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Greg P. Carman – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Developing Innovative Mesoscale Actuator Devices for Use in Rotorcraft Systems
    , 2002
    Co-Authors: Greg P. Carman, Bruce Dunn, Peretz Friedman, Tom Hahn
    Abstract:

    Abstract : The primary goal of this MURI was to develop a superior mesoscale piezoelectric Actuator Device when compared to conventional smart actuation systems. The secondary goal was to evaluate the potential use of the Device in rotorcraft systems to alter fluid-structure interactions and to decrease vibration loads and/or alleviate dynamic stall. The piezoelectric activated Device utilized frequency rectification concepts along with single crystal silicon micro-machined gears to produce step-like motions amplifying the displacement output of conventional piezoelectric stacks from microns to millimeters. The order of magnitude displacement improvement was also reflected in an order of magnitude increased power output of the system when operated in structural systems such as the rotorcraft. Accomplishing this goal required several tundamental science and engineering questions to be addressed. These included but were not limited to the long term electro-mechanical fatigue of piezoelectrics, the intrinsic strength of single crystal MEMS components, mesoscale manufacturing concepts, and development of thin film lithium batteries. In regards to Rotorcraft applications, experimental and analytical studies indicated substantial reductions in vibrations up to 90% along with alleviation of dynamic stall.

  • Mesoscale Actuator Device: micro interlocking mechanism to transfer macro load
    Sensors and Actuators A-physical, 1999
    Co-Authors: Quanfang Chen, Da-jeng Yao, Chang-jin “cj” Kim, Greg P. Carman
    Abstract:

    Abstract A novel proof-of-concept prototype Mesoscale Actuator Device (MAD) containing microscale components has been developed. The MAD is similar to piezoelectrically driven inchworm motors with the exception that mechanically interlocking microridges replace the traditional frictional clamping mechanisms. The interlocked microridges, fabricated from single crystal silicon, are designed to increase the load carrying capability of the Device substantially. Tests conducted on the current design demonstrate that interlocked microridges fabricated with 30% KOH solution support a 9.6 MPa shear stress or that a pair of 5×5 mm locked chips supports a 500 N load. For high frequency operation, an open loop control signal is implemented to synchronize the locking and unlocking of the microridges with the elongating and contracting of the Actuator. The system was successfully operated from 0.2 Hz to 500 Hz (or speeds from 2 μm/s to 5 mm/s). The upper limit (500 Hz) is imposed by software and hardware limitations and not related to physical limitations of the prototype Device.

  • Mesoscale Actuator Device: micro interlocking mechanism to transfer macro load
    Sensors and Actuators A: Physical, 1999
    Co-Authors: Quanfang Chen, Da-jeng Yao, Chang-jin `cj' Kim, Greg P. Carman
    Abstract:

    [[abstract]]A novel proof-of-concept prototype Mesoscale Actuator Device (MAD) containing microscale components has been developed. The MAD is similar to piezoelectrically driven inchworm motors with the exception that mechanically interlocking microridges replace the traditional frictional clamping mechanisms. The interlocked microridges, fabricated from single crystal silicon, are designed to increase the load carrying capability of the Device substantially. Tests conducted on the current design demonstrate that interlocked microridges fabricated with 30% KOH solution support a 9.6 MPa shear stress or that a pair of 5×5 mm locked chips supports a 500 N load. For high frequency operation, an open loop control signal is implemented to synchronize the locking and unlocking of the microridges with the elongating and contracting of the Actuator. The system was successfully operated from 0.2 Hz to 500 Hz (or speeds from 2 μm/s to 5 mm/s). The upper limit (500 Hz) is imposed by software and hardware limitations and not related to physical limitations of the prototype Device.[[fileno]]2020502010009[[department]]動機

Quanfang Chen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Microvalve for SMA-based CHAD
    Smart Structures and Materials 2003: Smart Electronics MEMS BioMEMS and Nanotechnology, 2003
    Co-Authors: Quanfang Chen, Daniel D. Shin, Gregory P. Carman
    Abstract:

    This paper describes the development of a micro-machined passive check valve for an SMA-based compact hybrid Actuator Device (CHAD). The overall diameter of the valve is 12 mm and the thickness is 1 mm. The structure houses an array of 56 micro check valves. Each micro valve has a 250 μm diameter orifice covered by 10 mm thick nickel flap. Stoppers on each micro valves limit the displacement of the flaps during an opening. This design allows the Ni flaps to withstand high-pressure gradient created by the Actuator while achieving high flow rate. A finite element analysis is used to characterize the static and dynamic behaviors of the valve flap for the prediction on flow rate. The prediction is found to be in good agreement with the experiment on static flow rate. The test results indicate that the flaps are able to withstand pressure difference of 0.28 MPa while achieving flow rate of 20 cc/sec. The valve also has low cracking pressure and reverse leakage.

  • Mesoscale Actuator Device: micro interlocking mechanism to transfer macro load
    Sensors and Actuators A-physical, 1999
    Co-Authors: Quanfang Chen, Da-jeng Yao, Chang-jin “cj” Kim, Greg P. Carman
    Abstract:

    Abstract A novel proof-of-concept prototype Mesoscale Actuator Device (MAD) containing microscale components has been developed. The MAD is similar to piezoelectrically driven inchworm motors with the exception that mechanically interlocking microridges replace the traditional frictional clamping mechanisms. The interlocked microridges, fabricated from single crystal silicon, are designed to increase the load carrying capability of the Device substantially. Tests conducted on the current design demonstrate that interlocked microridges fabricated with 30% KOH solution support a 9.6 MPa shear stress or that a pair of 5×5 mm locked chips supports a 500 N load. For high frequency operation, an open loop control signal is implemented to synchronize the locking and unlocking of the microridges with the elongating and contracting of the Actuator. The system was successfully operated from 0.2 Hz to 500 Hz (or speeds from 2 μm/s to 5 mm/s). The upper limit (500 Hz) is imposed by software and hardware limitations and not related to physical limitations of the prototype Device.

  • Mesoscale Actuator Device: micro interlocking mechanism to transfer macro load
    Sensors and Actuators A: Physical, 1999
    Co-Authors: Quanfang Chen, Da-jeng Yao, Chang-jin `cj' Kim, Greg P. Carman
    Abstract:

    [[abstract]]A novel proof-of-concept prototype Mesoscale Actuator Device (MAD) containing microscale components has been developed. The MAD is similar to piezoelectrically driven inchworm motors with the exception that mechanically interlocking microridges replace the traditional frictional clamping mechanisms. The interlocked microridges, fabricated from single crystal silicon, are designed to increase the load carrying capability of the Device substantially. Tests conducted on the current design demonstrate that interlocked microridges fabricated with 30% KOH solution support a 9.6 MPa shear stress or that a pair of 5×5 mm locked chips supports a 500 N load. For high frequency operation, an open loop control signal is implemented to synchronize the locking and unlocking of the microridges with the elongating and contracting of the Actuator. The system was successfully operated from 0.2 Hz to 500 Hz (or speeds from 2 μm/s to 5 mm/s). The upper limit (500 Hz) is imposed by software and hardware limitations and not related to physical limitations of the prototype Device.[[fileno]]2020502010009[[department]]動機

Da-jeng Yao – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Mesoscale Actuator Device: micro interlocking mechanism to transfer macro load
    Sensors and Actuators A-physical, 1999
    Co-Authors: Quanfang Chen, Da-jeng Yao, Chang-jin “cj” Kim, Greg P. Carman
    Abstract:

    Abstract A novel proof-of-concept prototype Mesoscale Actuator Device (MAD) containing microscale components has been developed. The MAD is similar to piezoelectrically driven inchworm motors with the exception that mechanically interlocking microridges replace the traditional frictional clamping mechanisms. The interlocked microridges, fabricated from single crystal silicon, are designed to increase the load carrying capability of the Device substantially. Tests conducted on the current design demonstrate that interlocked microridges fabricated with 30% KOH solution support a 9.6 MPa shear stress or that a pair of 5×5 mm locked chips supports a 500 N load. For high frequency operation, an open loop control signal is implemented to synchronize the locking and unlocking of the microridges with the elongating and contracting of the Actuator. The system was successfully operated from 0.2 Hz to 500 Hz (or speeds from 2 μm/s to 5 mm/s). The upper limit (500 Hz) is imposed by software and hardware limitations and not related to physical limitations of the prototype Device.

