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Acupuncture Treatment

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Chien Chang Liao – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Risk of epilepsy in stroke patients receiving Acupuncture Treatment: a nationwide retrospective matched-cohort study
    BMJ Open, 2016
    Co-Authors: Shu Wen Weng, Chien Chang Liao, Ta Liang Chen, Hsin Long Lane, Chun Chuan Shih

    Abstract:

    Objective To investigate the risk of epilepsy in stroke patients receiving and not receiving Acupuncture Treatment. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting This study was based on Taiwan9s National Health Insurance Research Database that included information on stroke patients hospitalised between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2004. Participants We identified 42 040 patients hospitalised with newly diagnosed stroke who were aged 20 years and above. Primary and secondary outcome measures We compared incident epilepsy during the follow-up period until the end of 2009 in stroke patients who were and were not receiving Acupuncture. The adjusted HRs and 95% CIs of epilepsy associated with Acupuncture were calculated using multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression. Results Stroke patients who received Acupuncture Treatment (9.8 per 1000 person-years) experienced a reduced incidence of epilepsy compared to those who did not receive Acupuncture Treatment (11.5 per 1000 person-years), with an HR of 0.74 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.80) after adjustment for sociodemographic factors and coexisting medical conditions. Acupuncture Treatment was associated with a decreased risk of epilepsy, particularly among stroke patients aged 20–69 years. The log-rank test probability curve indicated that stroke patients receiving Acupuncture Treatment had a reduced probability of epilepsy compared with individuals who did not receive Acupuncture Treatment during the follow-up period (p Conclusions Stroke patients who received Acupuncture Treatment had a reduced risk of epilepsy compared with those not receiving Acupuncture Treatment. However, the protective effects associated with Acupuncture Treatment require further validation in prospective cohort studies.

  • a retrospective cohort study comparing stroke recurrence rate in ischemic stroke patients with and without Acupuncture Treatment
    Medicine, 2015
    Co-Authors: Chun Chuan Shih, Chien Chang Liao, Yichang Su, Donald E Morisky, Fung Chang Sung

    Abstract:

    Little was known about the effects of Acupuncture on stroke recurrence. The aim of this study is to investigate whether ischemic stroke patients receiving Acupuncture Treatment have a decreased risk of stroke recurrence. A retrospective cohort study of 30,058 newly diagnosed cases of ischemic stroke in 2000 to 2004 was conducted based on the claims of Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The use of Acupuncture Treatment and stroke recurrence were identified during the follow-up period from 2000 to 2009. This study compared the risk of stroke recurrence between ischemic stroke cohorts with and without Acupuncture Treatment by calculating adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of Acupuncture associated with stroke recurrence in the Cox proportional hazard model. The stroke recurrence rate per 1000 person-years decreased from 71.4 without to 69.9 with Acupuncture Treatment (P < 0.001). Acupuncture Treatment was associated with reduced risk of stroke recurrence (HR 0.88; 95% CI 0.84-0.91). The Acupuncture effect was noted in patients with or without medical Treatment for stroke prevention but its impact decreased with aging of stroke patients. Compared with stroke patients without Acupuncture Treatment and medication therapy, the hazard ratios of stroke recurrence for those had medication therapy only, Acupuncture only, and both were 0.42 (95% CI 0.38-0.46), 0.50 (95% CI 0.43-0.57), and 0.39 (95% CI 0.35-0.43), respectively. This study raises the possibility that Acupuncture might be effective in lowering stroke recurrence rate even in those on medications for stroke prevention. Results suggest the need of prospective sham-controlled and randomized trials to establish the efficacy of Acupuncture in preventing stroke.

  • decreased risk of stroke in patients with traumatic brain injury receiving Acupuncture Treatment a population based retrospective cohort study
    PLOS ONE, 2014
    Co-Authors: Chun Chuan Shih, Ta Liang Chen, Hsin Long Lane, Chin Chuan Tsai, Wen Ta Chiu, Hwang Huei Wang, Fung Chang Sung, Yihgiun Cherng, Chien Chang Liao

    Abstract:

    Background
    Patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) face increased risk of stroke. Whether Acupuncture can help to protect TBI patients from stroke has not previously been studied.

