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Acidified Milk

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Richard Ipsen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Tsutomu Kobayashi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Milena Corredig – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Nanoemulsions and Acidified Milk gels as a strategy for improving stability and antioxidant activity of yarrow phenolic compounds after gastrointestinal digestion.
    Food research international (Ottawa Ont.), 2019
    Co-Authors: Marisol Villalva, Milena Corredig, Laura Jaime, Elena Arranz, Zhengtao Zhao, Guillermo Reglero, Susana Santoyo
    Abstract:

    Abstract The aim of this study was to improve the stability and antioxidant activity of yarrow phenolic compounds upon an in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion. Therefore, two types of caseins-based delivery systems, sodium caseinate stabilized nanoemulsions (NEs) and glucono deltdelta-lactone Acidified Milk gels (MGs), were formulated containing an ultrasound-assisted yarrow extract (YE) at two concentrations (1 and 2.5 mg/mL). Formulations with 1 mg/mL of YE were chosen based on their higher encapsulation efficiency to perform the in vitro digestion experiments. After digestion, YE-loaded NEs only partially protected phenolic compounds from degradation; meanwhile the phenolic composition of YE including in MGs after digestion was quite similar to undigested YE. Moreover, the antioxidant activity of MGs after digestion was higher than NEs digested samples, which confirms the higher protection of YE phenolic compound by the Milk gels systems. This research demonstrated the potential use of Acidified MGs as carriers to improve the stability and antioxidant activity of yarrow phenolic compounds. Therefore, these matrices could be employed to develop new dairy products enriched with phenolic compounds.

  • the stabilizing behaviour of soybean soluble polysaccharide and pectin in Acidified Milk beverages
    International Dairy Journal, 2006
    Co-Authors: Akihiro Nakamura, Ryuji Yoshida, Hirokazu Maeda, Milena Corredig
    Abstract:

    The mechanisms of stabilization of soybean soluble polysaccharide (SSPS) and high methoxyl pectin (HMP) in Acidified Milk drinks were studied focusing on the differences in behaviour between the two polysaccharides. The changes in casein micelles size during acidification with glucono-δ-lactone or by direct acidification were measured using light scattering. When HMP was added to skim Milk before acidification, pectin adsorbed on the surface of the casein micelles via electrostatic interactions and prevented casein aggregation. Results suggested that adsorption of pectin occurred from the beginning of acidification and somewhat affected the rearrangement of casein micelles in the pH range between 5.8 and 5.0. On the other hand, SSPS, at concentrations up to 2% (w/w), did not interact with caseins at pH >4.6. At pH <4.2 SSPS showed better stabilizing properties than HMP. In addition, between pH 4.2 and 3.2, SSPS-stabilized acid dispersions were not affected by pH, while dispersions homogenized with pectin showed a size distribution that depended on pH. The differences in structure between SSPS and HMP account for the unique functionalities of the two polysaccharides in acid Milk systems.

  • Pasteurization affects aggregation of Acidified Milk dispersions and pectin
    , 2006
    Co-Authors: Brian W. Barnes, Milena Corredig, Louise Wicker
    Abstract:

    Commercial pectins were added at stabilizing levels to Acidified Milk dispersions and the effect of pectin type and pasteurization on the pectinprotein interaction was evaluated by gel permpermeationochromatography with in-line multi-angle light scattering, refractive index, and UV detectors. Commercial pectins had no apparent effect on the differences in molecular weight distributions of the soluble material in the dispersions. The weight average molemolecular weight (M w ) of individual pectins were 1.2 to over 4 million and were polydisperse with M w /M n ratios greater than 1.0. The M w of soluble components in the mixed dispersions were 2-8 times higher than pectin alone and had greater polydispersity. Pasteurization had a greater effect on molecular weight distributions and polydispersity than pectin type. A second, high molecular weight aggregate was observed in all pasteurized samples. This aggregate was 10 times larger after pasteurization compared to non-pasteurized samples.

X G Cui – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • aerosolized surfactant and dextran for experimental acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by Acidified Milk in rats
    Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, 2003
    Co-Authors: X G Cui, Katsumi Tashiro, H Matsumoto, Y Tsubokawa, Tsutomu Kobayashi
    Abstract:

    Background:  Inhibition of pulmonary surfactant by plasma-derived proteins is an important pathogenetic factor of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Inhalation of aerosolized surfactant may be suitable for early treatment of ARDS. However, requirement of a high dose is a drawback. Because dextran reverses surfactant inhibition, we examined whether dextran improves the therapeutic effects of aerosolized surfactant in rats with experimental ARDS. Methods:  Acidified Milk (pH 1.8, 1.5 ml kg−1) was injected into the trachea of the rats ventilated with pure oxygen using 2.45 kPa peak inspiratory pressure and 0.74 kPa positive end-expiratory pressure. When PaO2 decreased to <13 kPa, the rats were assigned to four groups: control group (n = 8), receiving no material; D-only group (n = 6), receiving aerosolized dextran for 45 min; S-only group (n = 8), receiving aerosolized modified natural surfactant (MNS) for 30 min; and S-plus-D group (n = 9), receiving aerosolized MNS for 30 min followed by aerosolized dextran for 15 min. Results:  In the control group and D-only groups, the mean PaO2 remained at 38 kPa for 180 min (P < 0.01 vs. S-only group). Conclusion:  Inhalation of aerosolized dextran potentiates the effects of aerosolized surfactant by prolonging the therapeutic response.

