Action Tendency - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Action Tendency

The Experts below are selected from a list of 150 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Action Tendency – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Colin Macleod – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the effect of approach avoidance training on alcohol consumption is mediated by change in alcohol Action Tendency
    PLOS ONE, 2014
    Co-Authors: Jason M. Sharbanee, Werner G. K. Stritzke, Reinout W. Wiers, Mike Rinck, Colin Macleod
    Abstract:

    Training people to respond to alcohol images by making avoidance joystick movements can affect subsequent alcohol consumption, and has shown initial efficacy as a treatment adjunct. However, the mechanisms that underlie the training’s efficacy are unknown. The present study aimed to determine 1) whether the training’s effect is mediated by a change in Action Tendency or a change in selective attention, and 2) whether the training’s effect is moderated by individual differences in working memory capacity (WMC). Three groups of social drinkers (total N = 74) completed either approach-alcohol training, avoid-alcohol training or a sham-training on the Approach-Avoidance Task (AAT). Participants’ WMC was assessed prior to training, while their alcohol-related Action Tendency and selective attention were assessed before and after the training on the recently developed Selective-Attention/Action Tendency Task (SA/ATT), before finally completing an alcohol taste-test. There was no significant main effect of approach/avoidance training on alcohol consumption during the taste-test. However, there was a significant indirect effect of training on alcohol consumption mediated by a change in Action Tendency, but no indirect effect mediated by a change in selective attention. There was inconsistent evidence of WMC moderating training efficacy, with moderation found only for the effect of approach-alcohol training on the AAT but not on the SA/ATT. Thus approach/avoidance training affects alcohol consumption specifically by changing the underlying Action Tendency. Multiple training sessions may be required in order to observe more substantive changes in drinking behaviour.

  • The effect of approach/avoidance training on alcohol consumption is mediated by change in alcohol Action Tendency
    PloS one, 2014
    Co-Authors: Jason M. Sharbanee, Werner G. K. Stritzke, Reinout W. Wiers, Mike Rinck, Colin Macleod
    Abstract:

    Training people to respond to alcohol images by making avoidance joystick movements can affect subsequent alcohol consumption, and has shown initial efficacy as a treatment adjunct. However, the mechanisms that underlie the training’s efficacy are unknown. The present study aimed to determine 1) whether the training’s effect is mediated by a change in Action Tendency or a change in selective attention, and 2) whether the training’s effect is moderated by individual differences in working memory capacity (WMC). Three groups of social drinkers (total N = 74) completed either approach-alcohol training, avoid-alcohol training or a sham-training on the Approach-Avoidance Task (AAT). Participants’ WMC was assessed prior to training, while their alcohol-related Action Tendency and selective attention were assessed before and after the training on the recently developed Selective-Attention/Action Tendency Task (SA/ATT), before finally completing an alcohol taste-test. There was no significant main effect of approach/avoidance training on alcohol consumption during the taste-test. However, there was a significant indirect effect of training on alcohol consumption mediated by a change in Action Tendency, but no indirect effect mediated by a change in selective attention. There was inconsistent evidence of WMC moderating training efficacy, with moderation found only for the effect of approach-alcohol training on the AAT but not on the SA/ATT. Thus approach/avoidance training affects alcohol consumption specifically by changing the underlying Action Tendency. Multiple training sessions may be required in order to observe more substantive changes in drinking behaviour.

  • Alcohol-related biases in selective attention and Action Tendency make distinct contributions to dysregulated drinking behaviour.
    Addiction (Abingdon England), 2013
    Co-Authors: Jason M. Sharbanee, Werner G. K. Stritzke, Reinout W. Wiers, Colin Macleod
    Abstract:

    AIMS: To assess whether alcohol-related biases in selective-attention and Action Tendency uniquely or concurrently predict the ability to regulate alcohol consumption. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: Two groups of undergraduate social drinkers (total n = 55) who differed in their ability to regulate their alcohol consumption completed a novel Selective-Attention/ActionTendency Task (SA/ATT), which assessed separately alcohol-related biases in selective attention and Action Tendency. SETTING: University of Western Australia, Australia. MEASUREMENT: Dysregulated drinking was operationalized as a self-reported high level of alcohol consumption on the Alcohol Consumption Questionnaire, and a high desire to reduce consumption on the Brief Readiness to Change Algorithm. Selective attention and Action Tendency were assessed using the SA/ATT, working memory was assessed using the operation-span task and participant characteristics were assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) and Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES). FINDINGS: Results indicated that (i) there was no significant association between alcohol-related biases in selective attention and Action Tendency, r = 0.16, P = 0.274, and (ii) biases towards alcohol, in both selective attention, β = 1.01, odds ratio = 2.74, P = 0.022, and Action Tendency, β = 1.24, odds ratio = 3.45, P = 0.015, predicted independent variance in dysregulated-drinker status. CONCLUSION: Biases in selective attention and Action Tendency appear to be distinct mechanisms that contribute independently to difficulty regulating alcohol consumption. Treatment components that could be combined to target both mechanisms could enhance treatment outcomes for alcohol-use disorders.

