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Ngoc Kim Phan – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Karen Bieback – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • pooled thrombin Activated Platelet rich plasma a substitute for fetal bovine serum in the engineering of osteogenic vasculogenic grafts
    Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, 2017
    Co-Authors: Laurent A Tchang, Karen Bieback, Benjamin E Pippenger, Atanas Todorov, Francine Wolf, Maximilian G Burger, Claude Jaquiery, Ivan Martin, Dirk J Schaefer, Arnaud Scherberich
    Abstract:

    The use of fetal bovine serum (FBS) as a culture medium supplement in cell therapy and clinical tissue engineering is challenged by immunological concerns and the risk of disease transmission. Here we tested whether human, thrombinActivated, pooled, Platelet-rich plasma (tPRP) can be substituted for FBS in the engineering of osteogenic and vasculogenic grafts, using cells from the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of human adipose tissue. SVF cells were cultured under perfusion flow into porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds for 5 days, with the medium supplemented with either 10% tPRP or 10% FBS and implanted in an ectopic mouse model. Following in vitro culture, as compared to FBS, the use of tPRP did not modify the fraction of clonogenic cells or the different cell phenotypes, but increased by 1.9-fold the total number of cells. After 8 weeks in vivo, bone tissue was formed more reproducibly and in higher amounts (3.7-fold increase) in constructs cultured with tPRP. Staining for human-specific ALU sequences and for the human isoforms of CD31/CD34 revealed the human origin of the bone, the formation of blood vessels by human vascular progenitors and a higher density of human cells in implants cultured with tPRP. In summary, tPRP supports higher efficiency of bone formation by SVF cells than FBS, likely by enhancing cell expansion in vitro while maintaining vasculogenic properties. The use of tPRP may facilitate the clinical translation of osteogenic grafts with intrinsic capacity for vascularization, based on the use of adipose-derived cells. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • altered gene expression in human adipose stem cells cultured with fetal bovine serum compared to human supplements
    Tissue Engineering Part A, 2010
    Co-Authors: Karen Bieback, Harald Kluter, Viet Anhthu Ha, Andrea Hecker, Melanie Grassl, Sven Kinzebach, Hermann Solz, Carsten Sticht, Peter Bugert
    Abstract:

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for innovative cell therapeutic applications. For clinical scale manufacturing regulatory agencies recommend to replace fetal bovine serum (FBS) commonly used in MSC expansion media as soon as equivalent alternative supplements are available. We already demonstrated that pooled blood group AB human serum (HS) and thrombinActivated Platelet releasate plasma (tPRP) support the expansion of multipotent adipose tissue-derived MSCs (ASCs). Slight differences in size, growth pattern and adhesion prompted us to investigate the level of equivalence by compiling the transcriptional profiles of ASCs cultivated in these supplements. A whole genome gene exprexpression analysis was performed and data verified by polymerase chain reaction and protein analyses. Microarray-based screening of 34,039 genes revealed 102 genes differentially expressed in ASCs cultured with FBS compared to HS or tPRP supplements. A significantly higher expression in FBS cultures was found…

  • human ab serum and thrombin Activated Platelet rich plasma are suitable alternatives to fetal calf serum for the expansion of mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue
    Stem Cells, 2007
    Co-Authors: Asli Kocaoemer, Susanne Kern, Harald Kluter, Karen Bieback
    Abstract:

    MSCs are currently in focus regarding their clinical potential in cell therapy and tissue engineering. However, most isolation and expansion protocols for clinical-scale production of MSCs use fetal calfcalf serum (FCS) as a supplement, which poses a potential risk for infections as well as immunological reactions. To find a suitable FCS substitute, we investigated the effects of pooled human AB serum (AB-HS) and thrombinActivated Platelet-rich plasma (tPRP) on adipose tissue MSCs (AT-MSCs) with FCS as the standard control medium. AT-MSCs of 10 donors were cultured under three different conditions: (a) 10% FCS, (b) 10% AB-HS, and (c) 10% tPRP. Colony-forming units, cumulative population doubling rates, and differentiation capacity toward the adipogenic and osteogenic lineages were assessed, along with immunophenotype. We demonstrated that AB-HS and tPRP provide a significantly higher proliferative effect on AT-MSCs than does FCS. In the first six passages, AB-HS and tPRP MSCs exhibited a fold expansion of 66.6 +/- 15.7 and 68.1 +/- 6.7, respectively, compared with 24.4 +/- 0.7 for FCS. Differentiation capacity was preserved throughout long-term culture. Immunophenotype was characteristic for MSCs and comparable for all culture conditions with the exception of a distinct CD45-/CD14-positive side population for AB-HS and tPRP that tended to diminish with prolonged culture. We showed that pooled human AB serum and thrombinActivated Platelet-rich plasma are alternatives to FCS for AT-MSCs. These human sources are better characterized regarding potential infectious threats, while providing a higher proliferation rate and retaining differentiation capacity and mesenchymal stem cell marker expression throughout long-term culture. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

