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Tadej Battelino – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • motor activity during asymptomatic nocturnal hypoglycemia in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus
    Acta Diabetologica, 2004
    Co-Authors: I Radan, E Rajer, Ursic N Bratina, David Neubauer, Ciril Kržisnik, Tadej Battelino

    Abstract:

    Nocturnal hypoglycemia is reported in 13%–56% of adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. It may be asymptomatic in more than 50% of patients. No noninvasive method for detecting asymptomatic nocturnal hypoglycemia (ANH) has so far proven successful. The aim of the present study was to evaluate quantitative changes of motor activity by Actigraphy during episodes of ANH in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. A total of 18 patients aged 10–16 years with a history of ANH were investigated. Blood was sampled at half-hourly intervals between 22.30 and 06.00 hours with a micropump, and an Actigraph was fastened to the right wrist. Blood glucose concentrations were measured and compared to motor activity. Nocturnal hypoglycemia was recorded in 10 patients (55%), with blood glucose during periods of hypoglycemia of 3.00+0.17 mmol/l (range, 1.2–3.4 mmol/l), and duration of hypoglycemia of 1.95+1.34 hours (range, 0.5–5.0 hours). All periods of hypoglycemia were clinically asymptomatic. Regression analysis revealed a statistically significant linear correlation (p=0.03) between blood glucose concentration and the respective 30-min activity counts. Activity counts in patients with nocturnal hypoglycemia were significantly (ANOVA, p<0.02) higher than in patients with normoglycemia. We conclude that low blood glucose was significantly correlated with an increase in motor activity as detected by Actigraphy. This implies the possibility of noninvasive screening of asymptomatic nocturnal hypoglycemia.

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  • Motor activity during asymptomatic nocturnal hypoglycemia in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus
    Acta Diabetologica, 2004
    Co-Authors: I Radan, E Rajer, David Neubauer, Ciril Kržisnik, N. Uršič Bratina, Tadej Battelino

    Abstract:

    Nocturnal hypoglycemia is reported in 13%–56% of adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. It may be asymptomatic in more than 50% of patients. No noninvasive method for detecting asymptomatic nocturnal hypoglycemia (ANH) has so far proven successful. The aim of the present study was to evaluate quantitative changes of motor activity by Actigraphy during episodes of ANH in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. A total of 18 patients aged 10–16 years with a history of ANH were investigated. Blood was sampled at half-hourly intervals between 22.30 and 06.00 hours with a micropump, and an Actigraph was fastened to the right wrist. Blood glucose concentrations were measured and compared to motor activity. Nocturnal hypoglycemia was recorded in 10 patients (55%), with blood glucose during periods of hypoglycemia of 3.00+0.17 mmol/l (range, 1.2–3.4 mmol/l), and duration of hypoglycemia of 1.95+1.34 hours (range, 0.5–5.0 hours). All periods of hypoglycemia were clinically asymptomatic. Regression analysis revealed a statistically significant linear correlation ( p =0.03) between blood glucose concentration and the respective 30-min activity counts. Activity counts in patients with nocturnal hypoglycemia were significantly (ANOVA, p

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Peter Hauri – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Actigraphic assessment of sleep in insomnia: application of the Actigraph Data Analysis Software (ADAS).
    Physiology & behavior, 1999
    Co-Authors: Girardin Jean-louis, Ferdinand Zizi, Hans Von Gizycki, Peter Hauri

    Abstract:

    The usefulness of the Actigraph methodology has been demonstrated in normal individuals. However, the validity of Actigraphy has been questioned in insomnia patients because of the considerable measurement error that has been reported between Actigraphy (ACT) and polysomnography (PSG). Two independent investigations have reported errors of 48 and 49 min in total sleep time between ACT and PSG. With a new scoring method called the Actigraph Data Analysis Software, a reanalysis of one of these studies was conducted. Based on this reanalysis, we have obtained a measurement error of only 25 min between the two methods. This finding may be an indication of the advantage of this new scoring method. A strong correlation coefficient (r = 0.82, p < 0.0001) was noted between ACT and PSG for total sleep time, thus suggesting a high degree of accuracy of the Actigraph methodology in assessing the sleep/wake profile of insomniacs.

