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Aconitum Napellus

The Experts below are selected from a list of 312 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Anne-laure Jacquemart – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Male flowers of Aconitum compensate for toxic pollen with increased floral signals and rewards for pollinators
    Scientific Reports, 2019
    Co-Authors: Anne-laure Jacquemart, Christel Buyens, Marie-france Herent, Joëlle Quetin-leclercq, Georges Lognay, Thierry Hance, Muriel Quinet

    Abstract:

    Many plants require animal pollinators for successful reproduction; these plants provide pollinator resources in pollen and nectar (rewards) and attract pollinators by specific cues (signals). In a seeming contradiction, some plants produce toxins such as alkaloids in their pollen and nectar, protecting their resources from ineffective pollinators. We investigated signals and rewards in the toxic, protandrous bee-pollinated plant Aconitum Napellus, hypothesizing that male-phase flower reproductive success is pollinator-limited, which should favour higher levels of signals (odours) and rewards (nectar and pollen) compared with female-phase flowers. Furthermore, we expected insect visitors to forage only for nectar, due to the toxicity of pollen. We demonstrated that male-phase flowers emitted more volatile molecules and produced higher volumes of nectar than female-phase flowers. Alkaloids in pollen functioned as chemical defences, and were more diverse and more concentrated compared to the alkaloids in nectar. Visitors actively collected little pollen for larval food but consumed more of the less-toxic nectar. Toxic pollen remaining on the bee bodies promoted pollen transfer efficiency, facilitating pollination.

  • Nectar robbing improves male reproductive success of the endangered Aconitum Napellus ssp. lusitanicum
    Evolutionary Ecology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Carolin Mayer, Charles Dehon, Anne-laure Gauthier, Olivier Naveau, Cyrielle Rigo, Anne-laure Jacquemart

    Abstract:

    Nectar robbery is usually thought to impact negatively on the reproductive success of plants, but also neutral or even positive effects have been reported. Very few studies have investigated the effects of nectar robbing on the behaviour of legitimate pollinators so far. Such behavioural changes may lead to the reduction of geitonogamy or to increased pollen movement. We simulated nectar robbing in experimental sites as well as in natural populations of Aconitum Napellus ssp. lusitanicum , a rare plant pollinated by long-tongued bumblebees. In an experimental setup, we removed the nectaries of 40 % of the flowers, which is similar to rates of robbing observed in wild populations. Patches of plants with experimentally robbed flowers were compared with control patches containing plants with untreated flowers. We observed pollinator behaviour, mimicked male reproductive success (pollen dispersal) using fluorescent dye, and measured female reproductive success (seed set). The main legitimate visitors were bumblebees while honeybees were often observed robbing nectar. They did so by “base working”, i.e. sliding between tepals. Bumblebees tended to visit fewer flowers per plant and spent less time per single flower when these had been experimentally robbed. This change in behaviour consequently increased the proportion of flowers visited by bumblebees in patches with robbed flowers. Fluorescent dye mimicking pollen flow was dispersed larger distances after pollinators had visited patches with robbed flowers compared to control patches. Average seed set per plant was not affected by nectar robbing. Our results demonstrated that A. Napellus does not suffer from nectar robbery but may rather benefit via improved pollen dispersal and thus, male reproductive success. Knowledge on such combined effects of behavioural changes of pollinators due to nectar robbery is important to understand the evolutionary significance of exploiters of such mutualistic relationships between plants and their pollinators.

  • nectar robbing improves male reproductive success of the endangered Aconitum Napellus ssp lusitanicum
    Evolutionary Ecology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Carolin Mayer, Charles Dehon, Anne-laure Gauthier, Olivier Naveau, Cyrielle Rigo, Anne-laure Jacquemart

    Abstract:

