies that are generalizable across diverse populations. To test the generalizability of a statistically derived 8-syndrome taxonomic model for youth psychopathology, confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) were performed on the Youth Self-Report (T. M. Achenbach & L. A. Rescorla, 2001) completed by 30,243 youths 11-18 years old from 23 societies. The 8-syndrome taxonomic model met criteria for good fit to the data from each society. This was consistent with findings for the parent-completed Child Behavior Checklist (Achenbach & Rescorla, 2001) and the teacher-completed Teacher’s Report Form (Achenbach & Rescorla, 2001) from many societies. Separate CFAs by gender and age group supported the 8-syndrome model for boys and girls and for younger and older youths within individual societies. The findings provide initial support for the taxonomic generalizability of the 8-syndrome model across very diverse societies, both genders, and 2 age groups.