  • Aerosolized surfactant and dextran for experimental acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by Acidified Milk in rats.
    Acta anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, 2003
    Co-Authors: X G Cui, Katsumi Tashiro, H Matsumoto, Y Tsubokawa, Tsutomu Kobayashi
    Abstract:

    Background:  Inhibition of pulmonary surfactant by plasma-derived proteins is an important pathogenetic factor of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Inhalation of aerosolized surfactant may be suitable for early treatment of ARDS. However, requirement of a high dose is a drawback. Because dextran reverses surfactant inhibition, we examined whether dextran improves the therapeutic effects of aerosolized surfactant in rats with experimental ARDS. Methods:  Acidified Milk (pH 1.8, 1.5 ml kg−1) was injected into the trachea of the rats ventilated with pure oxygen using 2.45 kPa peak inspiratory pressure and 0.74 kPa positive end-expiratory pressure. When PaO2 decreased to

Hongbin Zhang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Influence of the degree of esterification of soluble soybean polysaccharide on the stability of Acidified Milk drinks
    Food Hydrocolloids, 2020
    Co-Authors: Zhixiang Cai, Yue Wei, Yalong Guo, Hongbin Zhang
    Abstract:

    Abstract Soluble soybean polysaccharide (SSPS), an anionic polysaccharide extracted from the by-product of soybean protprotein, has been widely used as a stabilizer for the stabilization of casein dispersions. The methyl esterified carboxylic group of galacturonic acid (GalA) in SSPS has a vital influence on its physicochemical and functional properties. In particular, the degree of esterification (DE) of SSPS plays an important role in the stability of Acidified Milk drinks (AMDs). Thus, in this work, the DE of SSPS was determined by 1H NMR specspectroscopy and titration method. The influence of DE of SSPS on the stability of AMDs was comprehensively investigated and evaluated by using LUMiSizer. It was found that the SSPS with a low DE showed better stabilization in AMDs compared to SSPS with a high DE. Zeta potential measurements can aid in elucidating the mechanisms responsible for the improved stability of AMDs, which showed that the decrease in DE resulted in the more negative zeta potential of SPSS coated casein particles. These results demonstrated that SSPS with a low DE has a high ability to stabilize AMDs, mostly due to the large electrostatic repulsive force of SSPS and the steric repulsive force of adsorption layer that is formed on the surface of casein particles.

  • Impact of distribution of carboxymethyl substituents in the stabilizer of carboxymethyl cellulose on the stability of Acidified Milk drinks
    Food Hydrocolloids, 2018
    Co-Authors: Zhixiang Cai, Hongbin Zhang
    Abstract:

    Abstract The influences of molecular parameters such as molecular weight ( M w ), the degree of substitution (DS) and especially the distribution of carboxymethyl substituents within the anhydroglucose unit (AGU) of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) on the rheological properties of CMC solutions and the stability of Acidified Milk drinks (AMDs) induced by this cellulose ether have been comprehensively investigated and evaluated by LUMi-Sizer. The DS and the distribution of carboxymethyl substituents are characterized by means of 1 H NMR spectroscopy using a set of acid-hydrolyzing CMC samples. A new CMC molecular parameter of R i indicating the individual degree of substitution at the position of either C-2 ( R 2 ) or C-6 ( R 6 ) in AGU is proposed to evaluate the influence of distribution of carboxymethyl substituents on the stability of the Milk drinks. It is found that the distribution of carboxymethyl substituents also plays a key role in the stability of AMDs. The stability of the drinks increases not only with increasing the M w and DS but also with decreasing the R 2 or increasing the R 6 of CMC. This fact is explained on the basis of CMC with a higher individual DS at C-2 position resulting in higher electronegativity, thus increasing the electrostatic repulsion between CMC-adsorbed casein particles in the colloidal system, thereby contributing to a better stability to AMDs. These findings provide an insight into fabricating better stability of AMDs induced by CMC.

  • Influence of homogenisation and the degradation of stabilizer on the stability of Acidified Milk drinks stabilized by carboxymethylcellulose
    LWT – Food Science and Technology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Hongbin Zhang
    Abstract:

    Abstract The present work deals with the influences of both homogenisation and the degradation of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) on the stability of two kinds of Acidified Milk drinks (AMDs), directly Acidified Milk drinks and yoghurt drinks. The effect of homogenisation pressure for direct acidification process was investigated and evaluated. The experimental results showed that homogenisation was required to achieve a significantly small particle size (0.7 μm in the present work) and to prevent sedimentation and serum separation. However, homogenisation at too high pressures was not beneficial for the stability of the colloidal systems. The occurrence of degradation of CMC during homogenisation weakened the stabilisation effect of CMC. A qualified homogenisation pressure of 20 MPa should be chosen to achieve a good stability when a usually practical pressure range of 0–30 MPa was applied. In addition, the stability of directly Acidified Milk and yoghurt drinks prepared under the same homogenisation pressure was also investigated. While their stability increased with increasing CMC concentration, the degradation of CMC at low pH during storage gave rise to instability of the final products.