    Methods
    Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database was used to conduct a retrospective cohort study of 7409 TBI patients receiving Acupuncture Treatment and 29,636 propensity-score-matched TBI patients without Acupuncture Treatment in 2000–2008 as controls. Both TBI cohorts were followed until the end of 2010 and adjusted for immortal time to measure the incidence and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of new-onset stroke in the multivariable Cox proportional hazard models.

    Results
    TBI patients with Acupuncture Treatment (4.9 per 1000 person-years) had a lower incidence of stroke compared with those without Acupuncture Treatment (7.5 per 1000 person-years), with a HR of 0.59 (95% CI = 0.50–0.69) after adjustment for sociodemographics, coexisting medical conditions and medications. The association between Acupuncture Treatment and stroke risk was investigated by sex and age group (20–44, 45–64, and ≥65 years). The probability curve with log-rank test showed that TBI patients receiving Acupuncture Treatment had a lower probability of stroke than those without Acupuncture Treatment during the follow-up period (p<0.0001). Conclusion Patients with TBI receiving Acupuncture Treatment show decreased risk of stroke compared with those without Acupuncture Treatment. However, this study was limited by lack of information regarding lifestyles, biochemical profiles, TBI severity, and Acupuncture points used in Treatments.

Chun Chuan Shih – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Risk of epilepsy in stroke patients receiving Acupuncture Treatment: a nationwide retrospective matched-cohort study
    BMJ Open, 2016
    Co-Authors: Shu Wen Weng, Chien Chang Liao, Ta Liang Chen, Hsin Long Lane, Chun Chuan Shih

    Abstract:

    Objective To investigate the risk of epilepsy in stroke patients receiving and not receiving Acupuncture Treatment. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting This study was based on Taiwan9s National Health Insurance Research Database that included information on stroke patients hospitalised between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2004. Participants We identified 42 040 patients hospitalised with newly diagnosed stroke who were aged 20 years and above. Primary and secondary outcome measures We compared incident epilepsy during the follow-up period until the end of 2009 in stroke patients who were and were not receiving Acupuncture. The adjusted HRs and 95% CIs of epilepsy associated with Acupuncture were calculated using multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression. Results Stroke patients who received Acupuncture Treatment (9.8 per 1000 person-years) experienced a reduced incidence of epilepsy compared to those who did not receive Acupuncture Treatment (11.5 per 1000 person-years), with an HR of 0.74 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.80) after adjustment for sociodemographic factors and coexisting medical conditions. Acupuncture Treatment was associated with a decreased risk of epilepsy, particularly among stroke patients aged 20–69 years. The log-rank test probability curve indicated that stroke patients receiving Acupuncture Treatment had a reduced probability of epilepsy compared with individuals who did not receive Acupuncture Treatment during the follow-up period (p Conclusions Stroke patients who received Acupuncture Treatment had a reduced risk of epilepsy compared with those not receiving Acupuncture Treatment. However, the protective effects associated with Acupuncture Treatment require further validation in prospective cohort studies.

  • a retrospective cohort study comparing stroke recurrence rate in ischemic stroke patients with and without Acupuncture Treatment
    Medicine, 2015
    Co-Authors: Chun Chuan Shih, Chien Chang Liao, Yichang Su, Donald E Morisky, Fung Chang Sung

    Abstract:

    Little was known about the effects of Acupuncture on stroke recurrence. The aim of this study is to investigate whether ischemic stroke patients receiving Acupuncture Treatment have a decreased risk of stroke recurrence. A retrospective cohort study of 30,058 newly diagnosed cases of ischemic stroke in 2000 to 2004 was conducted based on the claims of Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The use of Acupuncture Treatment and stroke recurrence were identified during the follow-up period from 2000 to 2009. This study compared the risk of stroke recurrence between ischemic stroke cohorts with and without Acupuncture Treatment by calculating adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of Acupuncture associated with stroke recurrence in the Cox proportional hazard model. The stroke recurrence rate per 1000 person-years decreased from 71.4 without to 69.9 with Acupuncture Treatment (P < 0.001). Acupuncture Treatment was associated with reduced risk of stroke recurrence (HR 0.88; 95% CI 0.84-0.91). The Acupuncture effect was noted in patients with or without medical Treatment for stroke prevention but its impact decreased with aging of stroke patients. Compared with stroke patients without Acupuncture Treatment and medication therapy, the hazard ratios of stroke recurrence for those had medication therapy only, Acupuncture only, and both were 0.42 (95% CI 0.38-0.46), 0.50 (95% CI 0.43-0.57), and 0.39 (95% CI 0.35-0.43), respectively. This study raises the possibility that Acupuncture might be effective in lowering stroke recurrence rate even in those on medications for stroke prevention. Results suggest the need of prospective sham-controlled and randomized trials to establish the efficacy of Acupuncture in preventing stroke.