    Nectar robbery is usually thought to impact negatively on the reproductive success of plants, but also neutral or even positive effects have been reported. Very few studies have investigated the effects of nectar robbing on the behaviour of legitimate pollinators so far. Such behavioural changes may lead to the reduction of geitonogamy or to increased pollen movement. We simulated nectar robbing in experimental sites as well as in natural populations of Aconitum Napellus ssp. lusitanicum, a rare plant pollinated by long-tongued bumblebees. In an experimental setup, we removed the nectaries of 40 % of the flowers, which is similar to rates of robbing observed in wild populations. Patches of plants with experimentally robbed flowers were compared with control patches containing plants with untreated flowers. We observed pollinator behaviour, mimicked male reproductive success (pollen dispersal) using fluorescent dye, and measured female reproductive success (seed set). The main legitimate visitors were bumblebees while honeybees were often observed robbing nectar. They did so by “base working”, i.e. sliding between tepals. Bumblebees tended to visit fewer flowers per plant and spent less time per single flower when these had been experimentally robbed. This change in behaviour consequently increased the proportion of flowers visited by bumblebees in patches with robbed flowers. Fluorescent dye mimicking pollen flow was dispersed larger distances after pollinators had visited patches with robbed flowers compared to control patches. Average seed set per plant was not affected by nectar robbing. Our results demonstrated that A. Napellus does not suffer from nectar robbery but may rather benefit via improved pollen dispersal and thus, male reproductive success. Knowledge on such combined effects of behavioural changes of pollinators due to nectar robbery is important to understand the evolutionary significance of exploiters of such mutualistic relationships between plants and their pollinators. © 2014 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.

Carolin Mayer – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Nectar robbing improves male reproductive success of the endangered Aconitum Napellus ssp. lusitanicum
    Evolutionary Ecology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Carolin Mayer, Charles Dehon, Anne-laure Gauthier, Olivier Naveau, Cyrielle Rigo, Anne-laure Jacquemart

    Abstract:

    Nectar robbery is usually thought to impact negatively on the reproductive success of plants, but also neutral or even positive effects have been reported. Very few studies have investigated the effects of nectar robbing on the behaviour of legitimate pollinators so far. Such behavioural changes may lead to the reduction of geitonogamy or to increased pollen movement. We simulated nectar robbing in experimental sites as well as in natural populations of Aconitum Napellus ssp. lusitanicum , a rare plant pollinated by long-tongued bumblebees. In an experimental setup, we removed the nectaries of 40 % of the flowers, which is similar to rates of robbing observed in wild populations. Patches of plants with experimentally robbed flowers were compared with control patches containing plants with untreated flowers. We observed pollinator behaviour, mimicked male reproductive success (pollen dispersal) using fluorescent dye, and measured female reproductive success (seed set). The main legitimate visitors were bumblebees while honeybees were often observed robbing nectar. They did so by “base working”, i.e. sliding between tepals. Bumblebees tended to visit fewer flowers per plant and spent less time per single flower when these had been experimentally robbed. This change in behaviour consequently increased the proportion of flowers visited by bumblebees in patches with robbed flowers. Fluorescent dye mimicking pollen flow was dispersed larger distances after pollinators had visited patches with robbed flowers compared to control patches. Average seed set per plant was not affected by nectar robbing. Our results demonstrated that A. Napellus does not suffer from nectar robbery but may rather benefit via improved pollen dispersal and thus, male reproductive success. Knowledge on such combined effects of behavioural changes of pollinators due to nectar robbery is important to understand the evolutionary significance of exploiters of such mutualistic relationships between plants and their pollinators.

  • nectar robbing improves male reproductive success of the endangered Aconitum Napellus ssp lusitanicum
    Evolutionary Ecology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Carolin Mayer, Charles Dehon, Anne-laure Gauthier, Olivier Naveau, Cyrielle Rigo, Anne-laure Jacquemart

    Abstract:

    Nectar robbery is usually thought to impact negatively on the reproductive success of plants, but also neutral or even positive effects have been reported. Very few studies have investigated the effects of nectar robbing on the behaviour of legitimate pollinators so far. Such behavioural changes may lead to the reduction of geitonogamy or to increased pollen movement. We simulated nectar robbing in experimental sites as well as in natural populations of Aconitum Napellus ssp. lusitanicum, a rare plant pollinated by long-tongued bumblebees. In an experimental setup, we removed the nectaries of 40 % of the flowers, which is similar to rates of robbing observed in wild populations. Patches of plants with experimentally robbed flowers were compared with control patches containing plants with untreated flowers. We observed pollinator behaviour, mimicked male reproductive success (pollen dispersal) using fluorescent dye, and measured female reproductive success (seed set). The main legitimate visitors were bumblebees while honeybees were often observed robbing nectar. They did so by “base working”, i.e. sliding between tepals. Bumblebees tended to visit fewer flowers per plant and spent less time per single flower when these had been experimentally robbed. This change in behaviour consequently increased the proportion of flowers visited by bumblebees in patches with robbed flowers. Fluorescent dye mimicking pollen flow was dispersed larger distances after pollinators had visited patches with robbed flowers compared to control patches. Average seed set per plant was not affected by nectar robbing. Our results demonstrated that A. Napellus does not suffer from nectar robbery but may rather benefit via improved pollen dispersal and thus, male reproductive success. Knowledge on such combined effects of behavioural changes of pollinators due to nectar robbery is important to understand the evolutionary significance of exploiters of such mutualistic relationships between plants and their pollinators. © 2014 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.

