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Acoustic Tag

The Experts below are selected from a list of 216 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Christopher G Lowe – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • IROS – Acoustic Tag State Estimation with Unsynchronized Hydrophones on AUVs
    2018 IEEE RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), 2018
    Co-Authors: Tianyi Ma, Christopher M Clark, Eyassu Shimelis, Charles Van Eijk, Christopher G Lowe

    Abstract:

    This paper presents an underwater robotic sensor system for localizing Acoustic transmitters when the robot’s hydrophones cannot be time-synchronized. The development of the system is motivated by applications where tracking of marine animals that are Tagged with an underwater Acoustic transmitter is required. The system uses two novel real-time calibration algorithms that improve the accuracy of time of flight (TOF) and time difference of arrival (TDOA) measurements. The first algorithm corrects non-linear clock skews in TOF measurements based on temperature variation. The second algorithm compensates the localized relative clock skew between clocks using a mixed integer linear program. To validate the system’s performance, an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) was deployed to track a moving Tag where GPS data was used as ground truth. Compared to traditional TOF and TDOA filtering methods, the results show that the proposed system can achieve reduction of mean localization errors by 59%, and a reduction of the standard deviation of measurements by 44%.

  • Acoustic Tag State Estimation with Unsynchronized Hydrophones on AUVs
    2018 IEEE RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), 2018
    Co-Authors: Eyassu Shimelis, Christopher M Clark, Charles Van Eijk, Christopher G Lowe

    Abstract:

    This paper presents an underwater robotic sensor system for localizing Acoustic transmitters when the robot’s hydrophones cannot be time-synchronized. The development of the system is motivated by applications where tracking of marine animals that are Tagged with an underwater Acoustic transmitter is required. The system uses two novel real-time calibration algorithms that improve the accuracy of time of flight (TOF) and time difference of arrival (TDOA) measurements. The first algorithm corrects non-linear clock skews in TOF measurements based on temperature variation. The second algorithm compensates the localized relative clock skew between clocks using a mixed integer linear program. To validate the system’s performance, an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) was deployed to track a moving Tag where GPS data was used as ground truth. Compared to traditional TOF and TDOA filtering methods, the results show that the proposed system can achieve reduction of mean localization errors by 59%, and a reduction of the standard deviation of measurements by 44%.

  • a multi autonomous underwater vehicle system for autonomous tracking of marine life
    Journal of Field Robotics, 2017
    Co-Authors: Yukun Lin, Jerry Hsiung, Richard Piersall, Connor F. White, Christopher G Lowe, Christopher M Clark

    Abstract:

    This paper presents a multi-autonomous underwater vehicle system capable of cooperatively and autonomously tracking and following marine targets (i.e., fish) Tagged with an Acoustic transmitter. The AUVs have been equipped with stereo-hydrophones that receive signals broadcasted by the Acoustic transmitter Tags to enable real-time calculation of bearing-to-Tag and distance-to-Tag measurements. These measurements are shared between AUVs via Acoustic modem and fused within each AUV’s particle filter for estimating the target’s position. The AUVs use a leader/follower multi-AUV control system to enable the AUVs to drive toward the estimated target state by following collision-free paths. Once within the local area of the target, the AUVs circumnavigate the target state until it moves to another area. The system builds on previous work by incorporating a new SmartTag package that can be attached to an individual’s dorsal fin. The SmartTag houses a full inertial measurement unit (INU), video logger, Acoustic transmitter, and timed release mechanism. After real-time AUV tracking experiments, the SmartTag is recovered. Logged IMU data are fused with logged AUV-obtained Acoustic Tag measurements within a particle filter to improve state estimation accuracy. This improvement is validated through a series of multi-AUV shark and boat tracking experiments conducted at Santa Catalina Island, California. When compared with previous work that did not use the SmartTag package, results demonstrated a decrease in mean position estimation error of 25–75%, Tag orientation estimation errors dropped from 80° to 30° , the sensitivity of mean position error with respect to distance to the Tag was less by a factor of 50, and the sensitivity of mean position error with respect to Acoustic signal reception frequency to the Tag was 25 times less. These statistics demonstrate a large improvement in the system’s robustness when the SmartTag package is used.