Jason M. Sharbanee – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the effect of approach avoidance training on alcohol consumption is mediated by change in alcohol Action Tendency
    PLOS ONE, 2014
    Co-Authors: Jason M. Sharbanee, Werner G. K. Stritzke, Reinout W. Wiers, Mike Rinck, Colin Macleod
    Abstract:

    Training people to respond to alcohol images by making avoidance joystick movements can affect subsequent alcohol consumption, and has shown initial efficacy as a treatment adjunct. However, the mechanisms that underlie the training’s efficacy are unknown. The present study aimed to determine 1) whether the training’s effect is mediated by a change in Action Tendency or a change in selective attention, and 2) whether the training’s effect is moderated by individual differences in working memory capacity (WMC). Three groups of social drinkers (total N = 74) completed either approach-alcohol training, avoid-alcohol training or a sham-training on the Approach-Avoidance Task (AAT). Participants’ WMC was assessed prior to training, while their alcohol-related Action Tendency and selective attention were assessed before and after the training on the recently developed Selective-Attention/Action Tendency Task (SA/ATT), before finally completing an alcohol taste-test. There was no significant main effect of approach/avoidance training on alcohol consumption during the taste-test. However, there was a significant indirect effect of training on alcohol consumption mediated by a change in Action Tendency, but no indirect effect mediated by a change in selective attention. There was inconsistent evidence of WMC moderating training efficacy, with moderation found only for the effect of approach-alcohol training on the AAT but not on the SA/ATT. Thus approach/avoidance training affects alcohol consumption specifically by changing the underlying Action Tendency. Multiple training sessions may be required in order to observe more substantive changes in drinking behaviour.

  • The effect of approach/avoidance training on alcohol consumption is mediated by change in alcohol Action Tendency
    PloS one, 2014
    Co-Authors: Jason M. Sharbanee, Werner G. K. Stritzke, Reinout W. Wiers, Mike Rinck, Colin Macleod
    Abstract:

    Training people to respond to alcohol images by making avoidance joystick movements can affect subsequent alcohol consumption, and has shown initial efficacy as a treatment adjunct. However, the mechanisms that underlie the training’s efficacy are unknown. The present study aimed to determine 1) whether the training’s effect is mediated by a change in Action Tendency or a change in selective attention, and 2) whether the training’s effect is moderated by individual differences in working memory capacity (WMC). Three groups of social drinkers (total N = 74) completed either approach-alcohol training, avoid-alcohol training or a sham-training on the Approach-Avoidance Task (AAT). Participants’ WMC was assessed prior to training, while their alcohol-related Action Tendency and selective attention were assessed before and after the training on the recently developed Selective-Attention/Action Tendency Task (SA/ATT), before finally completing an alcohol taste-test. There was no significant main effect of approach/avoidance training on alcohol consumption during the taste-test. However, there was a significant indirect effect of training on alcohol consumption mediated by a change in Action Tendency, but no indirect effect mediated by a change in selective attention. There was inconsistent evidence of WMC moderating training efficacy, with moderation found only for the effect of approach-alcohol training on the AAT but not on the SA/ATT. Thus approach/avoidance training affects alcohol consumption specifically by changing the underlying Action Tendency. Multiple training sessions may be required in order to observe more substantive changes in drinking behaviour.

  • Approach-alcohol Action tendencies can be inhibited by cognitive load
    Psychopharmacology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Jason M. Sharbanee, Werner G. K. Stritzke, M.e. Jamalludin, Reinout W. Wiers
    Abstract:

    Rationale Dysregulated alcohol consumption has been attributed to an imbalance between an approach-alcohol Action Tendency and executive control processes. However, which specific executive control processes are involved is not known. One candidate executive process is interference suppression, which refers to the suppression of task-irrelevant information through the active maintenance of task-relevant information or a cognitive load.