Nhan Luchinh Phan – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Activated Platelet rich plasma improves adipose derived stem cell transplantation efficiency in injured articular cartilage
    Stem Cell Research & Therapy, 2013
    Co-Authors: Phuc Van Pham, Khanh Hongthien Bui, Dat Quoc Ngo, Nhung Hai Truong, Nhan Luchinh Phan, Triet Dinh Duong, Thanh Duc Nguyen, Ngoc Kim Phan
    Abstract:

    Introduction Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) have been isolated, expanded, and applied in the treatment of many diseases. ADSCs have also been used to treat injured articular cartilage. However, there is controversy regarding the treatment efficiency. We considered that ADSC transplantation with Activated Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may improve injured articular cartilage compared with that of ADSC transplantation alone. In this study, we determined the role of PRP in ADSC transplantation to improve the treatment efficiency.

  • Activated Platelet-rich plasma improves adipose-derived stem cell transplantation efficiency in injured articular cartilage
    Stem Cell Research & Therapy, 2013
    Co-Authors: Phuc Van Pham, Nhung Hai Truong, Nhan Luchinh Phan, Triet Dinh Duong, Thanh Duc Nguyen, Ngoc Bich Vu, Dung Minh Le, Vien Tuong Le, Ngoc Kim Phan
    Abstract:

    Introduction Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) have been isolated, expanded, and applied in the treatment of many diseases. ADSCs have also been used to treat injured articular cartilage. However, there is controversy regarding the treatment efficiency. We considered that ADSC transplantation with Activated Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may improve injured articular cartilage compared with that of ADSC transplantation alone. In this study, we determined the role of PRP in ADSC transplantation to improve the treatment efficiency. Methods ADSCs were isolated and expanded from human adipose tissue. PRP was collected and Activated from human peripheral blood. The effects of PRP were evaluated in vitro and in ADSC transplantation in vivo . In vitro , the effects of PRP on ADSC proliferation, differentiation into chondrogenic cells, and inhibition of angiogenic factors were investigated at three concentrations of PRP (10%, 15% and 20%). In vivo , ADSCs pretreated with or without PRP were transplanted into murine models of injured articular cartilage. Results PRP promoted ADSC proliferation and differentiation into chondrogenic cells that strongly expressed collagen II, Sox9 and aggrecan. Moreover, PRP inhibited expression of the angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor. As a result, PRP-pretreated ADSCs improved healing of injured articular cartilage in murine models compared with that of untreated ADSCs. Conclusion Pretreatment of ADSCs with PRP is a simple method to efficiently apply ADSCs in cartilage regeneration. This study provides an important step toward the use of autologous ADSCs in the treatment of injured articular cartilage.

Nhung Hai Truong – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Activated Platelet rich plasma improves adipose derived stem cell transplantation efficiency in injured articular cartilage
    Stem Cell Research & Therapy, 2013
    Co-Authors: Phuc Van Pham, Khanh Hongthien Bui, Dat Quoc Ngo, Nhung Hai Truong, Nhan Luchinh Phan, Triet Dinh Duong, Thanh Duc Nguyen, Ngoc Kim Phan
    Abstract:

    Introduction Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) have been isolated, expanded, and applied in the treatment of many diseases. ADSCs have also been used to treat injured articular cartilage. However, there is controversy regarding the treatment efficiency. We considered that ADSC transplantation with Activated Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may improve injured articular cartilage compared with that of ADSC transplantation alone. In this study, we determined the role of PRP in ADSC transplantation to improve the treatment efficiency.