Christopher M Clark – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • IROS – Acoustic Tag State Estimation with Unsynchronized Hydrophones on AUVs
    2018 IEEE RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), 2018
    Co-Authors: Tianyi Ma, Christopher M Clark, Eyassu Shimelis, Charles Van Eijk, Christopher G Lowe

    Abstract:

    This paper presents an underwater robotic sensor system for localizing Acoustic transmitters when the robot’s hydrophones cannot be time-synchronized. The development of the system is motivated by applications where tracking of marine animals that are Tagged with an underwater Acoustic transmitter is required. The system uses two novel real-time calibration algorithms that improve the accuracy of time of flight (TOF) and time difference of arrival (TDOA) measurements. The first algorithm corrects non-linear clock skews in TOF measurements based on temperature variation. The second algorithm compensates the localized relative clock skew between clocks using a mixed integer linear program. To validate the system’s performance, an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) was deployed to track a moving Tag where GPS data was used as ground truth. Compared to traditional TOF and TDOA filtering methods, the results show that the proposed system can achieve reduction of mean localization errors by 59%, and a reduction of the standard deviation of measurements by 44%.

  • Acoustic Tag State Estimation with Unsynchronized Hydrophones on AUVs
    2018 IEEE RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), 2018
    Co-Authors: Eyassu Shimelis, Christopher M Clark, Charles Van Eijk, Christopher G Lowe

    Abstract:

    This paper presents an underwater robotic sensor system for localizing Acoustic transmitters when the robot’s hydrophones cannot be time-synchronized. The development of the system is motivated by applications where tracking of marine animals that are Tagged with an underwater Acoustic transmitter is required. The system uses two novel real-time calibration algorithms that improve the accuracy of time of flight (TOF) and time difference of arrival (TDOA) measurements. The first algorithm corrects non-linear clock skews in TOF measurements based on temperature variation. The second algorithm compensates the localized relative clock skew between clocks using a mixed integer linear program. To validate the system’s performance, an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) was deployed to track a moving Tag where GPS data was used as ground truth. Compared to traditional TOF and TDOA filtering methods, the results show that the proposed system can achieve reduction of mean localization errors by 59%, and a reduction of the standard deviation of measurements by 44%.

  • a multi autonomous underwater vehicle system for autonomous tracking of marine life
    Journal of Field Robotics, 2017
    Co-Authors: Yukun Lin, Jerry Hsiung, Richard Piersall, Connor F. White, Christopher G Lowe, Christopher M Clark

    Abstract:

    This paper presents a multi-autonomous underwater vehicle system capable of cooperatively and autonomously tracking and following marine targets (i.e., fish) Tagged with an Acoustic transmitter. The AUVs have been equipped with stereo-hydrophones that receive signals broadcasted by the Acoustic transmitter Tags to enable real-time calculation of bearing-to-Tag and distance-to-Tag measurements. These measurements are shared between AUVs via Acoustic modem and fused within each AUV’s particle filter for estimating the target’s position. The AUVs use a leader/follower multi-AUV control system to enable the AUVs to drive toward the estimated target state by following collision-free paths. Once within the local area of the target, the AUVs circumnavigate the target state until it moves to another area. The system builds on previous work by incorporating a new SmartTag package that can be attached to an individual’s dorsal fin. The SmartTag houses a full inertial measurement unit (INU), video logger, Acoustic transmitter, and timed release mechanism. After real-time AUV tracking experiments, the SmartTag is recovered. Logged IMU data are fused with logged AUV-obtained Acoustic Tag measurements within a particle filter to improve state estimation accuracy. This improvement is validated through a series of multi-AUV shark and boat tracking experiments conducted at Santa Catalina Island, California. When compared with previous work that did not use the SmartTag package, results demonstrated a decrease in mean position estimation error of 25–75%, Tag orientation estimation errors dropped from 80° to 30° , the sensitivity of mean position error with respect to distance to the Tag was less by a factor of 50, and the sensitivity of mean position error with respect to Acoustic signal reception frequency to the Tag was 25 times less. These statistics demonstrate a large improvement in the system’s robustness when the SmartTag package is used.