Reinout W. Wiers – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A Test of Multisession Automatic Action Tendency Retraining to Reduce Alcohol Consumption Among Young Adults in the Context of a Human Laboratory Paradigm
    Alcoholism clinical and experimental research, 2018
    Co-Authors: Robert F. Leeman, Reinout W. Wiers, Christine Nogueira, Janna Cousijn, Kelly Serafini, Kelly S. Demartini, John A. Bargh, Stephanie S. O'malley
    Abstract:

    Background Young adult heavy drinking is an important public health concern. Current interventions have efficacy but with only modest effects, and thus, novel interventions are needed. In prior studies, heavy drinkers, including young adults, have demonstrated stronger automatically triggered approach tendencies to alcohol-related stimuli than lighter drinkers. Automatic Action Tendency retraining has been developed to correct this Tendency and consequently reduce alcohol consumption. This study is the first to test multiple iterations of automatic Action Tendency retraining, followed by laboratory alcohol self-administration. Methods A total of 72 nontreatment-seeking, heavy drinking young adults ages 21 to 25 were randomized to automatic Action Tendency retraining or a control condition (i.e., “sham training”). Of these, 69 (54% male) completed 4 iterations of retraining or the control condition over 5 days with an alcohol drinking session on Day 5. Self-administration was conducted according to a human laboratory paradigm designed to model individual differences in impaired control (i.e., difficulty adhering to limits on alcohol consumption). Results Automatic Action Tendency retraining was not associated with greater reduction in alcohol approach Tendency or less alcohol self-administration than the control condition. The laboratory paradigm was probably sufficiently sensitive to detect an effect of an experimental manipulation given the range of self-administration behavior observed, both in terms of number of alcoholic and nonalcoholic drinks and measures of drinking topography. Conclusions Automatic Action Tendency retraining was ineffective among heavy drinking young adults without motivation to change their drinking. Details of the retraining procedure may have contributed to the lack of a significant effect. Despite null primary findings, the impaired control laboratory paradigm is a valid laboratory-based measure of young adult alcohol consumption that provides the opportunity to observe drinking topography and self-administration of nonalcoholic beverages (i.e., protective behavioral strategies directly related to alcohol use).

  • The effect of approach/avoidance training on alcohol consumption is mediated by change in alcohol Action Tendency
    PloS one, 2014
    Co-Authors: Jason M. Sharbanee, Werner G. K. Stritzke, Reinout W. Wiers, Mike Rinck, Colin Macleod
    Abstract:

    Training people to respond to alcohol images by making avoidance joystick movements can affect subsequent alcohol consumption, and has shown initial efficacy as a treatment adjunct. However, the mechanisms that underlie the training’s efficacy are unknown. The present study aimed to determine 1) whether the training’s effect is mediated by a change in Action Tendency or a change in selective attention, and 2) whether the training’s effect is moderated by individual differences in working memory capacity (WMC). Three groups of social drinkers (total N = 74) completed either approach-alcohol training, avoid-alcohol training or a sham-training on the Approach-Avoidance Task (AAT). Participants’ WMC was assessed prior to training, while their alcohol-related Action Tendency and selective attention were assessed before and after the training on the recently developed Selective-Attention/Action Tendency Task (SA/ATT), before finally completing an alcohol taste-test. There was no significant main effect of approach/avoidance training on alcohol consumption during the taste-test. However, there was a significant indirect effect of training on alcohol consumption mediated by a change in Action Tendency, but no indirect effect mediated by a change in selective attention. There was inconsistent evidence of WMC moderating training efficacy, with moderation found only for the effect of approach-alcohol training on the AAT but not on the SA/ATT. Thus approach/avoidance training affects alcohol consumption specifically by changing the underlying Action Tendency. Multiple training sessions may be required in order to observe more substantive changes in drinking behaviour.

  • the effect of approach avoidance training on alcohol consumption is mediated by change in alcohol Action Tendency
    PLOS ONE, 2014
    Co-Authors: Jason M. Sharbanee, Werner G. K. Stritzke, Reinout W. Wiers, Mike Rinck, Colin Macleod
    Abstract:

    Training people to respond to alcohol images by making avoidance joystick movements can affect subsequent alcohol consumption, and has shown initial efficacy as a treatment adjunct. However, the mechanisms that underlie the training’s efficacy are unknown. The present study aimed to determine 1) whether the training’s effect is mediated by a change in Action Tendency or a change in selective attention, and 2) whether the training’s effect is moderated by individual differences in working memory capacity (WMC). Three groups of social drinkers (total N = 74) completed either approach-alcohol training, avoid-alcohol training or a sham-training on the Approach-Avoidance Task (AAT). Participants’ WMC was assessed prior to training, while their alcohol-related Action Tendency and selective attention were assessed before and after the training on the recently developed Selective-Attention/Action Tendency Task (SA/ATT), before finally completing an alcohol taste-test. There was no significant main effect of approach/avoidance training on alcohol consumption during the taste-test. However, there was a significant indirect effect of training on alcohol consumption mediated by a change in Action Tendency, but no indirect effect mediated by a change in selective attention. There was inconsistent evidence of WMC moderating training efficacy, with moderation found only for the effect of approach-alcohol training on the AAT but not on the SA/ATT. Thus approach/avoidance training affects alcohol consumption specifically by changing the underlying Action Tendency. Multiple training sessions may be required in order to observe more substantive changes in drinking behaviour.