  • Activated Platelet-rich plasma improves adipose-derived stem cell transplantation efficiency in injured articular cartilage
    Stem Cell Research & Therapy, 2013
    Co-Authors: Phuc Van Pham, Nhung Hai Truong, Nhan Luchinh Phan, Triet Dinh Duong, Thanh Duc Nguyen, Ngoc Bich Vu, Dung Minh Le, Vien Tuong Le, Ngoc Kim Phan
    Abstract:

    Introduction Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) have been isolated, expanded, and applied in the treatment of many diseases. ADSCs have also been used to treat injured articular cartilage. However, there is controversy regarding the treatment efficiency. We considered that ADSC transplantation with Activated Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may improve injured articular cartilage compared with that of ADSC transplantation alone. In this study, we determined the role of PRP in ADSC transplantation to improve the treatment efficiency. Methods ADSCs were isolated and expanded from human adipose tissue. PRP was collected and Activated from human peripheral blood. The effects of PRP were evaluated in vitro and in ADSC transplantation in vivo . In vitro , the effects of PRP on ADSC proliferation, differentiation into chondrogenic cells, and inhibition of angiogenic factors were investigated at three concentrations of PRP (10%, 15% and 20%). In vivo , ADSCs pretreated with or without PRP were transplanted into murine models of injured articular cartilage. Results PRP promoted ADSC proliferation and differentiation into chondrogenic cells that strongly expressed collagen II, Sox9 and aggrecan. Moreover, PRP inhibited expression of the angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor. As a result, PRP-pretreated ADSCs improved healing of injured articular cartilage in murine models compared with that of untreated ADSCs. Conclusion Pretreatment of ADSCs with PRP is a simple method to efficiently apply ADSCs in cartilage regeneration. This study provides an important step toward the use of autologous ADSCs in the treatment of injured articular cartilage.

Thanh Duc Nguyen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Activated Platelet rich plasma improves adipose derived stem cell transplantation efficiency in injured articular cartilage
    Stem Cell Research & Therapy, 2013
    Co-Authors: Phuc Van Pham, Khanh Hongthien Bui, Dat Quoc Ngo, Nhung Hai Truong, Nhan Luchinh Phan, Triet Dinh Duong, Thanh Duc Nguyen, Ngoc Kim Phan
    Abstract:

    Introduction Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) have been isolated, expanded, and applied in the treatment of many diseases. ADSCs have also been used to treat injured articular cartilage. However, there is controversy regarding the treatment efficiency. We considered that ADSC transplantation with Activated Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may improve injured articular cartilage compared with that of ADSC transplantation alone. In this study, we determined the role of PRP in ADSC transplantation to improve the treatment efficiency.

  • Activated Platelet-rich plasma improves adipose-derived stem cell transplantation efficiency in injured articular cartilage
    Stem Cell Research & Therapy, 2013
    Co-Authors: Phuc Van Pham, Nhung Hai Truong, Nhan Luchinh Phan, Triet Dinh Duong, Thanh Duc Nguyen, Ngoc Bich Vu, Dung Minh Le, Vien Tuong Le, Ngoc Kim Phan
    Abstract:

    Introduction Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) have been isolated, expanded, and applied in the treatment of many diseases. ADSCs have also been used to treat injured articular cartilage. However, there is controversy regarding the treatment efficiency. We considered that ADSC transplantation with Activated Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may improve injured articular cartilage compared with that of ADSC transplantation alone. In this study, we determined the role of PRP in ADSC transplantation to improve the treatment efficiency. Methods ADSCs were isolated and expanded from human adipose tissue. PRP was collected and Activated from human peripheral blood. The effects of PRP were evaluated in vitro and in ADSC transplantation in vivo . In vitro , the effects of PRP on ADSC proliferation, differentiation into chondrogenic cells, and inhibition of angiogenic factors were investigated at three concentrations of PRP (10%, 15% and 20%). In vivo , ADSCs pretreated with or without PRP were transplanted into murine models of injured articular cartilage. Results PRP promoted ADSC proliferation and differentiation into chondrogenic cells that strongly expressed collagen II, Sox9 and aggrecan. Moreover, PRP inhibited expression of the angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor. As a result, PRP-pretreated ADSCs improved healing of injured articular cartilage in murine models compared with that of untreated ADSCs. Conclusion Pretreatment of ADSCs with PRP is a simple method to efficiently apply ADSCs in cartilage regeneration. This study provides an important step toward the use of autologous ADSCs in the treatment of injured articular cartilage.