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Actinomycetaceae

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Kirstine Klitgaard – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Revisiting bovine pyometra—New insights into the disease using a culture-independent deep sequencing approach
    Veterinary Microbiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Lif Rødtness Vesterby Knudsen, Cecilia Christensen Karstrup, Hanne Gervi Pedersen, Jørgen S. Agerholm, Tim Kåre Jensen, Kirstine Klitgaard

    Abstract:

    The bacteria present in the uterus during pyometra have previously been studied using bacteriological culturing. These studies identified Fusobacterium necrophorum and Trueperella pyogenes as the major contributors to the pathogenesis of pyometra. However, an increasing number of culture-independent studies have demonstrated that the bacterial diversity in most environments is underestimated in culture-based studies. Consequently, fastidious pyometra-associated pathogens may have been overlooked. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to investigate the diversity of bacteria in the uterus of cows with pyometra by using culture-independent 16S rRNA PCR combined with next generation sequencing. We investigated the microbial composition in the uterus of 21 cows with pyometra, which were obtained from a Danish slaughterhouse. Similar to the observations from the culture studies, Fusobacteriaceae, the family that F. necrophorum belongs to, was the operational taxonomic unit (OTU) observed in the largest quantities. By contrast, the Actinomycetaceae family, which includes T. pyogenes, constituted only 1% of the total number of reads. Thus we cannot confirm the previously reported role of species from this family in the pathogenesis of pyometra. Finally, we identified a large number of sequences representing three families of Gram-negative bacteria in the pyometra samples: Porphyromonadaceae, Mycoplasmataceae, and Pasteurellaceae. It is likely that these families comprise potential pathogenic species of a fastidious nature, which have been overlooked in previous studies. Our results increase the knowledge of the complexity of the pyometra microbiota and suggest that pathogens in addition to F. necrophorum may be involved in the pathogenesis of pyometra.

  • Revisiting bovine pyometra–new insights into the disease using a culture-independent deep sequencing approach.
    Veterinary microbiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Lif Rødtness Vesterby Knudsen, Cecilia Christensen Karstrup, Hanne Gervi Pedersen, Jørgen S. Agerholm, Tim Kåre Jensen, Kirstine Klitgaard

    Abstract:

    The bacteria present in the uterus during pyometra have previously been studied using bacteriological culturing. These studies identified Fusobacterium necrophorum and Trueperella pyogenes as the major contributors to the pathogenesis of pyometra. However, an increasing number of culture-independent studies have demonstrated that the bacterial diversity in most environments is underestimated in culture-based studies. Consequently, fastidious pyometra-associated pathogens may have been overlooked. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to investigate the diversity of bacteria in the uterus of cows with pyometra by using culture-independent 16S rRNA PCR combined with next generation sequencing. We investigated the microbial composition in the uterus of 21 cows with pyometra, which were obtained from a Danish slaughterhouse. Similar to the observations from the culture studies, Fusobacteriaceae, the family that F. necrophorum belongs to, was the operational taxonomic unit (OTU) observed in the largest quantities. By contrast, the Actinomycetaceae family, which includes T. pyogenes, constituted only 1% of the total number of reads. Thus we cannot confirm the previously reported role of species from this family in the pathogenesis of pyometra. Finally, we identified a large number of sequences representing three families of Gram-negative bacteria in the pyometra samples: Porphyromonadaceae, Mycoplasmataceae, and Pasteurellaceae. It is likely that these families comprise potential pathogenic species of a fastidious nature, which have been overlooked in previous studies. Our results increase the knowledge of the complexity of the pyometra microbiota and suggest that pathogens in addition to F. necrophorum may be involved in the pathogenesis of pyometra.

Chris Detter – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Standards in Genomic Sciences (2010) 3:126-135 DOI:10.4056/sigs.1123072 The Genomic Standards Consortium Complete genome sequence of Arcanobacterium haemolyticum type strain (11018T)
    , 2015
    Co-Authors: Montri Yasawong, Hazuki Teshima, Alla Lapidus, Matt Nolan, Susan Lucas, Glavina Del Rio, Hope Tice, Jan-fang Cheng, David Bruce, Chris Detter

    Abstract:

    cies of the genus Arcanobacterium, which belongs to the family Actinomycetaceae. The strain is of interest because it is an obligate parasite of the pharynx of humans and farm ani-mal; occasionally, it causes pharyngeal or skin lesions. It is a Gram-positive, nonmotile and non-sporulating bacterium. The strain described in this study was isolated from infections amongst American soldiers of certain islands of the North and West Pacific. This is the first completed sequence of a member of the genus Arcanobacterium and the ninth type strain genome from the family Actinomycetaceae. The 1,986,154 bp long genome with its 1,821 protein-coding and 64 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria an

  • Complete genome sequence of Arcanobacterium haemolyticum type strain (11018 T )
    Standards in genomic sciences, 2010
    Co-Authors: Montri Yasawong, Hazuki Teshima, Alla Lapidus, Matt Nolan, Susan Lucas, Hope Tice, Jan-fang Cheng, David Bruce, Tijana Glavina Del Rio, Chris Detter

    Abstract:

