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Acoustic Performance

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Javier Puentes – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • lime cement mortars for coating with improved thermal and Acoustic Performance
    Construction and Building Materials, 2015
    Co-Authors: Irene Palomar, Gonzalo Barluenga, Javier Puentes

    Abstract:

    Abstract Coating mortars can modify significantly the thermal and Acoustic Performance of buildings; reducing energy consumption and improving noise control on rehabilitation, meeting the current requirements, and new buildings. To improve thermal and Acoustic properties on lime–cement mortars, fulfilling other physical, mechanical and technical requirements, a gap-graded aggregate (GGA), three lightweight aggregates (LWA) (expanded clay, perlite and vermiculite) and fibers (cellulose and polypropylene) were used. The water to binder ratios were fixed in order to get a plastic consistency for all the fresh compositions. The experimental program assessed the influence of those components on free shrinkage and cracking at early age (24 h) and physical and mechanical properties, thermal conductivity and sound absorption coefficient on hardened mortar samples. A parametric analysis allowed to identify some relations linking water to binder ratio to open porosity, free shrinkage and cracking risk at early ages; apparent density to thermal conductivity of samples without fibers and open porosity to mechanical Performance and sound absorption coefficient. Lightweight aggregates and fibers showed a different behavior, especially on thermal and Acoustic Performance, because of a different pore structure. The combined effect of GGA, LWA and fibers improved thermal and Acoustic Performance of lime–cement mortars.

  • Lime–cement mortars for coating with improved thermal and Acoustic Performance
    Construction and Building Materials, 2015
    Co-Authors: Irene Palomar, Gonzalo Barluenga, Javier Puentes

    Abstract:

    Abstract Coating mortars can modify significantly the thermal and Acoustic Performance of buildings; reducing energy consumption and improving noise control on rehabilitation, meeting the current requirements, and new buildings. To improve thermal and Acoustic properties on lime–cement mortars, fulfilling other physical, mechanical and technical requirements, a gap-graded aggregate (GGA), three lightweight aggregates (LWA) (expanded clay, perlite and vermiculite) and fibers (cellulose and polypropylene) were used. The water to binder ratios were fixed in order to get a plastic consistency for all the fresh compositions. The experimental program assessed the influence of those components on free shrinkage and cracking at early age (24 h) and physical and mechanical properties, thermal conductivity and sound absorption coefficient on hardened mortar samples. A parametric analysis allowed to identify some relations linking water to binder ratio to open porosity, free shrinkage and cracking risk at early ages; apparent density to thermal conductivity of samples without fibers and open porosity to mechanical Performance and sound absorption coefficient. Lightweight aggregates and fibers showed a different behavior, especially on thermal and Acoustic Performance, because of a different pore structure. The combined effect of GGA, LWA and fibers improved thermal and Acoustic Performance of lime–cement mortars.

Irene Palomar – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • lime cement mortars for coating with improved thermal and Acoustic Performance
    Construction and Building Materials, 2015
    Co-Authors: Irene Palomar, Gonzalo Barluenga, Javier Puentes

    Abstract:

    Abstract Coating mortars can modify significantly the thermal and Acoustic Performance of buildings; reducing energy consumption and improving noise control on rehabilitation, meeting the current requirements, and new buildings. To improve thermal and Acoustic properties on lime–cement mortars, fulfilling other physical, mechanical and technical requirements, a gap-graded aggregate (GGA), three lightweight aggregates (LWA) (expanded clay, perlite and vermiculite) and fibers (cellulose and polypropylene) were used. The water to binder ratios were fixed in order to get a plastic consistency for all the fresh compositions. The experimental program assessed the influence of those components on free shrinkage and cracking at early age (24 h) and physical and mechanical properties, thermal conductivity and sound absorption coefficient on hardened mortar samples. A parametric analysis allowed to identify some relations linking water to binder ratio to open porosity, free shrinkage and cracking risk at early ages; apparent density to thermal conductivity of samples without fibers and open porosity to mechanical Performance and sound absorption coefficient. Lightweight aggregates and fibers showed a different behavior, especially on thermal and Acoustic Performance, because of a different pore structure. The combined effect of GGA, LWA and fibers improved thermal and Acoustic Performance of lime–cement mortars.

  • Lime–cement mortars for coating with improved thermal and Acoustic Performance
    Construction and Building Materials, 2015
    Co-Authors: Irene Palomar, Gonzalo Barluenga, Javier Puentes

    Abstract:

    Abstract Coating mortars can modify significantly the thermal and Acoustic Performance of buildings; reducing energy consumption and improving noise control on rehabilitation, meeting the current requirements, and new buildings. To improve thermal and Acoustic properties on lime–cement mortars, fulfilling other physical, mechanical and technical requirements, a gap-graded aggregate (GGA), three lightweight aggregates (LWA) (expanded clay, perlite and vermiculite) and fibers (cellulose and polypropylene) were used. The water to binder ratios were fixed in order to get a plastic consistency for all the fresh compositions. The experimental program assessed the influence of those components on free shrinkage and cracking at early age (24 h) and physical and mechanical properties, thermal conductivity and sound absorption coefficient on hardened mortar samples. A parametric analysis allowed to identify some relations linking water to binder ratio to open porosity, free shrinkage and cracking risk at early ages; apparent density to thermal conductivity of samples without fibers and open porosity to mechanical Performance and sound absorption coefficient. Lightweight aggregates and fibers showed a different behavior, especially on thermal and Acoustic Performance, because of a different pore structure. The combined effect of GGA, LWA and fibers improved thermal and Acoustic Performance of lime–cement mortars.

G Pilmoor – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • winter indoor air quality thermal comfort and Acoustic Performance of newly built secondary schools in england
    Building and Environment, 2009
    Co-Authors: Dejan Mumovic, Jason Palmer, M Davies, M Orme, I Ridley, T Oreszczyn, C Judd, R Critchlow, H A Medina, G Pilmoor

    Abstract:

    Previous studies have found that classrooms are often inadequately ventilated, with the resultant increased risk of negative impacts on the pupils. This paper describes a series of field measurements that investigated the indoor air quality, thermal comfort and Acoustic Performance of nine recently built secondary schools in England. The most significant conclusion is that the complex interaction between ventilation, thermal comfort and Acoustics presents considerable challenges for designers. The study showed that while the Acoustic standards are demanding it was possible to achieve natural ventilation designs that met the criteria for indoor ambient noise levels when external noise levels were not excessive. Most classrooms in the sample met the requirement of limiting the daily average CO2 concentration to below 1500 ppm but just a few met the need to readily provide 8 l/s per person of fresh air under the easy control of the occupants. It would seem that the basic requirement of 1500 ppm of CO2 is achieved as a consequence of the window areas being just sufficient to provide the minimum of 3 l/s per person at low and intermittent occupancy. Thermal comfort in the monitored classrooms was mostly acceptable but temperatures tended to be much higher in practice than the design assumed.