Acoustic Analysis - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Acoustic Analysis

The Experts below are selected from a list of 138897 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Acoustic Analysis – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Kanako Nemoto – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Large-Scale Structural-Acoustic Analysis by the Sub-Space Superposition Synthesis Method
    JSME International Journal Series C, 1999
    Co-Authors: Koki Shiohata, Kanako Nemoto
    Abstract:

    A large-scale structural-Acoustic Analysis using sub-space superposition, in which a cavity is divided into several Acoustic fields has been developed.This system uses a transfer-function mehtod to solve the Acoustics efficiently.By solving simultaneous equations using the Gaussian-elimination method for each pair of neighboring Acoustic sub-fields in sequence, calculation time and memory requirements are reduced.Calculation accuracy is the same as when calculating the entire Acoustic field without dividing it.We created a closed Acoustic model (a cavity model) and used it to numerically simulate Acoustics.The simulation results show that the developed large-scale structural-Acoustic Analysis effectively reduces calculation resources.

  • A Method for Large-Scale Structural-Acoustic Analysis
    Volume 1C: 16th Biennial Conference on Mechanical Vibration and Noise, 1997
    Co-Authors: Koki Shiohata, Kanako Nemoto, T. Iwatsubo
    Abstract:

    Abstract This paper presents a method for large-scale structural-Acoustic Analysis in which a cavity is divided into several Acoustic fields, and a transfer-function method is used to solve the Acoustics efficiently. By solving simultaneous equations using the Gaussian elimination method sequentially for each pair of neighboring Acoustic sub-fields, the calculation time and memory requirements are reduced. Calculation accuracy is the same as when calculating the entire Acoustic field without first dividing it. We created two kinds of closed Acoustic models (cavity models) and carried out numerical simulations. The results showed that the proposed method is effective for large-scale structural-Acoustic Analysis.

Koki Shiohata – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Large-Scale Structural-Acoustic Analysis by the Sub-Space Superposition Synthesis Method
    JSME International Journal Series C, 1999
    Co-Authors: Koki Shiohata, Kanako Nemoto
    Abstract:

    A large-scale structural-Acoustic Analysis using sub-space superposition, in which a cavity is divided into several Acoustic fields has been developed.This system uses a transfer-function mehtod to solve the Acoustics efficiently.By solving simultaneous equations using the Gaussian-elimination method for each pair of neighboring Acoustic sub-fields in sequence, calculation time and memory requirements are reduced.Calculation accuracy is the same as when calculating the entire Acoustic field without dividing it.We created a closed Acoustic model (a cavity model) and used it to numerically simulate Acoustics.The simulation results show that the developed large-scale structural-Acoustic Analysis effectively reduces calculation resources.

  • A Method for Large-Scale Structural-Acoustic Analysis
    Volume 1C: 16th Biennial Conference on Mechanical Vibration and Noise, 1997
    Co-Authors: Koki Shiohata, Kanako Nemoto, T. Iwatsubo
    Abstract:

    Abstract This paper presents a method for large-scale structural-Acoustic Analysis in which a cavity is divided into several Acoustic fields, and a transfer-function method is used to solve the Acoustics efficiently. By solving simultaneous equations using the Gaussian elimination method sequentially for each pair of neighboring Acoustic sub-fields, the calculation time and memory requirements are reduced. Calculation accuracy is the same as when calculating the entire Acoustic field without first dividing it. We created two kinds of closed Acoustic models (cavity models) and carried out numerical simulations. The results showed that the proposed method is effective for large-scale structural-Acoustic Analysis.

