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Active Regeneration

The Experts below are selected from a list of 315 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Sameer Pallavkar – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Active Regeneration of diesel particulate filter employing microwave heating
    Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 2009
    Co-Authors: Sameer Pallavkar, Dan Rutman, Thomas C Ho

    Abstract:

    Wall-flow diesel particulate filters (DPFs) are considered the most effective devices for the control of diesel particulate emissions. A requirement for the reliable operation of the DPFs, however, is the periodic and/or continuous Regeneration of the filters. While microwave heating has been considered a potential Active Regeneration method for the DPFs, past studies on the technology have identified several technical problems leading to filter failure. The problems are mainly associated with the use of inappropriate filter materials for the microwave system and the generation of local hotspots due to uneven microwave heating, resulting in the physical damage to the filters. The objective of this study was to develop and demonstrate the technology employing a microwave-absorbing filter material coupled with an effective waveguide design for the reliable Regeneration of DPFs. In this study, a well-equipped diesel emission control laboratory was established to conduct the experiments. The experimental faci…

  • Active Regeneration of diesel particulate filter employing microwave heating
    Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research, 2009
    Co-Authors: Sameer Pallavkar, Tae-hoon Kim, Dan Rutman, Jerry Lin, Thomas Ho

    Abstract:

    Downregulation of Bid is associated with PKCɛ-mediated TRAIL resistance

  • Microwave Regeneration of diesel particulate filter
    2007 AIChE Annual Meeting, 2007
    Co-Authors: Tae-hoon Kim, Sameer Pallavkar, Dan Rutman, Jerry Lin, Thomas Ho

    Abstract:

    With stringent regulations introduced by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for on-road heavy duty diesel engines, the limit for Diesel Particulate Matter (DPM) emissions is to be 0.01 g/bhp-hr by 2007. Wall-flow Diesel Particulate Filters (DPFs) are considered the most effective devices for reducing DPM (mainly the Soot) from the diesel engine exhaust. However, as the filter pores are blocked by DPM during the filtration process, the pressure drop (DP) across the DPF increases in-turn affecting the efficiency of the engine performance. Thus in order to maintain practical and economic feasibility, periodic Regeneration of the DPF is a must, necessitating the removal of accumulated DPM and regenerating the filter pores for subsequent cycles of filtration. One of the biggest challenges in DPF Regeneration lies in the fact that the diesel exhaust temperatures are not high enough to reach the soot ignition temperatures thus requiring some sort of Active Regeneration scheme to promote soot combustion and filter Regeneration. This study demonstrated the use of microwave heating technology for DPF Regeneration where the microwave heating source was a commercially available household microwave oven and the Regeneration process was carried offline during soot combustion. The team developed a waveguide to distribute the microwave energy evenly all throughout the filter material and eliminate thermal failure. The filter temperature during the Regeneration process had reached way above the soot ignition temperature with no apparent thermal failures and multiple Regeneration cycles with high soot collection efficiencies were carried out.

John H. Johnson – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Development of a Kalman filter estimator for simulation and control of particulate matter distribution of a diesel catalyzed particulate filter
    International Journal of Engine Research, 2018
    Co-Authors: Boopathi Singalandapuram Mahadevan, John H. Johnson, Mahdi Shahbakhti

    Abstract:

    The knowledge of the temperature and particulate matter mass distribution is essential for monitoring the performance and durability of a catalyzed particulate filter. A catalyzed particulate filter model was developed, and it showed capability to accurately predict temperature and particulate matter mass distribution and pressure drop across the catalyzed particulate filter. However, the high-fidelity model is computationally demanding. Therefore, a reduced order multi-zone particulate filter model was developed to reduce computational complexity with an acceptable level of accuracy. In order to develop a reduced order model, a parametric study was carried out to determine the number of zones necessary for aftertreatment control applications. The catalyzed particulate filter model was further reduced by carrying out a sensitivity study of the selected model assumptions. The reduced order multi-zone particulate filter model with 5???5 zones was selected to develop a catalyzed particulate filter state estimator considering its computational time and accuracy. Next, a Kalman filter?based catalyzed particulate filter estimator was developed to estimate unknown states of the catalyzed particulate filter such as temperature and particulate matter mass distribution and pressure drop (?P) using the sensor inputs to the engine electronic control unit and the reduced order multi-zone particulate filter model. A diesel oxidation catalyst estimator was also integrated with the catalyzed particulate filter estimator in order to provide estimates of diesel oxidation catalyst outlet concentrations of NO2 and hydrocarbons and inlet temperature for the catalyzed particulate filter estimator. The combined diesel oxidation catalyst?catalyzed particulate filter estimator was validated for an Active Regeneration experiment. The validation results for catalyzed particulate filter temperature distribution showed that the root mean square temperature error by using the diesel oxidation catalyst?catalyzed particulate filter estimator is within 3.2?°C compared to the experimental data. Similarly, the ?P estimator closely simulated the measured total ?P and the estimated cake pressure drop error is within 0.2?kPa compared to the high-fidelity catalyzed particulate filter model.

