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Active Antenna

The Experts below are selected from a list of 6345 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Makoto Kaneko – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Self-excited Dynamic Active Antenna
    Advanced Robotics, 2012
    Co-Authors: Naohiro Ueno, Makoto Kaneko

    Abstract:

    This paper proposes the Self-excited Dynamic Active Antenna (SDAA) that can detect a contact location between an insensitive flexible beam and an object through observation of the fundamental frequ…

  • ICRA – Contact localization by multiple Active Antenna
    Proceedings 1999 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (Cat. No.99CH36288C), 1999
    Co-Authors: N. Ueno, Makoto Kaneko

    Abstract:

    Discusses the multiple Active Antenna that is simply composed of two insensitive flexible beams placed in the rotational plane, one actuator, one position sensor and one axis moment sensor. The sensor system can detect the contact point between the beams and an object through a simple rotating motion even for the object placed with an inclination angle. During rotating motion, one beam first makes contact with an object. By continuously applying the rotating motion, the second beam makes contact with the same point of the object. Each contact angle is estimated by utilizing both the moment and position sensors. Finally, the contact point can be estimated by the geometrical relationship. The basic idea is verified by experiments.

  • Active Antenna for contact sensing
    International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 1998
    Co-Authors: Makoto Kaneko, Naoki Kanayama, Toshio Tsuji

    Abstract:

    This paper proposes a new Active sensor system (Active Antenna) that can detect not only the contact location between an insensitive flexible beam and an environment but also the information of the environment’s surface where the beam makes contact. The Active Antenna is simply composed of a flexible beam, actuators to move the beam, position sensors to measure the rotational angle of the beam, and a moment sensor. We first show that the contact distance under no lateral slip is proportional to the rotational compliance that the beam can sense at the rotational center. The lateral slip, which possibly occurs according to the pushing direction and the environment’s geometry, overestimates the rotational compliance, and as a result, brings a large sensing error for the localizing contact point. The goal of this paper is to find the contact location under such conditions. We explore how to detect a lateral slip and how to determine the new pushing direction to avoid it. We show an algorithm that can search for the pushing direction which can avoid any lateral slip. The convergence of this algorithm is shown and a practical utilization of this algorithm is also discussed with a trade-off between the number of trials and the sensing accuracy.

Toshio Tsuji – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Active Antenna for contact sensing
    International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 1998
    Co-Authors: Makoto Kaneko, Naoki Kanayama, Toshio Tsuji

    Abstract:

    This paper proposes a new Active sensor system (Active Antenna) that can detect not only the contact location between an insensitive flexible beam and an environment but also the information of the environment’s surface where the beam makes contact. The Active Antenna is simply composed of a flexible beam, actuators to move the beam, position sensors to measure the rotational angle of the beam, and a moment sensor. We first show that the contact distance under no lateral slip is proportional to the rotational compliance that the beam can sense at the rotational center. The lateral slip, which possibly occurs according to the pushing direction and the environment’s geometry, overestimates the rotational compliance, and as a result, brings a large sensing error for the localizing contact point. The goal of this paper is to find the contact location under such conditions. We explore how to detect a lateral slip and how to determine the new pushing direction to avoid it. We show an algorithm that can search for the pushing direction which can avoid any lateral slip. The convergence of this algorithm is shown and a practical utilization of this algorithm is also discussed with a trade-off between the number of trials and the sensing accuracy.

  • ICRA – On 3D vision based Active Antenna
    Proceedings of International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 1997
    Co-Authors: Naoki Kanayama, Makoto Kaneko, Toshio Tsuji

    Abstract:

    This paper discusses the 3D vision based Active Antenna (3D-VBAA) that can detect the contact force and the contact point between an insensitive elastic Antenna and a 3D environment. The 3D-VBAA is composed of an insensitive flexible Antenna, two actuators, two position sensors, a camera, and a one-axis moment sensor. By utilizing the Antenna‘s shape mapped into the calibration, plane C, the vision sensor can provide both the contact distance and a force component on C. The moment sensor output allows us to evaluate the force component normal to C. The 3D-VBAA can work even under a compliant object, while the 3D Active Antenna cannot. We show that the coupling effect between vision and moment sensor depends on the implementation angle of the CCD camera. We verify our idea experimentally.

  • Artificial Active Antenna
    Journal of the Robotics Society of Japan, 1997
    Co-Authors: Yutaka Hino, Makoto Kaneko, Naoki Kanayama, Toshio Tsuji

    Abstract:

    The Artificial Active Antenna is the sensor system motivated by the insect’s Antenna. It can detect the location between an insensitive flexible beam and an object through measurement of the rotational compliance on the beam in contact with the object. The goal of this paper is to consider the effects of the environment curvature on the sensing accuracy. We first introduce a set of basic equations representing force-deformation and geometrical relationships. Both numerical and approximate solutions are shown with experimental results. We show that the effect of the environment curvature on the sensing accuracy can be discussed by usung one non-dimensional parameter consisting of the pushing angle, the contact distance, and the radius of curvature of the object. Finally, we show that the environment curvature makes little influence on the sensing accuracy.

Serge N. Yerin – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • SNRs of two Active Antenna designs: Inverted V vs horizontal dipole
    2017 XI International Conference on Antenna Theory and Techniques (ICATT), 2017
    Co-Authors: Alexander A. Konovalenko, I.n. Bubnov, Peter L. Tokarsky, Serge N. Yerin

    Abstract:

    We present the results of numerical analysis of two design versions of Active Antenna which were considered for using in phased Antenna array of GURT radio telescope at the stage of preliminary design. Both Antenna versions are supplied with the same preamplifier but their dipole shapes differ. The first Active Antenna version has linear horizontal dipole, the second one – inverted V-dipole. The differences of input impedances, efficiencies, and mismatch coefficients of dipoles with preamplifier as well as the effect of these parameters on noise temperatures and SNR of Antennas are analyzed in detail.

  • Sensitivity of an Active Antenna Array Element for the Low-Frequency Radio Telescope GURT
    IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation, 2017
    Co-Authors: Peter L. Tokarsky, Alexander A. Konovalenko, Serge N. Yerin

    Abstract:

    The recently developed new generation, low-frequency Giant Ukrainian Radio Telescope (GURT) is built nearby the well-known Ukrainian T-shaped Radio Telescope. The new facility employs a phased Antenna array composed of many subarrays of 5×5 Active Antenna elements. In this paper, the parameters of the Active Antenna used as array element are studied, with special attention paid to sensitivity. The electrical and noise parameters are calculated using computer simulation and wave techniques for noise modeling of two-port networks. The results of numerical calculations of the sensitivity are given in terms of the sky noise dominance (SND) and system equivalent flux density of the GURT element within 10-80 MHz. The calculated results are compared with in situ measurements.