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Acid Component

The Experts below are selected from a list of 282 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

C.K.Y. Wong – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Effect of UV/ozone treatment on surface tension and adhesion in electronic packaging
    Components and Packaging Technologies, IEEE Transactions on, 2001
    Co-Authors: Shijian Luo, C.K.Y. Wong

    Abstract:

    Surface tension of material surfaces and interfaces is an important parameter that affects wetting and adhesion. Surface tension can be divided into three Components: Lifshitz-van der Waals Component, Acid Component, and base Component. In this study, the three-liquid-probe method was used to investigate the surface tension and its three Components of various surfaces of electronic packaging materials: benzocyclobutene (BCB) passivation, FR-4 board, polyimide board, and alumina board. When UV/ozone was employed to treat the surfaces, the surface tension increased, and the base Component increased the most. The change in surface tension due to UV/O3 treatment decayed with time after the treatment. The difference in surface tension between untreated and treated surface became smaller with the increase of time after UV/O3 treatment. Different substrates showed different rate of decay in surface tension change. Among the surfaces studied, BCB passivation showed the fastest decay after treatment, while alumina showed the slowest decay. The contact angles of several liquid underfill materials on BCB passivation and their surface tension before and after curing were also measured. It was found that the wetting was not the controlling factor in adhesion of the system investigated

  • Study on surface tension and adhesion in electronic packaging
    Electronic Components & Technology Conference, 2000. 2000 Proceedings. 50th, 2000
    Co-Authors: Shijian Luo, M. Vidal, C.K.Y. Wong

    Abstract:

    Different materials are used in electronic packaging, and thus there are many interfaces in an electronic package, and the adhesion at these interfaces is critical to the reliability of the assembly. Surface tension and its three Components (Lifshitz-van der Waals Component, Acid Component, and base Component) are important parameters that affect the adhesion. In order to improve the wetting and thus possibly adhesion of underfill material with substrate and passivation of flip-chip device, some techniques can be employed to modify the surfaces. It is necessary to understand the surface behavior before and after treatment, and its effect on adhesion. In this study, the three-liquid-probe method was used to investigate the surface tension and its three Components of various surfaces: benzocyclobutene (BCB) passivation, FR-4 board, polyimide board, and alumina board. The surface tension was changed with treatment by UV/ozone, which was indicated by the contact angle measurement. The base Component increased most after UV/O3 treatment. It was also shown that the change in contact angle decayed as time elapsed after treatment. Different substrates showed different decay rate. Among the surfaces studied, BCB passivation showed the fastest decay rate after treatment; while, alumina showed the slowest decay rate. The contact angles of several liquid underfill materials on BCB passivation and their surface tension before and after curing were also measured; the wetting was not the controlling factor in adhesion of the system investigated

  • Surface tension study of substrates in electronic packaging
    Advanced Packaging Materials: Processes, Properties andInterfaces, 2000. Proceedings. International Symposium on, 2000
    Co-Authors: Shijian Luo, M. Vidal, C.K.Y. Wong

    Abstract:

    There are many interfaces in electronic packaging, and the adhesion at those interfaces is critical to the reliability of the assembly. Surface tension of the surfaces and its three Components (Lifshitz-van der Waals Component, Acid Component, and base Component) are important parameters that affect the adhesion. In order to improve the wetting and thus possibly adhesion of underfill material with substrate and passivation of flip-chip device, some techniques can be employed to modify the surfaces. In this study, the three-liquid-probe method was used to study the surface tension and its three Components of various surfaces: benzocyclobutene (BCB) passivation, FR-4 board, polyimide board, and alumina board. The surface tension was changed with the treatment of UV/ozone, which was indicated by the contact angle measurement. The base Component increased most after UV/O3 treatment. It was also shown that the change in contact angle decayed as time elapsed after treatment. Different substrates showed different decay rate. Among the surfaces studied, BCB passivation showed the fastest decay rate after treatment; while, alumina showed the slowest decay rate

Shijian Luo – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Effect of UV/ozone treatment on surface tension and adhesion in electronic packaging
    Components and Packaging Technologies, IEEE Transactions on, 2001
    Co-Authors: Shijian Luo, C.K.Y. Wong

    Abstract:

    Surface tension of material surfaces and interfaces is an important parameter that affects wetting and adhesion. Surface tension can be divided into three Components: Lifshitz-van der Waals Component, Acid Component, and base Component. In this study, the three-liquid-probe method was used to investigate the surface tension and its three Components of various surfaces of electronic packaging materials: benzocyclobutene (BCB) passivation, FR-4 board, polyimide board, and alumina board. When UV/ozone was employed to treat the surfaces, the surface tension increased, and the base Component increased the most. The change in surface tension due to UV/O3 treatment decayed with time after the treatment. The difference in surface tension between untreated and treated surface became smaller with the increase of time after UV/O3 treatment. Different substrates showed different rate of decay in surface tension change. Among the surfaces studied, BCB passivation showed the fastest decay after treatment, while alumina showed the slowest decay. The contact angles of several liquid underfill materials on BCB passivation and their surface tension before and after curing were also measured. It was found that the wetting was not the controlling factor in adhesion of the system investigated