Steven L. Whitlock – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • vitality models found useful in modeling Tag failure times in Acoustic Tag survival studies
    Animal Biotelemetry, 2020
    Co-Authors: John R. Skalski, Steven L. Whitlock

    Abstract:

    Acoustic telemetry studies often rely on the assumption that premature Tag failure does not affect the validity of inferences. However, in some cases this assumption is possibly or likely invalid and it is necessary to apply a correction to estimation procedures. The question of which approaches and specific models are best suited to modeling Acoustic Tag failures has received little research attention. In this short communication, we present a meta-analysis of 42 Acoustic Tag-life studies, originally used to correct survival studies involving outmigrating juvenile salmonids in the Columbia/Snake river basin. We compare the performance of nine alternative parametric models including common failure–time/survival models and the vitality models of Li and Anderson Theor Popul Biol 76:118–131, (2009) and Demogr Res 28:341–372, (2013). The Tag-life studies used Acoustic Tags from three different Tag manufacturers, had expected lifetimes between 12 and 61 days, and had dry weights ranging from 0.22 to 1.65 g. In 57% of the cases, the vitality models of Li and Anderson Theor Popul Biol 76:118–131, (2009) and Demogr Res 28:341–372, (2013) fit the Tag-failure times best. The vitality models were also the second-best choices in 17% of the cases. Together, the vitality models, log-logistic, (19%), and gamma models (14%) accounted for 90% of the models selected. Unlike more traditional failure–time models (e.g., Weibull, Gompertz, gamma, and log-logistic), the vitality models are capable of characterizing both the early onset of Tag failure due to manufacturing errors and the anticipated battery life. We provide further guidance on appropriate sample sizes (50–100 Tags) and procedures to be considered when applying precise Tag-life corrections in release–recapture survival studies.

  • Vitality Models Found Useful in Modeling Tag-Failure Times in AcousticTag Survival Studies
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: John R. Skalski, Steven L. Whitlock

    Abstract:

    Abstract
    Acoustic telemetry studies often rely on the assumption that premature Tag failure does not affect the validity of inferences. However, in some cases this assumption is possibly or likely invalid and it is necessary to apply a correction to estimation procedures. The question of which approaches and specific models are best suited to modeling Acoustic Tag failures has received little research attention. In this short communication, we present a meta-analysis of 42 Acoustic Tag-life studies, originally used to correct survival studies involving outmigrating juvenile salmonids in the Columbia/Snake river basin. We compare the performance of nine alternative parametric models including common failure-time/survival models and the vitality models of Li and Anderson (2009 and 2013). The Tag-life studies used Acoustic Tags from three different Tag manufacturers, had expected lifetimes between 12 and 61 days, and had dry weights ranging from 0.22 to 1.65 grams. In 57% of the cases, the vitality models of Li and Anderson (2009 and 2013) fit the Tag failure-times best. The vitality models were also the second-best choices in 17% of the cases. Together, the vitality models, log-logistic, (19%), and gamma models (14%) accounted for 90% of the models selected. Unlike more traditional failure-time models (e.g., Weibull, Gompertz, gamma, and log-logistic), the vitality models are capable of characterizing both the early onset of Tag failure due to manufacturing errors and the anticipated battery life. We provide further guidance on appropriate sample sizes (50–100 Tags) and procedures to be considered when applying precise Tag-life corrections in release-recapture survival studies.

  • Vitality Models Found Useful in Modeling Tag-Failure Times in AcousticTag Survival Studies
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: John R. Skalski, Steven L. Whitlock

    Abstract:

    Abstract
    Acoustic telemetry studies often rely on the assumption that premature Tag failure does not affect the validity of inferences. However, in some cases this assumption is possibly or likely invalid and it is necessary to apply a correction to estimation procedures. The question of which approaches and specific models are best suited to modeling Acoustic Tag failures has received little research attention. In this short communication, we present a meta-analysis of 42 Acoustic Tag-life studies, originally used to correct survival studies involving outmigrating juvenile salmonids in the Columbia/Snake river basin. We compare the performance of nine alternative parametric models including common failure-time/survival models and vitality models of Li and Anderson (2009 and 2013), which characterize demographic heterogeneity in the mortality of populations. The Tag-life studies used Acoustic Tags from three different Tag manufacturers, had expected lifetimes between 12 and 61 days, and had dry weights ranging from 0.22 to 1.65 grams. In 57% of the cases, the vitality models of Li and Anderson (2009 and 2013) fit the Tag failure-times best. The vitality models were also the second-best choices in 17% of the cases. Together, the vitality models, log-logistic, (19%), and gamma models (14%) accounted for 90% of the models selected. Unlike more traditional failure-time models, the vitality models are capable of characterizing both the early onset of Tag failure due to manufacturing errors and the anticipated battery life. We provide further guidance on appropriate sample sizes (50–100 Tags) and procedures to be considered when applying precise Tag-life corrections in release-recapture survival studies.