    Arcanobacterium haemolyticum (ex MacLean et al. 1946) Collins et al. 1983 is the type species of the genus Arcanobacterium, which belongs to the family Actinomycetaceae. The strain is of interest because it is an obligate parasite of the pharynx of humans and farm animal; occasionally, it causes pharyngeal or skin lesions. It is a Gram-positive, nonmotile and non-sporulating bacterium. The strain described in this study was isolated from infections amongst American soldiers of certain islands of the North and West Pacific. This is the first completed sequence of a member of the genus Arcanobacterium and the ninth type strain genome from the family Actinomycetaceae. The 1,986,154 bp long genome with its 1,821 protein-coding and 64 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  • Complete genome sequence of Arcanobacterium haemolyticum type strain (11018^T)
    Standards in Genomic Sciences, 2010
    Co-Authors: Montri Yasawong, Hazuki Teshima, Alla Lapidus, Matt Nolan, Susan Lucas, Hope Tice, Jan-fang Cheng, David Bruce, Tijana Glavina Del Rio, Chris Detter

    Abstract:

    Arcanobacterium haemolyticum (ex MacLean et al. 1946) Collins et al. 1983 is the type species of the genus Arcanobacterium , which belongs to the family Actinomycetaceae . The strain is of interest because it is an obligate parasite of the pharynx of humans and farm animal; occasionally, it causes pharyngeal or skin lesions. It is a Gram-positive, nonmotile and non-sporulating bacterium. The strain described in this study was isolated from infections amongst American soldiers of certain islands of the North and West Pacific. This is the first completed sequence of a member of the genus Arcanobacterium and the ninth type strain genome from the family Actinomycetaceae . The 1,986,154 bp long genome with its 1,821 protein-coding and 64 RNA genes is a part of the G enomic E ncyclopedia of B acteria and A rchaea project.

Lif Rødtness Vesterby Knudsen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Revisiting bovine pyometra—New insights into the disease using a culture-independent deep sequencing approach
    Veterinary Microbiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Lif Rødtness Vesterby Knudsen, Cecilia Christensen Karstrup, Hanne Gervi Pedersen, Jørgen S. Agerholm, Tim Kåre Jensen, Kirstine Klitgaard

    Abstract:

    The bacteria present in the uterus during pyometra have previously been studied using bacteriological culturing. These studies identified Fusobacterium necrophorum and Trueperella pyogenes as the major contributors to the pathogenesis of pyometra. However, an increasing number of culture-independent studies have demonstrated that the bacterial diversity in most environments is underestimated in culture-based studies. Consequently, fastidious pyometra-associated pathogens may have been overlooked. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to investigate the diversity of bacteria in the uterus of cows with pyometra by using culture-independent 16S rRNA PCR combined with next generation sequencing. We investigated the microbial composition in the uterus of 21 cows with pyometra, which were obtained from a Danish slaughterhouse. Similar to the observations from the culture studies, Fusobacteriaceae, the family that F. necrophorum belongs to, was the operational taxonomic unit (OTU) observed in the largest quantities. By contrast, the Actinomycetaceae family, which includes T. pyogenes, constituted only 1% of the total number of reads. Thus we cannot confirm the previously reported role of species from this family in the pathogenesis of pyometra. Finally, we identified a large number of sequences representing three families of Gram-negative bacteria in the pyometra samples: Porphyromonadaceae, Mycoplasmataceae, and Pasteurellaceae. It is likely that these families comprise potential pathogenic species of a fastidious nature, which have been overlooked in previous studies. Our results increase the knowledge of the complexity of the pyometra microbiota and suggest that pathogens in addition to F. necrophorum may be involved in the pathogenesis of pyometra.

  • Revisiting bovine pyometra–new insights into the disease using a culture-independent deep sequencing approach.
    Veterinary microbiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Lif Rødtness Vesterby Knudsen, Cecilia Christensen Karstrup, Hanne Gervi Pedersen, Jørgen S. Agerholm, Tim Kåre Jensen, Kirstine Klitgaard

    Abstract:

    The bacteria present in the uterus during pyometra have previously been studied using bacteriological culturing. These studies identified Fusobacterium necrophorum and Trueperella pyogenes as the major contributors to the pathogenesis of pyometra. However, an increasing number of culture-independent studies have demonstrated that the bacterial diversity in most environments is underestimated in culture-based studies. Consequently, fastidious pyometra-associated pathogens may have been overlooked. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to investigate the diversity of bacteria in the uterus of cows with pyometra by using culture-independent 16S rRNA PCR combined with next generation sequencing. We investigated the microbial composition in the uterus of 21 cows with pyometra, which were obtained from a Danish slaughterhouse. Similar to the observations from the culture studies, Fusobacteriaceae, the family that F. necrophorum belongs to, was the operational taxonomic unit (OTU) observed in the largest quantities. By contrast, the Actinomycetaceae family, which includes T. pyogenes, constituted only 1% of the total number of reads. Thus we cannot confirm the previously reported role of species from this family in the pathogenesis of pyometra. Finally, we identified a large number of sequences representing three families of Gram-negative bacteria in the pyometra samples: Porphyromonadaceae, Mycoplasmataceae, and Pasteurellaceae. It is likely that these families comprise potential pathogenic species of a fastidious nature, which have been overlooked in previous studies. Our results increase the knowledge of the complexity of the pyometra microbiota and suggest that pathogens in addition to F. necrophorum may be involved in the pathogenesis of pyometra.