Rosalind L Smyth – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Validity and reliability of Acoustic Analysis of respiratory sounds in infants
    Archives of disease in childhood, 2004
    Co-Authors: Heather Elphick, Gillian Lancaster, A. Solis, A. Majumdar, Rishab Gupta, Rosalind L Smyth
    Abstract:

    Objective: To investigate the validity and reliability of computerised Acoustic Analysis in the detection of abnormal respiratory noises in infants. Methods: Blinded, prospective comparison of Acoustic Analysis with stethoscope examination. Validity and reliability of Acoustic Analysis were assessed by calculating the degree of observer agreement using the κ statistic with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: 102 infants under 18 months were recruited. Convergent validity for agreement between stethoscope examination and Acoustic Analysis was poor for wheeze (κ = 0.07 (95% CI, −0.13 to 0.26)) and rattles (κ = 0.11 (−0.05 to 0.27)) and fair for crackles (κ = 0.36 (0.18 to 0.54)). Both the stethoscope and Acoustic Analysis distinguished well between sounds (discriminant validity). Agreement between observers for the presence of wheeze was poor for both stethoscope examination and Acoustic Analysis. Agreement for rattles was moderate for the stethoscope but poor for Acoustic Analysis. Agreement for crackles was moderate using both techniques. Within-observer reliability for all sounds using Acoustic Analysis was moderate to good. Conclusions: The stethoscope is unreliable for assessing respiratory sounds in infants. This has important implications for its use as a diagnostic tool for lung disorders in infants, and confirms that it cannot be used as a gold standard. Because of the unreliability of the stethoscope, the validity of Acoustic Analysis could not be demonstrated, although it could discriminate between sounds well and showed good within-observer reliability. For Acoustic Analysis, targeted training and the development of computerised pattern recognition systems may improve reliability so that it can be used in clinical practice.

T. Iwatsubo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A Method for Large-Scale Structural-Acoustic Analysis
    Volume 1C: 16th Biennial Conference on Mechanical Vibration and Noise, 1997
    Co-Authors: Koki Shiohata, Kanako Nemoto, T. Iwatsubo
    Abstract:

    Abstract This paper presents a method for large-scale structural-Acoustic Analysis in which a cavity is divided into several Acoustic fields, and a transfer-function method is used to solve the Acoustics efficiently. By solving simultaneous equations using the Gaussian elimination method sequentially for each pair of neighboring Acoustic sub-fields, the calculation time and memory requirements are reduced. Calculation accuracy is the same as when calculating the entire Acoustic field without first dividing it. We created two kinds of closed Acoustic models (cavity models) and carried out numerical simulations. The results showed that the proposed method is effective for large-scale structural-Acoustic Analysis.

Heather Elphick – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Validity and reliability of Acoustic Analysis of respiratory sounds in infants
    Archives of disease in childhood, 2004
    Co-Authors: Heather Elphick, Gillian Lancaster, A. Solis, A. Majumdar, Rishab Gupta, Rosalind L Smyth
    Abstract:

    Objective: To investigate the validity and reliability of computerised Acoustic Analysis in the detection of abnormal respiratory noises in infants. Methods: Blinded, prospective comparison of Acoustic Analysis with stethoscope examination. Validity and reliability of Acoustic Analysis were assessed by calculating the degree of observer agreement using the κ statistic with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: 102 infants under 18 months were recruited. Convergent validity for agreement between stethoscope examination and Acoustic Analysis was poor for wheeze (κ = 0.07 (95% CI, −0.13 to 0.26)) and rattles (κ = 0.11 (−0.05 to 0.27)) and fair for crackles (κ = 0.36 (0.18 to 0.54)). Both the stethoscope and Acoustic Analysis distinguished well between sounds (discriminant validity). Agreement between observers for the presence of wheeze was poor for both stethoscope examination and Acoustic Analysis. Agreement for rattles was moderate for the stethoscope but poor for Acoustic Analysis. Agreement for crackles was moderate using both techniques. Within-observer reliability for all sounds using Acoustic Analysis was moderate to good. Conclusions: The stethoscope is unreliable for assessing respiratory sounds in infants. This has important implications for its use as a diagnostic tool for lung disorders in infants, and confirms that it cannot be used as a gold standard. Because of the unreliability of the stethoscope, the validity of Acoustic Analysis could not be demonstrated, although it could discriminate between sounds well and showed good within-observer reliability. For Acoustic Analysis, targeted training and the development of computerised pattern recognition systems may improve reliability so that it can be used in clinical practice.