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  • Actigraphic assessment of sleep in insomnia: application of the Actigraph Data Analysis Software (ADAS).
    Physiology & Behavior, 1998
    Co-Authors: Girardin Jean-louis, Ferdinand Zizi, Hans Von Gizycki, Peter Hauri

    Abstract:

    Abstract JEAN-LOUIS, G., F. ZIZI, H. VON GIZYCKI AND P. HAURI. Actigraphic Assessment of Sleep in Insomnia: Application of The Actigraph Data Analysis Software (ADAS) . PHARMACOL BIOCHEM BEHAV 65 (4/5)659–663, 1998.—The usefulness of the Actigraph methodology has been demonstrated in normal individuals. However, the validity of Actigraphy has been questioned in insomnia patients because of the considerable measurement error that has been reported between Actigraphy (ACT) and polysomnography (PSG). Two independent investigations have reported errors of 48 and 49 min in total sleep time between ACT and PSG. With a new scoring method called the Actigraph Data Analysis Software, a reanalysis of one of these studies was conducted. Based on this reanalysis, we have obtained a measurement error of only 25 min between the two methods. This finding may be an indication of the advantage of this new scoring method. A strong correlation coefficient (r = 0.82, p

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  • THE Actigraph DATA ANALYSIS SOFTWARE: I. A NOVEL APPROACH TO SCORING AND INTERPRETING SLEEP-WAKE ACTIVITY
    Perceptual and Motor Skills, 1997
    Co-Authors: Girardin Jean-louis, Peter Hauri, Ferdinand Zizi, Hans Von Gizycki, Arthur J. Spielman, Harvey B. Taub

    Abstract:

    Decades of empirical observations have established the validity of Actigraphy primarily in individuals without sleep disorders. Methodological problems encountered thus far coupled with the widespread use of Actigraphy signal the need for concentrated efforts to establish a consensus regarding scoring procedures. Currently available scoring methods show less reliability in clinical populations. To address these issues two validation studies were conducted: one for individuals without sleep disorders and the other for patients diagnosed with insomnia. The results of these two studies using the Actigraph Data Analysis Software as the scoring method have shown that the described system is fairly precise. It can be used for Actigraphs with different features and mode of operation and is applicable to individuals with insomnia. These findings corroborate previous research showing that Actigraphy is a valid instrument for assessment of sleep and wakefulness.

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I Radan – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • motor activity during asymptomatic nocturnal hypoglycemia in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus
    Acta Diabetologica, 2004
    Co-Authors: I Radan, E Rajer, Ursic N Bratina, David Neubauer, Ciril Kržisnik, Tadej Battelino

    Abstract:

    Nocturnal hypoglycemia is reported in 13%–56% of adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. It may be asymptomatic in more than 50% of patients. No noninvasive method for detecting asymptomatic nocturnal hypoglycemia (ANH) has so far proven successful. The aim of the present study was to evaluate quantitative changes of motor activity by Actigraphy during episodes of ANH in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. A total of 18 patients aged 10–16 years with a history of ANH were investigated. Blood was sampled at half-hourly intervals between 22.30 and 06.00 hours with a micropump, and an Actigraph was fastened to the right wrist. Blood glucose concentrations were measured and compared to motor activity. Nocturnal hypoglycemia was recorded in 10 patients (55%), with blood glucose during periods of hypoglycemia of 3.00+0.17 mmol/l (range, 1.2–3.4 mmol/l), and duration of hypoglycemia of 1.95+1.34 hours (range, 0.5–5.0 hours). All periods of hypoglycemia were clinically asymptomatic. Regression analysis revealed a statistically significant linear correlation (p=0.03) between blood glucose concentration and the respective 30-min activity counts. Activity counts in patients with nocturnal hypoglycemia were significantly (ANOVA, p<0.02) higher than in patients with normoglycemia. We conclude that low blood glucose was significantly correlated with an increase in motor activity as detected by Actigraphy. This implies the possibility of noninvasive screening of asymptomatic nocturnal hypoglycemia.

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  • Motor activity during asymptomatic nocturnal hypoglycemia in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus
    Acta Diabetologica, 2004
    Co-Authors: I Radan, E Rajer, David Neubauer, Ciril Kržisnik, N. Uršič Bratina, Tadej Battelino

    Abstract:

    Nocturnal hypoglycemia is reported in 13%–56% of adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. It may be asymptomatic in more than 50% of patients. No noninvasive method for detecting asymptomatic nocturnal hypoglycemia (ANH) has so far proven successful. The aim of the present study was to evaluate quantitative changes of motor activity by Actigraphy during episodes of ANH in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. A total of 18 patients aged 10–16 years with a history of ANH were investigated. Blood was sampled at half-hourly intervals between 22.30 and 06.00 hours with a micropump, and an Actigraph was fastened to the right wrist. Blood glucose concentrations were measured and compared to motor activity. Nocturnal hypoglycemia was recorded in 10 patients (55%), with blood glucose during periods of hypoglycemia of 3.00+0.17 mmol/l (range, 1.2–3.4 mmol/l), and duration of hypoglycemia of 1.95+1.34 hours (range, 0.5–5.0 hours). All periods of hypoglycemia were clinically asymptomatic. Regression analysis revealed a statistically significant linear correlation ( p =0.03) between blood glucose concentration and the respective 30-min activity counts. Activity counts in patients with nocturnal hypoglycemia were significantly (ANOVA, p

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