  • Mesoscale Actuator Device: micro interlocking mechanism to transfer macro load
    Sensors and Actuators A: Physical, 1999
    Co-Authors: Quanfang Chen, Da-jeng Yao, Chang-jin `cj' Kim, Greg P. Carman
    Abstract:

    [[abstract]]A novel proof-of-concept prototype Mesoscale Actuator Device (MAD) containing microscale components has been developed. The MAD is similar to piezoelectrically driven inchworm motors with the exception that mechanically interlocking microridges replace the traditional frictional clamping mechanisms. The interlocked microridges, fabricated from single crystal silicon, are designed to increase the load carrying capability of the Device substantially. Tests conducted on the current design demonstrate that interlocked microridges fabricated with 30% KOH solution support a 9.6 MPa shear stress or that a pair of 5×5 mm locked chips supports a 500 N load. For high frequency operation, an open loop control signal is implemented to synchronize the locking and unlocking of the microridges with the elongating and contracting of the Actuator. The system was successfully operated from 0.2 Hz to 500 Hz (or speeds from 2 μm/s to 5 mm/s). The upper limit (500 Hz) is imposed by software and hardware limitations and not related to physical limitations of the prototype Device.[[fileno]]2020502010009[[department]]動機

  • frequency response of an inchworm motor fabricated with micromachined interlocking surface mesoscale Actuator Device mad
    Smart Structures and Materials 1998: Smart Structures and Integrated Systems, 1998
    Co-Authors: Quanfang Chen, Da-jeng Yao, Chang-jin Kim, Gregory P. Carman
    Abstract:

    The development and frequency response of a novel proof-of- concept prototype Mesoscale Actuator Device (MAD) is described in this paper. The MAD is similar to piezoelectric driven inchworm motors with the exception that mechanically interlocking microridges replace the traditional frictional clamping mechanisms. The interlocked microridges, microfabricated from single crystal silicon, are shown to support macroscopic loads. Tests conducted on the current design demonstrate that the interlocked microridges support 16 MPa in shear or that two sets of 3 X 5 mm locked chips support a 50 kgf. Operation of three generations of prototype MAD Device containing microridges are accomplished at relatively large frequencies using an open loop control signal. Synchronizing the locking and unlocking of the microridges with the elongating and contracting Actuator requires a dedicated waveform in the voltage signal supplied and permitted large operational frequencies. First generation operates at 0.6 Hz and demonstrated 1000s microridges can be engaged without problem, second generation moves like an inchworm up to 32 Hz, and the third generation including an external force was successfully operated from 0.2 Hz to 500 Hz corresponding to speeds from 2 micrometers /s to 5 mm/s. The upper limit (500 Hz) was imposed by software limitations and not related to physical limitations of the current Device.

Ephrahim Garcia – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • variable recruitment fluidic artificial muscles modeling and experiments
    Smart Materials and Structures, 2014
    Co-Authors: Matthew Bryant, Michael A Meller, Ephrahim Garcia
    Abstract:

    We investigate taking advantage of the lightweight, compliant nature of fluidic artificial muscles to create variable recruitment Actuators in the form of artificial muscle bundles. Several Actuator elements at different diameter scales are packaged to act as a single Actuator Device. The Actuator elements of the bundle can be connected to the fluidic control circuit so that different groups of Actuator elements, much like individual muscle fibers, can be activated independently depending on the required force output and motion. This novel actuation concept allows us to save energy by effectively impedance matching the active size of the Actuators on the fly based on the instantaneous required load. This design also allows a single bundled Actuator to operate in substantially different force regimes, which could be valuable for robots that need to perform a wide variety of tasks and interact safely with humans. This paper proposes, models and analyzes the actuation efficiency of this Actuator concept. The analysis shows that variable recruitment operation can create an Actuator that reduces throttling valve losses to operate more efficiently over a broader range of its force–strain operating space. We also present preliminary results of the design, fabrication and experimental characterization of three such bioinspired variable recruitment Actuator prototypes.

  • toward variable recruitment fluidic artificial muscles
    Volume 2: Mechanics and Behavior of Active Materials; Structural Health Monitoring; Bioinspired Smart Materials and Systems; Energy Harvesting, 2013
    Co-Authors: Matthew Bryant, Michael A Meller, Ephrahim Garcia
    Abstract:

    We investigate taking advantage of the lightweight, compliant nature of fluidic artificial muscles to create variable recruitment Actuators in the form of artificial muscle bundles. Several Actuator elements at different diameter scales are packaged to act as a single Actuator Device. The Actuator elements of the bundle can be connected to the fluidic control circuit so that different groups of Actuator elements, much like individual muscle fibers, can be activated independently depending on the required force output and motion. This novel actuation concept allows us to save energy by effectively selecting the size of the Actuators on the fly based on the instantaneous required load, versus the traditional method wherein Actuators are sized for the maximum required load, and energy is wasted by oversized Actuators most of the time. This design also allows a single bundled Actuator to operate in substantially different force regimes, which could be valuable for robots that need to perform a wide variety of tasks and interact safely with humans. This paper will propose this Actuator concept and show preliminary results of the design, fabrication, and experimental characterization of three such bioinspired variable recruitment Actuator prototypes.Copyright © 2013 by ASME

Jie Song – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Cell Nanomechanics Based on Dielectric Elastomer Actuator Device
    Nano-Micro Letters, 2019
    Co-Authors: Zhichao Li, Chao Gao, Sisi Fan, Jiang Zou, Guoying Gu, Mingdong Dong, Jie Song
    Abstract:

    HighlightsThe main components, principle, and technology of dielectric elastomer Actuator (DEA) were reviewed to illustrate that DEA can be an effective carrier for mechanobiology research. Comparison between DEA-based bioreactors and current commercial Devices is provided, as well as the outlook of the DEA bio-applications in the future.AbstractAs a frontier of biology, mechanobiology plays an important role in tissue and biomedical engineering. It is a common sense that mechanical cues under extracellular microenvironment affect a lot in regulating the behaviors of cells such as proliferation and gene expression, etc. In such an interdisciplinary field, engineering methods like the pneumatic and motor-driven Devices have been employed for years. Nevertheless, such techniques usually rely on complex structures, which cost much but not so easy to control. Dielectric elastomer Actuators (DEAs) are well known as a kind of soft actuation technology, and their research prospect in biomechanical field is gradually concerned due to their properties just like large deformation (> 100%) and fast response (

  • Cell Nanomechanics Based on Dielectric Elastomer Actuator Device
    Nano-Micro Letters, 2019
    Co-Authors: Chao Gao, Sisi Fan, Jiang Zou, Mingdong Dong, Jie Song
    Abstract:

    As a frontier of biology, mechanobiology plays an important role in tissue and biomedical engineering. It is a common sense that mechanical cues under extracellular microenvironment affect a lot in regulating the behaviors of cells such as proliferation and gene expression, etc. In such an interdisciplinary field, engineering methods like the pneumatic and motor-driven Devices have been employed for years. Nevertheless, such techniques usually rely on complex structures, which cost much but not so easy to control. Dielectric elastomer Actuators (DEAs) are well known as a kind of soft actuation technology, and their research prospect in biomechanical field is gradually concerned due to their properties just like large deformation (> 100%) and fast response (