  • Predicting Pressure Drop, Temperature, and Particulate Matter Distribution of a Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filter Using a Multi-Zone Model Including Cake Permeability
    Emission Control Science and Technology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Boopathi S. Mahadevan, John H. Johnson, Mahdi Shahbakhti

    Abstract:

    A multi-zone particulate filter (MPF) model was developed to predict pressure drop and PM oxidation of a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CPF). The MPF model builds upon our previous work (Mahadevan et al., J Emiss Control Sci Technol 1:183–202, 2015 ; Mahadevan et al., J Emiss Control Sci Technol 1:255–283, 2015 ) by adding a new multi-zone version of a classical 1-D filtration model (Konstandopoulos and Johnson, 1989 ) to account for PM filtration within the substrate wall and PM cake of a CPF. In addition, pressure drop (∆ P ) simulation capability was also developed for the MPF model in order to simulate the pressure drop across the substrate wall and PM cake of the CPF. A cake permeability model was developed based on fundamental research findings in the literature. The PM cake and wall pressure drop simulation accounts for the wall and cake permeability variation during loading, PM oxidation, and an additional post-loading after oxidation. This extended MPF model was calibrated using 18 runs of experimental data from a Cummins ISL engine that consisted of passive and Active Regeneration data sets for ULSD, B10, and B20 fuels. The validation results show that the new MPF model can predict PM loading with a maximum root mean square (RMS) error of 7.4% and predict (∆P) across the filter with an RMS error of within 7.2%. It is found that the permeability of the PM cake layer increases rapidly during PM oxidation. The increase in permeability was attributed to the damage in the PM cake and was simulated using the newly developed cake permeability model. The increased permeability of the damaged PM cake layer and oxidation of cake PM leads to near zero cake PM pressure drop during PM oxidation for the passive and Active Regeneration experiments.

  • Predicting Pressure Drop, Temperature, and Particulate Matter Distribution of a Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filter Using a Multi-Zone Model Including Cake Permeability
    Emission Control Science and Technology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Boopathi S. Mahadevan, John H. Johnson, Mahdi Shahbakhti

    Abstract:

    © 2017, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. A multi-zone particulate filter (MPF) model was developed to predict pressure drop and PM oxidation of a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CPF). The MPF model builds upon our previous work (Mahadevan et al., J Emiss Control Sci Technol 1:183–202, 2015; Mahadevan et al., J Emiss Control Sci Technol 1:255–283, 2015) by adding a new multi-zone version of a classical 1-D filtration model (Konstandopoulos and Johnson, 1989) to account for PM filtration within the substrate wall and PM cake of a CPF. In addition, pressure drop (∆P) simulation capability was also developed for the MPF model in order to simulate the pressure drop across the substrate wall and PM cake of the CPF. A cake permeability model was developed based on fundamental research findings in the literature. The PM cake and wall pressure drop simulation accounts for the wall and cake permeability variation during loading, PM oxidation, and an additional post-loading after oxidation. This extended MPF model was calibrated using 18 runs of experimental data from a Cummins ISL engine that consisted of passive and Active Regeneration data sets for ULSD, B10, and B20 fuels. The validation results show that the new MPF model can predict PM loading with a maximum root mean square (RMS) error of 7.4% and predict (∆P) across the filter with an RMS error of within 7.2%. It is found that the permeability of the PM cake layer increases rapidly during PM oxidation. The increase in permeability was attributed to the damage in the PM cake and was simulated using the newly developed cake permeability model. The increased permeability of the damaged PM cake layer and oxidation of cake PM leads to near zero cake PM pressure drop during PM oxidation for the passive and Active Regeneration experiments.

Thomas C Ho – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Active Regeneration of diesel particulate filter employing microwave heating
    Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 2009
    Co-Authors: Sameer Pallavkar, Dan Rutman, Thomas C Ho

    Abstract:

    Wall-flow diesel particulate filters (DPFs) are considered the most effective devices for the control of diesel particulate emissions. A requirement for the reliable operation of the DPFs, however, is the periodic and/or continuous Regeneration of the filters. While microwave heating has been considered a potential Active Regeneration method for the DPFs, past studies on the technology have identified several technical problems leading to filter failure. The problems are mainly associated with the use of inappropriate filter materials for the microwave system and the generation of local hotspots due to uneven microwave heating, resulting in the physical damage to the filters. The objective of this study was to develop and demonstrate the technology employing a microwave-absorbing filter material coupled with an effective waveguide design for the reliable Regeneration of DPFs. In this study, a well-equipped diesel emission control laboratory was established to conduct the experiments. The experimental faci…