  • decreased risk of stroke in patients with traumatic brain injury receiving Acupuncture Treatment a population based retrospective cohort study
    PLOS ONE, 2014
    Co-Authors: Chun Chuan Shih, Ta Liang Chen, Hsin Long Lane, Chin Chuan Tsai, Wen Ta Chiu, Hwang Huei Wang, Fung Chang Sung, Yihgiun Cherng, Chien Chang Liao

    Abstract:

    Background
    Patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) face increased risk of stroke. Whether Acupuncture can help to protect TBI patients from stroke has not previously been studied.

    Methods
    Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database was used to conduct a retrospective cohort study of 7409 TBI patients receiving Acupuncture Treatment and 29,636 propensity-score-matched TBI patients without Acupuncture Treatment in 2000–2008 as controls. Both TBI cohorts were followed until the end of 2010 and adjusted for immortal time to measure the incidence and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of new-onset stroke in the multivariable Cox proportional hazard models.

    Results
    TBI patients with Acupuncture Treatment (4.9 per 1000 person-years) had a lower incidence of stroke compared with those without Acupuncture Treatment (7.5 per 1000 person-years), with a HR of 0.59 (95% CI = 0.50–0.69) after adjustment for sociodemographics, coexisting medical conditions and medications. The association between Acupuncture Treatment and stroke risk was investigated by sex and age group (20–44, 45–64, and ≥65 years). The probability curve with log-rank test showed that TBI patients receiving Acupuncture Treatment had a lower probability of stroke than those without Acupuncture Treatment during the follow-up period (p<0.0001). Conclusion Patients with TBI receiving Acupuncture Treatment show decreased risk of stroke compared with those without Acupuncture Treatment. However, this study was limited by lack of information regarding lifestyles, biochemical profiles, TBI severity, and Acupuncture points used in Treatments.

Gordon H Guyatt – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Acupuncture Treatment for knee osteoarthritis with sensitive points protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial
    BMJ Open, 2018
    Co-Authors: Li Tang, Ning Li, Ling Zhao, Deying Kang, Ling Li, Hui Zheng, Ying Li, Gordon H Guyatt

    Abstract:

    Introduction There is a lack of curative medical Treatment for patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Acupuncture represents an important alternative therapy. According to the theory of traditional Chinese medicine and preliminary clinical evidence, the patients’ acupoints and tender points may become sensitised when the body suffers from a disease state; stimulation of such sensitive points could lead to a disease improvement. It is thus hypothesised that Acupuncture at highly sensitised points on patients with KOA would achieve better Treatment outcomes than Acupuncture at low/non-sensitised points. Previously, we conducted a pilot trial to prove the feasibility of further investigation. Methods and analysis A three-arm, parallel, multicentre randomised controlled trial of 666 patients will be conducted at four hospitals of China. Eligible patients with KOA who consent to participate will be randomly assigned to a high-sensitisation group (patients receive Acupuncture Treatment at high-sensitive points), a low/non-sensitisation group (patients receive Acupuncture Treatment at low/non-sensitive points) or a waiting-list group (patients receive standard Acupuncture Treatment after the study is concluded) via a central randomisation system using 1:1:1 ratio. The primary outcome is the change of Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index total score from baseline to 16 weeks. Outcome assessors and data analysts will be blinded and participants will be asked not to reveal their allocation to assessors. The outcome analyses will be performed both on the intention-to-treat and per-protocol population. The primary analyses will test if Acupuncture at highly sensitised points would achieve statistically better Treatment outcomes than Acupuncture at low/non-sensitised points and no Acupuncture (ie, waiting list), respectively. A small number of prespecified subgroup analyses will be conducted. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval has been granted by the Bioethics Subcommittee of West China Hospital, Sichuan University: 2017 (Number 228). Results will be expected to be published in peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration number NCT03299439.