  • Study on surface tension and adhesion in electronic packaging
    Electronic Components & Technology Conference, 2000. 2000 Proceedings. 50th, 2000
    Co-Authors: Shijian Luo, M. Vidal, C.K.Y. Wong

    Abstract:

    Different materials are used in electronic packaging, and thus there are many interfaces in an electronic package, and the adhesion at these interfaces is critical to the reliability of the assembly. Surface tension and its three Components (Lifshitz-van der Waals Component, Acid Component, and base Component) are important parameters that affect the adhesion. In order to improve the wetting and thus possibly adhesion of underfill material with substrate and passivation of flip-chip device, some techniques can be employed to modify the surfaces. It is necessary to understand the surface behavior before and after treatment, and its effect on adhesion. In this study, the three-liquid-probe method was used to investigate the surface tension and its three Components of various surfaces: benzocyclobutene (BCB) passivation, FR-4 board, polyimide board, and alumina board. The surface tension was changed with treatment by UV/ozone, which was indicated by the contact angle measurement. The base Component increased most after UV/O3 treatment. It was also shown that the change in contact angle decayed as time elapsed after treatment. Different substrates showed different decay rate. Among the surfaces studied, BCB passivation showed the fastest decay rate after treatment; while, alumina showed the slowest decay rate. The contact angles of several liquid underfill materials on BCB passivation and their surface tension before and after curing were also measured; the wetting was not the controlling factor in adhesion of the system investigated

  • Surface tension study of substrates in electronic packaging
    Advanced Packaging Materials: Processes, Properties andInterfaces, 2000. Proceedings. International Symposium on, 2000
    Co-Authors: Shijian Luo, M. Vidal, C.K.Y. Wong

    Abstract:

    There are many interfaces in electronic packaging, and the adhesion at those interfaces is critical to the reliability of the assembly. Surface tension of the surfaces and its three Components (Lifshitz-van der Waals Component, Acid Component, and base Component) are important parameters that affect the adhesion. In order to improve the wetting and thus possibly adhesion of underfill material with substrate and passivation of flip-chip device, some techniques can be employed to modify the surfaces. In this study, the three-liquid-probe method was used to study the surface tension and its three Components of various surfaces: benzocyclobutene (BCB) passivation, FR-4 board, polyimide board, and alumina board. The surface tension was changed with the treatment of UV/ozone, which was indicated by the contact angle measurement. The base Component increased most after UV/O3 treatment. It was also shown that the change in contact angle decayed as time elapsed after treatment. Different substrates showed different decay rate. Among the surfaces studied, BCB passivation showed the fastest decay rate after treatment; while, alumina showed the slowest decay rate

Jan Tack – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • review article the role of bile and pepsin in the pathophysiology and treatment of gastro oesophageal reflux disease
    Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 2006
    Co-Authors: Jan Tack

    Abstract:

    Summary

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is a multifaceted and multifactorial disorder which results from the reflux of gastric contents into the oesophagus. Animal studies suggest that synergism between Acid and pepsin and conjugated bile Acids have the greatest damaging potential for oesophageal mucosa, although unconjugated bile Acids may be caustic at more neutral pH.

    Human studies are compatible with a synergistic action between Acid and duodenogastric reflux in inducing lesions. During prolonged monitoring studies, typical gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms are more related to Acid reflux events than to non-Acid reflux events.

    However, symptoms that persist during Acid suppressive therapy are often related to non-Acid reflux events. The therapeutic options for the non-Acid Component of the refluxate, including Acid suppression, prokinetics, baclofen, surgery and mucosal protective agents like alginates, are discussed.

  • review article role of pepsin and bile in gastro oesophageal reflux disease
    Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 2005
    Co-Authors: Jan Tack

    Abstract:

    Summary

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is defined as the presence of symptoms or lesions that can be attributed to the reflux of gastric contents into the oesophagus. Aspiration and prolonged monitoring studies in humans have shown that reflux of gastric contents is comprised of both Acid and non-Acid Components, in healthy as well as diseased people. Methods to monitor the non-Acid Component of the refluxate are described in detail. Experimental models suggest that synergism between Acid and pepsin and conjugated bile Acids have the greatest damaging potential for oesophageal mucosa, although unconjugated bile Acids may be caustic at a more neutral pH. Human studies are compatible with a synergistic action between Acid and duodenogastric reflux in inducing lesions. During prolonged monitoring studies, typical gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptoms are more related to Acid reflux events than to non-Acid reflux events. However, symptoms that persist during Acid-suppressive therapy are often related to non-Acid reflux events. The therapeutic options for the non-Acid Component of the refluxate, including Acid suppression, prokinetics, baclofen and surgery, are discussed.