Anne-laure Gauthier – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Nectar robbing improves male reproductive success of the endangered Aconitum Napellus ssp. lusitanicum
    Evolutionary Ecology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Carolin Mayer, Charles Dehon, Anne-laure Gauthier, Olivier Naveau, Cyrielle Rigo, Anne-laure Jacquemart

    Abstract:

    Nectar robbery is usually thought to impact negatively on the reproductive success of plants, but also neutral or even positive effects have been reported. Very few studies have investigated the effects of nectar robbing on the behaviour of legitimate pollinators so far. Such behavioural changes may lead to the reduction of geitonogamy or to increased pollen movement. We simulated nectar robbing in experimental sites as well as in natural populations of Aconitum Napellus ssp. lusitanicum , a rare plant pollinated by long-tongued bumblebees. In an experimental setup, we removed the nectaries of 40 % of the flowers, which is similar to rates of robbing observed in wild populations. Patches of plants with experimentally robbed flowers were compared with control patches containing plants with untreated flowers. We observed pollinator behaviour, mimicked male reproductive success (pollen dispersal) using fluorescent dye, and measured female reproductive success (seed set). The main legitimate visitors were bumblebees while honeybees were often observed robbing nectar. They did so by “base working”, i.e. sliding between tepals. Bumblebees tended to visit fewer flowers per plant and spent less time per single flower when these had been experimentally robbed. This change in behaviour consequently increased the proportion of flowers visited by bumblebees in patches with robbed flowers. Fluorescent dye mimicking pollen flow was dispersed larger distances after pollinators had visited patches with robbed flowers compared to control patches. Average seed set per plant was not affected by nectar robbing. Our results demonstrated that A. Napellus does not suffer from nectar robbery but may rather benefit via improved pollen dispersal and thus, male reproductive success. Knowledge on such combined effects of behavioural changes of pollinators due to nectar robbery is important to understand the evolutionary significance of exploiters of such mutualistic relationships between plants and their pollinators.

  • nectar robbing improves male reproductive success of the endangered Aconitum Napellus ssp lusitanicum
    Evolutionary Ecology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Carolin Mayer, Charles Dehon, Anne-laure Gauthier, Olivier Naveau, Cyrielle Rigo, Anne-laure Jacquemart

    Abstract:

    Nectar robbery is usually thought to impact negatively on the reproductive success of plants, but also neutral or even positive effects have been reported. Very few studies have investigated the effects of nectar robbing on the behaviour of legitimate pollinators so far. Such behavioural changes may lead to the reduction of geitonogamy or to increased pollen movement. We simulated nectar robbing in experimental sites as well as in natural populations of Aconitum Napellus ssp. lusitanicum, a rare plant pollinated by long-tongued bumblebees. In an experimental setup, we removed the nectaries of 40 % of the flowers, which is similar to rates of robbing observed in wild populations. Patches of plants with experimentally robbed flowers were compared with control patches containing plants with untreated flowers. We observed pollinator behaviour, mimicked male reproductive success (pollen dispersal) using fluorescent dye, and measured female reproductive success (seed set). The main legitimate visitors were bumblebees while honeybees were often observed robbing nectar. They did so by “base working”, i.e. sliding between tepals. Bumblebees tended to visit fewer flowers per plant and spent less time per single flower when these had been experimentally robbed. This change in behaviour consequently increased the proportion of flowers visited by bumblebees in patches with robbed flowers. Fluorescent dye mimicking pollen flow was dispersed larger distances after pollinators had visited patches with robbed flowers compared to control patches. Average seed set per plant was not affected by nectar robbing. Our results demonstrated that A. Napellus does not suffer from nectar robbery but may rather benefit via improved pollen dispersal and thus, male reproductive success. Knowledge on such combined effects of behavioural changes of pollinators due to nectar robbery is important to understand the evolutionary significance of exploiters of such mutualistic relationships between plants and their pollinators. © 2014 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.